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Open AccessReview

Capsaicin: Friend or Foe in Skin Cancer and Other Related Malignancies?

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Department of Dermatology, Carol DavilaUniversity of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
2
Department of Biochemistry, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
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Department of Physiology, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 050474 Bucharest, Romania
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Department of Dermatology, Prof. N.C. Paulescu National Institute of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, 011233 Bucharest, Romania
5
Immunology Department, Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, 050096 Bucharest, Romania
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Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, 76201 Bucharest, Romania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2017, 9(12), 1365; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121365
Received: 15 November 2017 / Revised: 11 December 2017 / Accepted: 12 December 2017 / Published: 16 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceuticals and the Skin: Roles in Health and Disease)
Capsaicin is the main pungent in chili peppers, one of the most commonly used spices in the world; its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties have been proven in various cultures for centuries. It is a lipophilic substance belonging to the class of vanilloids and an agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor. Taking into consideration the complex neuro-immune impact of capsaicin and the potential link between inflammation and carcinogenesis, the effect of capsaicin on muco-cutaneous cancer has aroused a growing interest. The aim of this review is to look over the most recent data regarding the connection between capsaicin and muco-cutaneous cancers, with emphasis on melanoma and muco-cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. View Full-Text
Keywords: capsaicin; skin; neurogenic inflammation; cancer; carcinogenesis; squamous cell carcinoma; melanoma capsaicin; skin; neurogenic inflammation; cancer; carcinogenesis; squamous cell carcinoma; melanoma
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MDPI and ACS Style

Georgescu, S.-R.; Sârbu, M.-I.; Matei, C.; Ilie, M.A.; Caruntu, C.; Constantin, C.; Neagu, M.; Tampa, M. Capsaicin: Friend or Foe in Skin Cancer and Other Related Malignancies? Nutrients 2017, 9, 1365. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121365

AMA Style

Georgescu S-R, Sârbu M-I, Matei C, Ilie MA, Caruntu C, Constantin C, Neagu M, Tampa M. Capsaicin: Friend or Foe in Skin Cancer and Other Related Malignancies? Nutrients. 2017; 9(12):1365. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121365

Chicago/Turabian Style

Georgescu, Simona-Roxana; Sârbu, Maria-Isabela; Matei, Clara; Ilie, Mihaela A.; Caruntu, Constantin; Constantin, Carolina; Neagu, Monica; Tampa, Mircea. 2017. "Capsaicin: Friend or Foe in Skin Cancer and Other Related Malignancies?" Nutrients 9, no. 12: 1365. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121365

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