Special Issue "Celiac Disease and Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity, Extraintestinal-Associated Conditions: Efficacy of a Gluten-Free Diet"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Prebiotics and Probiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2023.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Luis Rodrigo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Gastroenterology Department. Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias (HUCA). University of Oviedo, Spain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Celiac Disease (CD) and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) are the two most frequent conditions belonging to the group of Gluten-Related Disorders (GRDs). Both diseases are triggered and worsened by gluten proteins ingestion, and these affect genetically predisposed individuals. The main prevalence of CD is around 1–2%, and NCGS is much more frequent, estimated at between 5 and 15% of the general population, all over the world.

GRDs are manifested by symptoms of gastrointestinal tract disorders, as well as many others complaints coming from various hematological dermatological endocrinological, gynecological, rheumatological, and nervous-system-associated conditions. The presence of these different extraintestinal processes can appear before or after the diagnosis of CD or NCGS, and may befit the instauration of a gluten-free diet (GFD)

It is believed that NCGS represents heterogeneous groups with different subgroups characterized by different etiologies, different clinical histories, and different courses. There also appears to be an overlap between NCGS and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

GFD should be used in patients with a diagnosed GRDs, including CD, NCGS, and wheat-sensitive eosinophilic esophagitis (WSEE). Use of this diet in the management of other digestive conditions, including gastroesophageal reflux disease, IBS, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is still controversial.

The current Special Issue, entitled “Celiac Disease and Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity, Extraintestinal-Associated Conditions: Efficacy of a Gluten-Free Diet” is designed to include articles that will address these issues. We welcome different types of manuscript submissions, including original research articles and up-to-date reviews (systematic reviews and meta-analyses).

Dr. Luis Rodrigo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Celiac Disease
  • Nonceliac Gluten-Sensitivity
  • Extraintestinal Associated Conditions
  • Gluten-Free Diet
  • Gluten-Related Disorders
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Case Study of the Response of Immunogenic Gluten Peptides to Sourdough Proteolysis
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1906; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061906 - 01 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Celiac disease is activated by digestion-resistant gluten peptides that contain immunogenic epitopes. Sourdough fermentation is a potential strategy to reduce the concentration of these peptides within food. However, we currently know little about the effect of partial sourdough fermentation on immunogenic gluten. This [...] Read more.
Celiac disease is activated by digestion-resistant gluten peptides that contain immunogenic epitopes. Sourdough fermentation is a potential strategy to reduce the concentration of these peptides within food. However, we currently know little about the effect of partial sourdough fermentation on immunogenic gluten. This study examined the effect of a single sourdough culture (representative of those that the public may consume) on the digestion of immunogenic gluten peptides. Sourdough bread was digested via the INFOGEST protocol. Throughout digestion, quantitative and discovery mass spectrometry were used to model the kinetic release profile of key immunogenic peptides and profile novel peptides, while ELISA probed the gluten’s allergenicity. Macrostructural studies were also undertaken. Sourdough fermentation altered the protein structure, in vitro digestibility, and immunogenic peptide release profile. Interestingly, sourdough fermentation did not decrease the total immunogenic peptide concentration but altered the in vitro digestion profile of select immunogenic peptides. This work demonstrates that partial sourdough fermentation can alter immunogenic gluten digestion, and is the first study to examine the in vitro kinetic profile of immunogenic gluten peptides from sourdough bread. Full article
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Article
Self-Reported Diet and Health Outcomes of Participants of the CCSVI-Tracking Survey Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1891; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061891 - 31 May 2021
Viewed by 1120
Abstract
Of the 1575 participants of the CCSVI-Tracking Survey, 475 patients recorded their quality of life and EDSS outcomes for at least 2 months. Self-reported use of complementary and conventional therapies included diet, use of drug therapy, symptoms, quality of life, and mobility. Analysis [...] Read more.
Of the 1575 participants of the CCSVI-Tracking Survey, 475 patients recorded their quality of life and EDSS outcomes for at least 2 months. Self-reported use of complementary and conventional therapies included diet, use of drug therapy, symptoms, quality of life, and mobility. Analysis included comparing outcomes related to different diets within and between groups. Adherence to the MS diet was not associated with a greater quality of life, less disability, a lower Symptom Score, or faster walking speed compared to other diets. Alternately, the participants from the Mediterranean diet region as a whole (µ = 32.65 (SD = 11.37, SEM = 2.37, p = 0.05) had a significantly greater QoL (µ = 60, p = 0.05) and a lower MS symptom score, µ = 32.65 (11.37), p = 0.0029. A decline of symptoms was observed in all diet groups over 3 months with the most dramatic decline observed in participants from the Eastern Mediterranean diet region. The main effect for the within-subjects factor was significant, F(3, 1056) = 55.95, p < 0.001, indicating that there were significant differences between the groups. Full article
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Article
Mobile Application for Promoting Gluten-Free Diet Self-Management in Adolescents with Celiac Disease: Proof-of-Concept Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1401; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051401 - 21 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic disease treated by maintaining and managing a lifelong restrictive gluten-free diet. The purpose of this study was to develop a mobile application, Plan My C-Day, to promote self-management skills among youth with CD during adolescence—a time when [...] Read more.
Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic disease treated by maintaining and managing a lifelong restrictive gluten-free diet. The purpose of this study was to develop a mobile application, Plan My C-Day, to promote self-management skills among youth with CD during adolescence—a time when decreased adherence often occurs—and examine its usability among adolescents with CD. Plan My C-Day contains three simulations of activities involving eating out and actions to take when preparing for these events. It was developed and pilot tested by 13 adolescents with CD. Application use and user perception data were collected and analyzed. Participants chose 160 actions within the simulations. For over 75% of participants, the time to complete the simulation decreased from the first to the third (last) simulation by an average of 50%. The average reported usability perception was 3.71 on a scale of 1 to 5, with system ease of use and ease of learning obtaining the highest scores. This study demonstrated that the Plan My C-Day mobile application’s self-management content, features, and functions operated well and that the simulations were easy to understand and complete. Further development will include the option to add self-created activities and adaptation to different languages and cultures. Full article
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Article
Prevalence of Wheat/Gluten-Related Disorders and Gluten-Free Diet in Paraguay: An Online Survey-Based Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 396; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020396 - 27 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 945
Abstract
Gluten-related disorders (GRDs) are increasing around the world, but their magnitude and relevance remain unknown in most Latin American countries. Thus, an online survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of GRDs as well as adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) in Paraguayan [...] Read more.
Gluten-related disorders (GRDs) are increasing around the world, but their magnitude and relevance remain unknown in most Latin American countries. Thus, an online survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of GRDs as well as adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) in Paraguayan adult population. There were 1058 individuals surveyed using a validated questionnaire (response rate of 93.9%). The self-reported prevalence rates were as follows (95% CI): gluten sensitivity (GS), 10.30% (8.53–12.29); non-celiac GS (NCGS), 5.19% (3.94–6.71); physician-diagnosed celiac disease (PD-CD), 3.11% (2.15–4.35); wheat allergy (WA), 2.07% (1.30–3.13); and adherence to GFD, 15.69% (13.55–18.02). Excluding CD, more women than men met the criteria for GRDs, adverse food reactions, and GFD (p < 0.05). Eight respondents reported the coexistence of NCGS with PD-CD and/or WA. Most cases on a GFD indicated medical/dietitian advice for following the diet (68.07%). Non-self-reported GS individuals indicated weight control (46.4%) and the notion that the GFD is healthier (20.2%) as the main motivations for following the diet. GRDs are not uncommon in Paraguayan adult population. It seems that there is awareness about GRDs and the GFD, but training about the diagnosis of GRDs is desirable because of the informed overlapping diagnoses of CD or WA with NCGS. Future studies involving face-to-face interviews are necessary. Full article
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Review

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Review
Gluten and FODMAPs Relationship with Mental Disorders: Systematic Review
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1894; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061894 - 31 May 2021
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Abstract
Nowadays, gluten and FODMAP food components (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) are increasingly studied due to their possible relation with extraintestinal-associated conditions. In recent years, gluten-free diets (GFD) and low-FODMAP diets (LFD) are becoming more popular not only in order to avoid [...] Read more.
Nowadays, gluten and FODMAP food components (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) are increasingly studied due to their possible relation with extraintestinal-associated conditions. In recent years, gluten-free diets (GFD) and low-FODMAP diets (LFD) are becoming more popular not only in order to avoid the food components that cause intolerances or allergies in some people, but also due to the direct influence of marketing movements or diet trends on feeding habits. Likewise, neurological and psychiatric diseases are currently of increasing importance in developed countries. For this reason, a bibliographic systematic review has been carried out to analyse whether there is a pathophysiological relationship between the dietary intake of gluten or FODMAPs with mental disorders. This review collects 13 clinical and randomized controlled trials, based on the PRISMA statement, which have been published in the last ten years. Based on these results, limiting or ruling out gluten or FODMAPs in the diet might be beneficial for symptoms such as depression, anxiety (7 out of 7 articles found any positive effect), or cognition deficiency (improvements in several cognition test measurements in one trial), and to a lesser extent for schizophrenia and the autism spectrum. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to obtain completely reliable conclusions. Full article
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