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Review

Gluten and FODMAPs Relationship with Mental Disorders: Systematic Review

1
Gluten Analysis Laboratory of the University of the Basque Country, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, 01006 Vitoria, Spain
2
GLUTEN3S Research Group, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, 01006 Vitoria, Spain
3
Bioaraba, Nutrición y Seguridad Alimentaria, 01006 Vitoria, Spain
4
Centro Integral de Atención a Mayores San Prudencio, 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co-first author, these authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Luis Rodrigo
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1894; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061894
Received: 13 May 2021 / Revised: 28 May 2021 / Accepted: 28 May 2021 / Published: 31 May 2021
Nowadays, gluten and FODMAP food components (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) are increasingly studied due to their possible relation with extraintestinal-associated conditions. In recent years, gluten-free diets (GFD) and low-FODMAP diets (LFD) are becoming more popular not only in order to avoid the food components that cause intolerances or allergies in some people, but also due to the direct influence of marketing movements or diet trends on feeding habits. Likewise, neurological and psychiatric diseases are currently of increasing importance in developed countries. For this reason, a bibliographic systematic review has been carried out to analyse whether there is a pathophysiological relationship between the dietary intake of gluten or FODMAPs with mental disorders. This review collects 13 clinical and randomized controlled trials, based on the PRISMA statement, which have been published in the last ten years. Based on these results, limiting or ruling out gluten or FODMAPs in the diet might be beneficial for symptoms such as depression, anxiety (7 out of 7 articles found any positive effect), or cognition deficiency (improvements in several cognition test measurements in one trial), and to a lesser extent for schizophrenia and the autism spectrum. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to obtain completely reliable conclusions. View Full-Text
Keywords: gluten-free diet; low FODMAP diet; clinical trial; randomized controlled trial; depression; anxiety; cognition; Alzheimer’s disease; schizophrenia; autism spectrum gluten-free diet; low FODMAP diet; clinical trial; randomized controlled trial; depression; anxiety; cognition; Alzheimer’s disease; schizophrenia; autism spectrum
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MDPI and ACS Style

Aranburu, E.; Matias, S.; Simón, E.; Larretxi, I.; Martínez, O.; Bustamante, M.Á.; Fernández-Gil, M.d.P.; Miranda, J. Gluten and FODMAPs Relationship with Mental Disorders: Systematic Review. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1894. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061894

AMA Style

Aranburu E, Matias S, Simón E, Larretxi I, Martínez O, Bustamante MÁ, Fernández-Gil MdP, Miranda J. Gluten and FODMAPs Relationship with Mental Disorders: Systematic Review. Nutrients. 2021; 13(6):1894. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061894

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aranburu, Egoitz, Silvia Matias, Edurne Simón, Idoia Larretxi, Olaia Martínez, María Á. Bustamante, María d.P. Fernández-Gil, and Jonatan Miranda. 2021. "Gluten and FODMAPs Relationship with Mental Disorders: Systematic Review" Nutrients 13, no. 6: 1894. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061894

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