E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Tea in Health and Disease"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2018)

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Q. Ping Dou

Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute and Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: green tea; natural products; proteasome inhibitors; molecular targeting; cancer prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tea, made from the leaves of the Camellia senenisis plant, is the second most consumed beverage worldwide after water. Accumulating evidence from cellular, animal, epidemiological and clinical studies have linked tea consumption to various health benefits, such as chemoprevention of cancers, chronic inflammation, heart and liver diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, etc. Although such health benefits have not been consistently observed in some intervention trials, positive results from clinical trials have provided direct evidence supporting the cancer-protective effect of green tea. In addition, numerous mechanisms of action have been suggested to contribute to tea’s disease-preventive effects. Furthermore, effects of the processing and storage of tea, as well as additives on tea’s properties have been investigated.

The objective of this proposed Special Issue, “Tea in Health and Disease”, is to publish selected review and research papers detailing the anti-cancer and anti-disease effects of tea, as well as the involved potential molecular targets, biological pathways and mechanisms of action. Articles reporting strategies on how to retain tea’s beneficial activities during its processing and storage will also be included. I encourage you to submit your manuscripts that fit these objectives and topics of this Special Issue. Thank you.

Dr. Q. Ping Dou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Tea
  • Cancer
  • Diseases
  • Antioxidants
  • Chemoprevention
  • Flavonoids
  • Catechins
  • Polyphenols
  • Molecular targets
  • Tea processing and storage

Published Papers (14 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-14
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessEditorial
Tea in Health and Disease
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 929; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040929
Received: 19 April 2019 / Accepted: 23 April 2019 / Published: 25 April 2019
PDF Full-text (157 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tea, including green tea made from the leaves of the Camellia senenisis plant, is the second most consumed beverage worldwide after water, and is consumed by more than two-thirds of the world population [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle
Daily Green Tea Infusions in Hypercalciuric Renal Stone Patients: No Evidence for Increased Stone Risk Factors or Oxalate-Dependent Stones
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 256; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020256
Received: 11 December 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 24 January 2019
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (561 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Green tea is widely used as a ‘’healthy’’ beverage due to its high level of antioxidant polyphenol compounds. However tea is also known to contain significant amount of oxalate. The objective was to determine, in a cross-sectional observational study among a population of [...] Read more.
Green tea is widely used as a ‘’healthy’’ beverage due to its high level of antioxidant polyphenol compounds. However tea is also known to contain significant amount of oxalate. The objective was to determine, in a cross-sectional observational study among a population of 273 hypercalciuric stone-formers referred to our center for metabolic evaluation, whether daily green tea drinkers (n = 41) experienced increased stone risk factors (especially for oxalate) compared to non-drinkers. Stone risk factors and stone composition were analyzed according to green tea status and sex. In 24-h urine collection, the comparison between green tea drinkers and non-drinkers showed no difference for stone risk factors such as urine oxalate, calcium, urate, citrate, and pH. In females, the prevalence of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) and calcium phosphate stones, assessed by infrared analysis (IRS) was similar between green tea drinkers and non-drinkers, whereas prevalence of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones was strikingly decreased in green tea drinkers (0% vs. 42%, p = 0.04), with data in accordance with a decreased oxalate supersaturation index. In males, stone composition and supersaturation indexes were similar between the two groups. Our data show no evidence for increased stone risk factors or oxalate-dependent stones in daily green tea drinkers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Protection of UVB-Induced Photoaging by Fuzhuan-Brick Tea Aqueous Extract via MAPKs/Nrf2-Mediated Down-Regulation of MMP-1
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010060
Received: 1 November 2018 / Revised: 20 December 2018 / Accepted: 21 December 2018 / Published: 28 December 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4455 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation is viewed as the principal inducer of skin photo-aging, associated with acceleration of collagen degradation and upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The ethnic groups of southern/western China use Fuzhuan brick-tea (FBT) as a beverage and as a nutritional supplement. [...] Read more.
Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation is viewed as the principal inducer of skin photo-aging, associated with acceleration of collagen degradation and upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The ethnic groups of southern/western China use Fuzhuan brick-tea (FBT) as a beverage and as a nutritional supplement. In this study, we scrutinized the antagonistic effects of aqueous extract of Fuzhuan-brick tea (FBTA) on skin photo-aging in UVB-exposed human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells. FBTA exhibited strong antioxidant activity and quenched UVB-induced generation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) without showing any toxicity. FBTA was capable of combating oxidative stress by augmenting messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of both phase I and phase II detoxifying enzymes, especially heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), by upregulating the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated pathway in HaCaT cells via the phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). FBTA also downregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) while upregulating type I procollagen by modulating Nrf2 signaling in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells. Collectively, our results show that FBTA might be useful as a functional food while being a good candidate in the development of cosmetic products and medicines for the remedy of UVB-induced skin photo-aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Rosmarinic Acid, a Component of Rosemary Tea, Induced the Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis through Modulation of HDAC2 Expression in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1784; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111784
Received: 13 October 2018 / Revised: 13 November 2018 / Accepted: 15 November 2018 / Published: 16 November 2018
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (4456 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rosmarinic acid (RA), a main phenolic compound contained in rosemary which is used as tea, oil, medicine and so on, has been known to present anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer effects. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that play important roles in gene expression by [...] Read more.
Rosmarinic acid (RA), a main phenolic compound contained in rosemary which is used as tea, oil, medicine and so on, has been known to present anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer effects. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that play important roles in gene expression by removing the acetyl group from histone. The aberrant expression of HDAC in human tumors is related with the onset of human cancer. Especially, HDAC2, which belongs to HDAC class I composed of HDAC 1, 2, 3 and 8, has been reported to be highly expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) where it downregulates the expression of p53, resulting in an inhibition of apoptosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of RA in comparison with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), an HDAC inhibitor used as an anti-cancer agent, on survival and apoptosis of PCa cell lines, PC-3 and DU145, and the expression of HDAC. RA decreased the cell proliferation in cell viability assay, and inhibited the colony formation and tumor spheroid formation. Additionally, RA induced early- and late-stage apoptosis of PC-3 and DU145 cells in Annexin V assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. In western blot analysis, RA inhibited the expression of HDAC2, as SAHA did. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 were downregulated by RA, whereas p21 was upregulated. In addition, RA modulated the protein expression of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway-related genes, such as Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) (cleaved) via the upregulation of p53 derived from HDAC2 downregulation, leading to the increased apoptosis of PC-3 and DU145 cells. Taken together, treatment of RA to PCa cell lines inhibits the cell survival and induces cell apoptosis, and it can be used as a novel therapeutic agent toward PCa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Colon Bioaccessibility and Antioxidant Activity of White, Green and Black Tea Polyphenols Extract after In Vitro Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1711; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111711
Received: 15 October 2018 / Revised: 2 November 2018 / Accepted: 5 November 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1558 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The beneficial effects of the tea beverage are well-known and mainly attributed to polyphenols which, however, have poor bioaccessibility and bioavailability. The purpose of the present study was the evaluation of colon bioaccessibility and antioxidant activity of tea polyphenolic extract. An 80% methanolic [...] Read more.
The beneficial effects of the tea beverage are well-known and mainly attributed to polyphenols which, however, have poor bioaccessibility and bioavailability. The purpose of the present study was the evaluation of colon bioaccessibility and antioxidant activity of tea polyphenolic extract. An 80% methanolic extract (v/v) of tea polyphenols was obtained from green (GT), white (WT) and black tea (BT). Simulated gastrointestinal (GI) digestion was performed on acid-resistant capsules containing tea polyphenolic extract. The main tea polyphenols were monitored by HPLC-diode-array detector (DAD) method; in addition, Total Phenol Content (TPC) and antioxidant activity were evaluated. After GI digestion, the bioaccessibility in the colon stage was significantly increased compared to the duodenal stage for both tea polyphenols and TPC. Similarly, the antioxidant activity in the colon stage was significantly higher than that in the duodenal stage. Reasonably, these results could be attributable in vivo to the activity of gut microbiota, which is able to metabolize these compounds, generating metabolites with a greater antioxidant activity. Our results may guide the comprehension of the colon digestion of polyphenols, suggesting that, although poorly absorbed in the duodenum, they can exert their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in the lower gut, resulting in a novel strategy for the management of gut-related inflammatory diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Targeting the DNA Repair Endonuclease ERCC1-XPF with Green Tea Polyphenol Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) and Its Prodrug to Enhance Cisplatin Efficacy in Human Cancer Cells
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1644; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111644
Received: 8 October 2018 / Revised: 24 October 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 3 November 2018
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (3403 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The 5′-3′ structure-specific endonuclease ERCC1/XPF (Excision Repair Cross-Complementation Group 1/Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F) plays critical roles in the repair of cisplatin-induced DNA damage. As such, it has been identified as a potential pharmacological target for enhancing clinical response to platinum-based chemotherapy. The goal [...] Read more.
The 5′-3′ structure-specific endonuclease ERCC1/XPF (Excision Repair Cross-Complementation Group 1/Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F) plays critical roles in the repair of cisplatin-induced DNA damage. As such, it has been identified as a potential pharmacological target for enhancing clinical response to platinum-based chemotherapy. The goal of this study was to follow up on our previous identification of the compound NSC143099 as a potent inhibitor of ERCC1/XPF activity by performing an in silico screen to identify structural analogues that could inhibit ERCC1/XPF activity in vitro and in vivo. Using a fluorescence-based DNA-endonuclease incision assay, we identified the green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) as a potent inhibitor of ERCC1/XPF activity with an IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) in the nanomolar range in biochemical assays. Using DNA repair assays and clonogenic survival assays, we show that EGCG can inhibit DNA repair and enhance cisplatin sensitivity in human cancer cells. Finally, we show that a prodrug of EGCG, Pro-EGCG (EGCG octaacetate), can enhance response to platinum-based chemotherapy in vivo. Together these data support a novel target of EGCG in cancer cells, namely ERCC1/XPF. Our studies also corroborate previous observations that EGCG enhances sensitivity to cisplatin in multiple cancer types. Thus, EGCG or its prodrug makes an ideal candidate for further pharmacological development with the goal of enhancing cisplatin response in human tumors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Habitual Tea Consumption and Risk of Fracture in 0.5 Million Chinese Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1633; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111633
Received: 27 September 2018 / Revised: 20 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 2 November 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (423 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Background: Tea consumption may have favorable effects on risk of fracture. However, little is known about such association in Chinese adults. The aim of this study was to examine the association between tea consumption and risk of hospitalized fracture in Chinese adults. Methods: [...] Read more.
Background: Tea consumption may have favorable effects on risk of fracture. However, little is known about such association in Chinese adults. The aim of this study was to examine the association between tea consumption and risk of hospitalized fracture in Chinese adults. Methods: The present study included 453,625 participants from the China Kadoorie Biobank (CKB). Tea consumption was self-reported at baseline. Hospitalized fractures were ascertained through linkage with local health insurance claim databases. The results: During a median of 10.1 years of follow-up, we documented 12,130 cases of first-time any fracture hospitalizations, including 1376 cases of hip fracture. Compared with never tea consumers, daily tea consumption was associated with lower risk of any fracture (hazard ratio (HR): 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83, 0.93). Statistically significant reduced risk of hip fracture was shown among daily consumers who most commonly drank green tea (HR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.97) and those who had drunk tea for more than 30 years (HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.87). Our conclusions: Habitual tea consumption was associated with moderately decreased risk of any fracture hospitalizations. Participants with decades of tea consumption and those who preferred green tea were also associated with lower risk of hip fracture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Stress-Reducing Function of Matcha Green Tea in Animal Experiments and Clinical Trials
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1468; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101468
Received: 14 September 2018 / Revised: 4 October 2018 / Accepted: 9 October 2018 / Published: 10 October 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1786 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Theanine, a major amino acid in green tea, exhibits a stress-reducing effect in mice and humans. Matcha, which is essentially theanine-rich powdered green tea, is abundant in caffeine. Caffeine has a strong antagonistic effect against theanine. The stress-reducing effect of matcha was examined [...] Read more.
Theanine, a major amino acid in green tea, exhibits a stress-reducing effect in mice and humans. Matcha, which is essentially theanine-rich powdered green tea, is abundant in caffeine. Caffeine has a strong antagonistic effect against theanine. The stress-reducing effect of matcha was examined with an animal experiment and a clinical trial. The stress-reducing effect of matcha marketed in Japan and abroad was assessed based on its composition. The stress-reducing effect of matcha in mice was evaluated as suppressed adrenal hypertrophy using territorially-based loaded stress. High contents of theanine and arginine in matcha exhibited a high stress-reducing effect. However, an effective stress-reducing outcome was only possible when the molar ratio of caffeine and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to theanine and arginine was less than two. Participants (n = 39) consumed test-matcha, which was expected to have a stress-reducing effect, or placebo-matcha, where no effect was expected. Anxiety, a reaction to stress, was significantly lower in the test-matcha group than in the placebo group. To predict mental function of each matcha, both the quantity of theanine and the ratios of caffeine, EGCG, and arginine against theanine need to be verified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Polyphenols in Liubao Tea Can Prevent CCl4-Induced Hepatic Damage in Mice through Its Antioxidant Capacities
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1280; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091280
Received: 1 August 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 7 September 2018 / Published: 10 September 2018
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (3104 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study investigated the preventive effect of polyphenols in Liubao tea (PLT) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury in mice. The mice were initially treated with PLT, followed by induction of liver injury using 10 mL/kg CCl4. Then [...] Read more.
The present study investigated the preventive effect of polyphenols in Liubao tea (PLT) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury in mice. The mice were initially treated with PLT, followed by induction of liver injury using 10 mL/kg CCl4. Then liver and serum indices, as well as the expression levels of related messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and proteins in liver tissues were measured. The results showed that PLT reduces the liver quality and indices of mice with liver injury. PLT also downregulates aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), triglycerides (TGs), and malondialdehyde (MDA), and upregulates superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the sera of mice with liver injury. PLT also reduces serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF- α ), and interferon- γ (IFN- γ ) cytokines in mice with liver injury. Pathological morphological observation also shows that PLT reduces CCl4-induced central venous differentiation of liver tissues and liver cell damage. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot also confirm that PLT upregulates the mRNA and protein expressions of Gu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, catalase (CAT), GSH-Px, and nuclear factor of κ -light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor- α (I κ B- α ) in liver tissues, and downregulates the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and nuclear factor κ -light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF- κ B). Meanwhile, PLT also raised the phosphorylated (p)-NF- κ B p65 and cytochrome P450 reductase protein expression in liver injury mice. The components of PLT include gallic acid, catechin, caffeine, epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), gallocatechin gallate (GCG), and epicatechin gallate (ECG), which possibly have a wide range of biological activities. Thus, PLT imparts preventive effects against CCl4-induced liver injury, which is similar to silymarin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Epigallocatechin-3-gallate and 6-OH-11-O-Hydroxyphenanthrene Limit BE(2)-C Neuroblastoma Cell Growth and Neurosphere Formation In Vitro
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1141; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091141
Received: 9 July 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 20 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2465 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We conducted an in vitro study combining a rexinoid, 6-OH-11-O-hydroxyphenanthrene (IIF), and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which is the main catechin of green tea, on BE(2)-C, a neuroblastoma cell line representative of the high-risk group of patients. Neuroblastoma is the most common malignancy of childhood: [...] Read more.
We conducted an in vitro study combining a rexinoid, 6-OH-11-O-hydroxyphenanthrene (IIF), and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which is the main catechin of green tea, on BE(2)-C, a neuroblastoma cell line representative of the high-risk group of patients. Neuroblastoma is the most common malignancy of childhood: high-risk patients, having N-MYC over-expression, undergo aggressive therapy and show high mortality or an increased risk of secondary malignancies. Retinoids are used in neuroblastoma therapy with incomplete success: the association of a second molecule might improve the efficacy. BE(2)-C cells were treated by EGCG and IIF, individually or in combination: cell viability, as evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, was reduced, EGCG+IIF being the most effective treatment. Apoptosis occurred and the EGCG+IIF treatment decreased N-MYC protein expression and molecular markers of invasion (MMP-2, MMP-9 and COX-2). Zymography demonstrated nearly 50% inhibition of MMP activity. When BE(2)-C cells were grown in non-adherent conditions to enrich the tumor-initiating cell population, BE(2)-C-spheres were obtained. After 48 h and 72 h treatment, EGCG+IIF limited BE(2)-C-sphere formation and elicited cell death with a reduction of N-MYC expression. We concluded that the association of EGCG to IIF might be applied without toxic effects to overcome the incomplete success of retinoid treatments in neuroblastoma patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Tea Polyphenols in Promotion of Human Health
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010039
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 16 December 2018 / Accepted: 21 December 2018 / Published: 25 December 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (285 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tea is the most widely used beverage worldwide. Japanese and Chinese people have been drinking tea for centuries and in Asia, it is the most consumed beverage besides water. It is a rich source of pharmacologically active molecules which have been implicated to [...] Read more.
Tea is the most widely used beverage worldwide. Japanese and Chinese people have been drinking tea for centuries and in Asia, it is the most consumed beverage besides water. It is a rich source of pharmacologically active molecules which have been implicated to provide diverse health benefits. The three major forms of tea are green, black and oolong tea based on the degree of fermentation. The composition of tea differs with the species, season, leaves, climate, and horticultural practices. Polyphenols are the major active compounds present in teas. The catechins are the major polyphenolic compounds in green tea, which include epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), epigallocatechin, epicatechin-3-gallate and epicatechin, gallocatechins and gallocatechin gallate. EGCG is the predominant and most studied catechin in green tea. There are numerous evidences from cell culture and animal studies that tea polyphenols have beneficial effects against several pathological diseases including cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The polyphenolic compounds present in black tea include theaflavins and thearubigins. In this review article, we will summarize recent studies documenting the role of tea polyphenols in the prevention of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Open AccessReview
Molecular Targets of Epigallocatechin—Gallate (EGCG): A Special Focus on Signal Transduction and Cancer
Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1936; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121936
Received: 7 November 2018 / Revised: 30 November 2018 / Accepted: 4 December 2018 / Published: 6 December 2018
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (852 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Green tea is a beverage that is widely consumed worldwide and is believed to exert effects on different diseases, including cancer. The major components of green tea are catechins, a family of polyphenols. Among them, epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant and biologically [...] Read more.
Green tea is a beverage that is widely consumed worldwide and is believed to exert effects on different diseases, including cancer. The major components of green tea are catechins, a family of polyphenols. Among them, epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant and biologically active. EGCG is widely studied for its anti-cancer properties. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms explaining its action have not been completely understood, yet. EGCG is effective in vivo at micromolar concentrations, suggesting that its action is mediated by interaction with specific targets that are involved in the regulation of crucial steps of cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic spread. Recently, several proteins have been identified as EGCG direct interactors. Among them, the trans-membrane receptor 67LR has been identified as a high affinity EGCG receptor. 67LR is a master regulator of many pathways affecting cell proliferation or apoptosis, also regulating cancer stem cells (CSCs) activity. EGCG was also found to be interacting directly with Pin1, TGFR-II, and metalloproteinases (MMPs) (mainly MMP2 and MMP9), which respectively regulate EGCG-dependent inhibition of NF-kB, epithelial-mesenchimal transaction (EMT) and cellular invasion. EGCG interacts with DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), which modulates epigenetic changes. The bulk of this novel knowledge provides information about the mechanisms of action of EGCG and may explain its onco-suppressive function. The identification of crucial signalling pathways that are related to cancer onset and progression whose master regulators interacts with EGCG may disclose intriguing pharmacological targets, and eventually lead to novel combined treatments in which EGCG acts synergistically with known drugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Health Benefits of Bioactive Compounds from the Genus Ilex, a Source of Traditional Caffeinated Beverages
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1682; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111682
Received: 10 October 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 1 November 2018 / Published: 5 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (891 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tea and coffee are caffeinated beverages commonly consumed around the world in daily life. Tea from Camellia sinensis is widely available and is a good source of caffeine and other bioactive compounds (e.g., polyphenols and carotenoids). Other tea-like beverages, such as those from [...] Read more.
Tea and coffee are caffeinated beverages commonly consumed around the world in daily life. Tea from Camellia sinensis is widely available and is a good source of caffeine and other bioactive compounds (e.g., polyphenols and carotenoids). Other tea-like beverages, such as those from the genus Ilex, the large-leaved Kudingcha (Ilex latifolia Thunb and Ilex kudingcha C.J. Tseng), Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil), Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria), and Guayusa (Ilex guayusa Loes) are also traditional drinks, with lesser overall usage, but have attracted much recent attention and have been subjected to further study. This review summarizes the distribution, composition, and health benefits of caffeinated beverages from the genus Ilex. Plants of this genus mainly contain polyphenols and alkaloids, and show diverse health benefits, which, as well as supporting their further popularization as beverages, may also lead to potential applications in the pharmaceutical or nutraceutical industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Association of Tea Consumption with Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease and Anti-Beta-Amyloid Effects of Tea
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 655; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050655
Received: 4 April 2018 / Revised: 16 May 2018 / Accepted: 21 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (558 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is attracting growing concern because of an increasing patient population among the elderly. Tea consumption is considered a natural complementary therapy for neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, epidemiological studies on the association between tea consumption and the reduced [...] Read more.
Neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is attracting growing concern because of an increasing patient population among the elderly. Tea consumption is considered a natural complementary therapy for neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, epidemiological studies on the association between tea consumption and the reduced risk of AD are reviewed and the anti-amyloid effects of related bioactivities in tea are summarized. Future challenges regarding the role of tea in preventing AD are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top