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Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1468; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101468

Stress-Reducing Function of Matcha Green Tea in Animal Experiments and Clinical Trials

1
Department of Neurophysiology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan
2
Tea Science Center, Graduate School of Integrated Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan
3
Department of Drug Evaluation & Informatics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan
4
Department of Functional Plant Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529, Japan
5
Institute of Fruit Tree and Tea Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Shimada 428-8501, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 September 2018 / Revised: 4 October 2018 / Accepted: 9 October 2018 / Published: 10 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea in Health and Disease)
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Abstract

Theanine, a major amino acid in green tea, exhibits a stress-reducing effect in mice and humans. Matcha, which is essentially theanine-rich powdered green tea, is abundant in caffeine. Caffeine has a strong antagonistic effect against theanine. The stress-reducing effect of matcha was examined with an animal experiment and a clinical trial. The stress-reducing effect of matcha marketed in Japan and abroad was assessed based on its composition. The stress-reducing effect of matcha in mice was evaluated as suppressed adrenal hypertrophy using territorially-based loaded stress. High contents of theanine and arginine in matcha exhibited a high stress-reducing effect. However, an effective stress-reducing outcome was only possible when the molar ratio of caffeine and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to theanine and arginine was less than two. Participants (n = 39) consumed test-matcha, which was expected to have a stress-reducing effect, or placebo-matcha, where no effect was expected. Anxiety, a reaction to stress, was significantly lower in the test-matcha group than in the placebo group. To predict mental function of each matcha, both the quantity of theanine and the ratios of caffeine, EGCG, and arginine against theanine need to be verified. View Full-Text
Keywords: adrenal hypertrophy; anxiety; caffeine; catechin; green tea; matcha; salivary α-amylase activity; stress-reduction; theanine adrenal hypertrophy; anxiety; caffeine; catechin; green tea; matcha; salivary α-amylase activity; stress-reduction; theanine
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Unno, K.; Furushima, D.; Hamamoto, S.; Iguchi, K.; Yamada, H.; Morita, A.; Horie, H.; Nakamura, Y. Stress-Reducing Function of Matcha Green Tea in Animal Experiments and Clinical Trials. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1468.

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