Special Issue "Nutrition, Nutraceuticals and Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention and Fight against Inflammation"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2022 | Viewed by 2030

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Maciej Banach
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Hypertension, Chair of Nephrology and Hypertension, Medical University of Lodz, 93-338 Lodz, Poland
Interests: vitamin D; natural product; vascular biology; atherogenesis; CKD
Prof. Dr. Amirhossein Sahebkar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Applied Biomedical Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad 9177948564, Iran
Interests: clinical science; management of lipid disorders; medicinal properties of natural products; nanoliposomes in medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, the topic of natural products and their different applications is very hot and debatable. We might see numerous papers presenting different properties of nutraceuticals and/or food supplements in different at risk patients. Unfortunately, most of these data come from small cohort studies, and the final conclusions do not give us clear answers on the real benefits and applications of nutraceuticals. Only well-established and designed prospective studies, randomized controlled trials with relatively high numbers of patients, meta-analyses and post-marketing consumer data, with special emphasis on real-word data, might give us the whole picture of both the effectiveness and safety of nutraceuticals, and might allow to select the group of patients that might really benefit from them. The recent numerous failures are also associated with the lack of standardized methods and algorithms on the production process, what should be also always taken into account while deciding to administer the given nutraceutical. Finally, the pandemic has shown that we have hundreds of different data on possible application of nutraceuticals in COVID-19 patients, in the end with most of them without any real clinical benefit. Therefore we need to all apply for better data for nutraceuticals, as it is the only way to finally establish them as a solid part of the recommendations for different chronic diseases, which is especially important now, when we have enormous health debts linked to cardiovascular and oncological diseases especially.

Prof. Dr. Maciej Banach
Prof. Dr. Amirhossein Sahebkar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • diet
  • natural products
  • nutraceuticals
  • cardiovascular risk
  • primary prevention
  • statin non-adherence

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Investigation of the Effect of Curcumin on Protein Targets in NAFLD Using Bioinformatic Analysis
Nutrients 2022, 14(7), 1331; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14071331 - 22 Mar 2022
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Abstract
BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent metabolic disorder. Defects in function/expression of genes/proteins are critical in initiation/progression of NAFLD. Natural products may modulate these genes/proteins. Curcumin improves steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis progression. Here, bioinformatic tools, gene–drug and gene-disease databases were [...] Read more.
BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent metabolic disorder. Defects in function/expression of genes/proteins are critical in initiation/progression of NAFLD. Natural products may modulate these genes/proteins. Curcumin improves steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis progression. Here, bioinformatic tools, gene–drug and gene-disease databases were utilized to explore targets, interactions, and pathways through which curcumin could impact NAFLD. METHODS: Significant curcumin–protein interaction was identified (high-confidence:0.7) in the STITCH database. Identified proteins were investigated to determine association with NAFLD. gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) were analyzed for significantly involved targets (p < 0.01). Specificity of obtained targets with NAFLD was estimated and investigated in Tissue/Cells–gene associations (PanglaoDB Augmented 2021, Mouse Gene Atlas) and Disease–gene association-based EnrichR algorithms (Jensen DISEASES, DisGeNET). RESULTS: Two collections were constructed: 227 protein–curcumin interactions and 95 NAFLD-associated genes. By Venn diagram, 14 significant targets were identified, and their biological pathways evaluated. Based on gene ontology, most targets involved stress and lipid metabolism. KEGG revealed chemical carcinogenesis, the AGE-RAGE signaling pathway in diabetic complications and NAFLD as the most common significant pathways. Specificity to diseases database (EnrichR algorithm) revealed specificity for steatosis/steatohepatitis. CONCLUSION: Curcumin may improve, or inhibit, progression of NAFLD through activation/inhibition of NAFLD-related genes. Full article
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Article
Citrus junos Tanaka Peel Extract and Its Bioactive Naringin Reduce Fine Dust-Induced Respiratory Injury Markers in BALB/c Male Mice
Nutrients 2022, 14(5), 1101; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14051101 - 05 Mar 2022
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Abstract
Particulate matter (PM) 10 refers to fine dust with a diameter of less than 10 µm and induces apoptosis and inflammatory responses through oxidative stress. Citrus junos Tanaka is a citrus fruit and contains bioactive flavonoids including naringin. In the present study, we [...] Read more.
Particulate matter (PM) 10 refers to fine dust with a diameter of less than 10 µm and induces apoptosis and inflammatory responses through oxidative stress. Citrus junos Tanaka is a citrus fruit and contains bioactive flavonoids including naringin. In the present study, we aimed to identify the preventive effect of Citrus junos Tanaka peel extract (CPE) against PM10-induced lung injury. As a proof of concept, NCI-H460 cells were treated with CPE (800 μg/mL, 12 h) in conjunction with PM10 to examine intracellular antioxidative capacity in the pulmonary system. In an in vivo model, male BALB/c mice (n = 8/group) were randomly assigned into five groups: NEG (saline-treated), POS (PM10 only), NAR (PM10 + naringin, 100 mg/kg), CPL (PM10 + CPE low, 100 mg/kg), and CPH (PM10 + CPE high, 400 mg/kg). Intervention groups received dietary supplementations for 7 days followed by PM10 exposure (100 mg/kg, intranasal instillation). Compared to the NEG, the CPE decreased to 22% of the ROS generation and significantly increased cell viability in vitro. The histological assessments confirmed that pulmonary damages were alleviated in the PM10 + CPL group compared to the POS. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-κB/apoptosis signaling-related markers were decreased in the PM10 + CPL group compared to the POS. These results indicated that CPE showed promising efficacy in preventing pulmonary injuries in vivo. Such protection can be explained by the anti-oxidative capacity of CPE, likely due to its bioactives, including naringin (7.74 mg/g CPE). Follow-up human intervention, as well as population-level studies, will further shed light on the preventive efficacy of CPE against pulmonary damage in humans. Full article
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Review

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Review
Targeting Cardiovascular Diseases by Flavonols: An Update
Nutrients 2022, 14(7), 1439; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14071439 - 30 Mar 2022
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Abstract
Flavonols are one of the most plentiful flavonoid subclasses found in natural products and are extensively used as dietary supplements. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the cardioprotective properties of flavonols, especially quercetin. This group of substances exerts positive impacts [...] Read more.
Flavonols are one of the most plentiful flavonoid subclasses found in natural products and are extensively used as dietary supplements. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the cardioprotective properties of flavonols, especially quercetin. This group of substances exerts positive impacts primarily due to their antiatherogenic, antithrombotic, and antioxidant activities. The potential of flavonols to promote vasodilation and regulation of apoptotic processes in the endothelium are other beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. Despite promising experimental findings, randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses have yielded inconsistent results on the influence of these substances on human cardiovascular parameters. Thus, this review aims to summarize the most recent clinical data on the intake of these substances and their effects on the cardiovascular system. The present study will help clinicians and other healthcare workers understand the value of flavonol supplementation in both subjects at risk for cardiovascular disease and patients with cardiovascular diseases. Full article
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