Special Issue "Nutrition for Anemia"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Javier Diaz-Castro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: Iron homeostasis; Mineral metabolism; Oxidative stress; DNA stabilty; Early programming; Inflammatory signalling; Nutraceuticals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Iron deficiency is extremely common and is the most widespread nutritional deficiency in the world, therefore any nutritional strategy to overcome this pathology can be of high interest. To more fully understand iron deficiency anemia, consideration must be directed toward concepts of iron supply and demand for the production of erythrocytes. Erythropoiesis-related demands for iron are created by three variables: tissue oxygenation, erythrocyte turnover, and erythrocyte loss from hemorrhage. Anaemia takes place when the levels of Fe decrease or the requirements overcome the contribution of the intake that is provided in the diet, so the Fe storages of the organism are depleted. There is no doubt that the Fe deficiency is the major cause of the great majority of anaemias although other minerals or vitamins can be also responsible of this pathology. The Fe-deficiency anaemia is characterized by low levels of serum Fe and hemoglobin (Hb), reduction of the hematocrit and increased levels of platelets, low percentage of transferrin saturation, decrease of serum ferritin and a drastic increase in total Fe binding capacity. In addition, the chemical properties of Fe render it a potential hazard within the organism in that ferrous Fe can catalyze the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn can lead to peroxidation and radical chain reactions with molecular damage. Regulation of ROS levels and oxidative stress is extremely important in erythropoiesis. Starting at the basophilic erythroblast stage, erythroid precursors synthesize large amounts of Hb, which require haem as a prosthetic group. Thus, Fe uptake and homeostasis for haem biosynthesis also increases, potentially generating ROS through the Fenton reaction. On this topic, you are invited to submit proposals for manuscripts that fit the objectives and the topics of this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Javier Diaz-Castro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Iron Homeostasis
  • Anemia
  • Iron supplementation
  • Oxidative stress
  • Nutrition
  • Hematological parameters
  • Biochemical parameters
  • Erythropoiesis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Effectiveness of Different Doses of Iron Supplementation and the Prenatal Determinants of Maternal Iron Status in Pregnant Spanish Women: ECLIPSES Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2418; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102418 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
Iron deficiency (ID), anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and excess iron (hemoconcentration) harm maternal–fetal health. We evaluated the effectiveness of different doses of iron supplementation adjusted for the initial levels of hemoglobin (Hb) on maternal iron status and described some associated prenatal determinants. [...] Read more.
Iron deficiency (ID), anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and excess iron (hemoconcentration) harm maternal–fetal health. We evaluated the effectiveness of different doses of iron supplementation adjusted for the initial levels of hemoglobin (Hb) on maternal iron status and described some associated prenatal determinants. The ECLIPSES study included 791 women, randomized into two groups: Stratum 1 (Hb = 110–130g/L, received 40 or 80mg iron daily) and Stratum 2 (Hb > 130g/L, received 20 or 40mg iron daily). Clinical, biochemical, and genetic information was collected during pregnancy, as were lifestyle and sociodemographic characteristics. In Stratum 1, using 80 mg/d instead of 40 mg/d protected against ID on week 36. Only women with ID on week 12 benefited from the protection against anemia and IDA by increasing Hb levels. In Stratum 2, using 20 mg/d instead of 40 mg/d reduced the risk of hemoconcentration in women with initial serum ferritin (SF) ≥ 15 μg/L, while 40 mg/d improved SF levels on week 36 in women with ID in early pregnancy. Mutations in the HFE gene increased the risk of hemoconcentration. Iron supplementation should be adjusted to early pregnancy levels of Hb and iron stores. Mutations of the HFE gene should be evaluated in women with high Hb levels in early pregnancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition for Anemia)
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Open AccessArticle
Fermented Goat Milk Consumption Enhances Brain Molecular Functions during Iron Deficiency Anemia Recovery
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2394; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102394 - 07 Oct 2019
Abstract
Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is one of the most prevalent nutritional deficiencies worldwide. Iron plays critical roles in nervous system development and cognition. Despite the known detrimental consequences of IDA on cognition, available studies do not provide molecular mechanisms elucidating the role of [...] Read more.
Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is one of the most prevalent nutritional deficiencies worldwide. Iron plays critical roles in nervous system development and cognition. Despite the known detrimental consequences of IDA on cognition, available studies do not provide molecular mechanisms elucidating the role of iron in brain functions during iron deficiency and recovery with dairy components. In this study, 100 male Wistar rats were placed on a pre-experimental period of 40 days and randomly divided in two groups: a control group receiving a normal-Fe diet, (45 mg/kg), and an Fe-deficient group receiving a low-Fe diet (5 mg/kg). At day 40, 10 rats per group were sacrificed to anemia control, and 80 rats were divided into eight experimental groups fed with fermented goat or cow milk-based diets, with normal Fe content or Fe overload (450 mg/kg) for 30 days. IDA decreased most of the parameters related to brain molecular functions, namely dopamine, irisin, MAO-A, oxytocin, β-endorphin, and α-MSH, while it increased synaptophysin. These alterations result in an impairment of brain molecular functions. In general, during anemia recovery, fermented goat milk diet consumption increased dopamine, oxytocin, serotonin, synaptophysin, and α-MSH, and decreased MAO-A and MAO-B, suggesting a potential neuroprotective effect in brain functions, which could enhance brain molecular functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition for Anemia)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Anemia of Inflammation with An Emphasis on Chronic Kidney Disease
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2424; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102424 - 11 Oct 2019
Abstract
Iron is vital for a vast variety of cellular processes and its homeostasis is strictly controlled and regulated. Nevertheless, disorders of iron metabolism are diverse and can be caused by insufficiency, overload or iron mal-distribution in tissues. Iron deficiency (ID) progresses to iron-deficiency [...] Read more.
Iron is vital for a vast variety of cellular processes and its homeostasis is strictly controlled and regulated. Nevertheless, disorders of iron metabolism are diverse and can be caused by insufficiency, overload or iron mal-distribution in tissues. Iron deficiency (ID) progresses to iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) after iron stores are depleted. Inflammation is of diverse etiology in anemia of chronic disease (ACD). It results in serum hypoferremia and tissue hyperferritinemia, which are caused by elevated serum hepcidin levels, and this underlies the onset of functional iron-deficiency anemia. Inflammation is also inhibitory to erythropoietin function and may directly increase hepcidin level, which influences iron metabolism. Consequently, immune responses orchestrate iron metabolism, aggravate iron sequestration and, ultimately, impair the processes of erythropoiesis. Hence, functional iron-deficiency anemia is a risk factor for several ailments, disorders and diseases. Therefore, therapeutic strategies depend on the symptoms, severity, comorbidities and the associated risk factors of anemia. Oral iron supplements can be employed to treat ID and mild anemia particularly, when gastrointestinal intolerance is minimal. Intravenous (IV) iron is the option in moderate and severe anemic conditions, for patients with compromised intestinal integrity, or when oral iron is refractory. Erythropoietin (EPO) is used to treat functional iron deficiency, and blood transfusion is restricted to refractory patients or in life-threatening emergency situations. Despite these interventions, many patients remain anemic and do not respond to conventional treatment approaches. However, various novel therapies are being developed to treat persistent anemia in patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition for Anemia)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1) Prof. Dr. Julio J. Ochoa

Affiliation: University of Granada, Department of Physiology.

E-mail: [email protected]

Tentative title: Coenzyme Q10 and hematological parameters during exercise.

2) Dr. Gladys Oluyemisi Latunde-Dada

Affiliation: Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences Division. King's College London

E-mail: [email protected] 

Tentative title: Iron homeostasis, anemia and renal disease.

3) Dr. Jorge Moreno-Fernandez

Affiliation: University of Granada, Department of Physiology.

E-mail: [email protected]

Tentative title: Iron homeostasis, anemia and goat milk consumption.

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