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Open AccessArticle

Is a Gluten-Free Diet Enough to Maintain Correct Micronutrients Status in Young Patients with Celiac Disease?

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Department of Physiology and “José MataixVerdú” Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INYTA), University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
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Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, Hospital Regional Universitario de Malaga, 29010 Málaga, Spain
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Pediatric Clinical Management Unit., “San Cecilio” University Hospital, 18016 Granada, Spain
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Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), 18071 Granada, Spain
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Department of Pediatrics, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
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Biosanitary Research Institute, 18071 Granada, Spain
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Maternal and Child Health Network, Carlos III Health Institute, 28029 Madrid, Spain
8
Pediatric Clinical Management Unit. “Virgen de las Nieves” University Hospital, 18071 Granada, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 844; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030844
Received: 28 February 2020 / Revised: 18 March 2020 / Accepted: 19 March 2020 / Published: 21 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition for Anemia)
The current study assesses whether the use of a gluten-free diet (GFD) is sufficient for maintaining correct iron status in children with celiac disease (CD). The study included 101 children. The celiac group (n = 68) included children with CD, with long (> 6 months) (n = 47) or recent (< 6 months) (n = 21) adherence to a GFD. The control group (n = 43) included healthy children. Dietary assessment was performed by a food frequency questionnaire and a 3-day food record. Celiac children had lower iron intake than controls, especially at the beginning of GFD (p < 0.01). The group CD-GFD >6 months showed a higher intake of cobalamin, meat derivatives and fish compared to that of CD-GFD <6 months (all, p < 0.05). The control group showed a higher consumption of folate, iron, magnesium, selenium and meat derivatives than that of children CD-GFD >6 months (all, p < 0.05). Control children also showed a higher consumption of folate and iron compared to that of children CD-GFD <6 months (both, p < 0.05). The diet of celiac children was nutritionally less balanced than that of the control. Participation of dietitians is necessary in the management of CD to guide the GFD as well as assess the inclusion of iron supplementation and other micronutrients that may be deficient. View Full-Text
Keywords: celiac disease; gluten-free diet; nutritional adequacy; iron deficiency anemia; children celiac disease; gluten-free diet; nutritional adequacy; iron deficiency anemia; children
MDPI and ACS Style

Nestares, T.; Martín-Masot, R.; Labella, A.; Aparicio, V.A.; Flor-Alemany, M.; López-Frías, M.; Maldonado, J. Is a Gluten-Free Diet Enough to Maintain Correct Micronutrients Status in Young Patients with Celiac Disease? Nutrients 2020, 12, 844.

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