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Special Issue "Nutrients Intake and Hypertension"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Francesco Fantin

Department of Medicine, Section of Geriatric Medicine, Piazzale Stefani 1, University of Verona, 37126 Verona, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hypertension; nutrients intake; diet

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hypertension is a major health problem worldwide, increasing cardiovascular (CV) risk and mortality.

Together with pharmacological treatments, non-pharmacological approaches, such as nutrient intake modifications, play a very important role in optimizing treatment.

A link has been shown between hypertension and body weight, as well as dietary habits.

The aim of this Special Issue is to improve the acknowledgment of the relationships between some nutrients and hypertension, and, moreover, the effects of different dietary approaches on hypertension regulation from different points of view.

Potential topics may include:

  • Weight loss and Hypertension
  • Mediterranean diet and Hypertension
  • Aminoacids and Hypertension
  • Protein Intake and Hypertension in CKD patients
  • Salt Intake and Hypertension

Assoc. Prof. Francesco Fantin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Cod Residual Protein Prevented Blood Pressure Increase in Zucker fa/fa Rats, Possibly by Inhibiting Activities of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and Renin
Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1820; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121820
Received: 1 November 2018 / Revised: 9 November 2018 / Accepted: 20 November 2018 / Published: 22 November 2018
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Abstract
Hypertension is the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and prevention of high blood pressure through diet and lifestyle should be a preferred approach. High intake of fish is associated with lower blood pressure, possibly mediated through the proteins since peptides with angiotensin-converting [...] Read more.
Hypertension is the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and prevention of high blood pressure through diet and lifestyle should be a preferred approach. High intake of fish is associated with lower blood pressure, possibly mediated through the proteins since peptides with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting capacities have been identified in fish skin, backbone, and fillet. The effects of cod meals made from residual materials and fillet on blood pressure were investigated in obese Zucker fa/fa rats which spontaneously develop high blood pressure. Rats were fed diets containing water-soluble (stickwater) or water-insoluble (presscake) fractions of protein-rich meals from cod residual materials (head, gut, backbone with muscle residuals, skin, trimmings) or fillet. Rats were fed diets containing 25% of total protein from cod meal and 75% of protein from casein, or casein as the sole protein source (control group) for four weeks. Results show that a diet containing residual presscake meal with high gut content prevented blood pressure increase, and this cod residual meal also showed the strongest in vitro inhibitions of ACE and renin activities. In conclusion, a diet containing water-insoluble proteins (presscake meal) with high gut content prevented increase in blood pressure in obese Zucker fa/fa rats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients Intake and Hypertension)
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Open AccessArticle Hesperidin Prevents Nitric Oxide Deficiency-Induced Cardiovascular Remodeling in Rats via Suppressing TGF-β1 and MMPs Protein Expression
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1549; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101549
Received: 21 September 2018 / Revised: 12 October 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
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Abstract
Hesperidin is a major flavonoid isolated from citrus fruits that exhibits several biological activities. This study aims to evaluate the effect of hesperidin on cardiovascular remodeling induced by n-nitro l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were [...] Read more.
Hesperidin is a major flavonoid isolated from citrus fruits that exhibits several biological activities. This study aims to evaluate the effect of hesperidin on cardiovascular remodeling induced by n-nitro l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with l-NAME (40 mg/kg), l-NAME plus hesperidin (15 mg/kg), hesperidin (30 mg/kg), or captopril (2.5 mg/kg) for five weeks (n = 8/group). Hesperidin or captopril significantly prevented the development of hypertension in l-NAME rats. l-NAME-induced cardiac remodeling, i.e., increases in wall thickness, cross-sectional area (CSA), and fibrosis in the left ventricular and vascular remodeling, i.e., increases in wall thickness, CSA, vascular smooth muscle cells, and collagen deposition in the aorta were attenuated by hesperidin or captopril. These were associated with reduced oxidative stress markers, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), and enhancing plasma nitric oxide metabolite (NOx) in l-NAME treated groups. Furthermore, up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1 (TNF-R1) and TGF- β1 protein expression and the overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was suppressed in l-NAME rats treated with hesperidin or captopril. These data suggested that hesperidin had cardioprotective effects in l-NAME hypertensive rats. The possible mechanism may involve antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients Intake and Hypertension)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle The Inhibitory Effect of Ojeoksan on Early and Advanced Atherosclerosis
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1256; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091256
Received: 10 August 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 4 September 2018 / Published: 6 September 2018
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Abstract
Atherosclerosis is closely related to vascular dysfunction and hypertension. Ojeoksan (OJS), originally recorded in an ancient Korean medicinal book named “Donguibogam”, is a well-known, blended herbal formula. This study was carried out to investigate the beneficial effects of OJS on atherosclerosis in vitro [...] Read more.
Atherosclerosis is closely related to vascular dysfunction and hypertension. Ojeoksan (OJS), originally recorded in an ancient Korean medicinal book named “Donguibogam”, is a well-known, blended herbal formula. This study was carried out to investigate the beneficial effects of OJS on atherosclerosis in vitro and in vivo. Western-diet-fed apolipoprotein-E gene-deficient mice (ApoE −/−) were used for this study for 16 weeks, and their vascular dysfunction and inflammation were analyzed. OJS-treated ApoE −/− mice showed lowered blood pressure and glucose levels. The levels of metabolic parameters with hyperlipidemia attenuated following OJS administration. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed that treatment with OJS reduced atherosclerotic lesions. OJS also suppressed the expression of adhesion molecules and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) compared to Western-diet-fed ApoE −/− mice and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Expression levels of MicroRNAs (miRNA)-10a, -126 3p were increased in OJS-fed ApoE −/− mice. OJS significantly increased the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and protein kinase B (Akt), which are involved in nitric oxide (NO) production. OJS also regulated eNOS coupling by increasing the expression of endothelial GTP Cyclohydrolase-1 (GTPCH). Taken together, OJS has a protective effect on vascular inflammation via eNOS coupling-mediated NO production and might be a potential therapeutic agent for both early and advanced atherosclerosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients Intake and Hypertension)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview The Double-Edged Sword Effects of Maternal Nutrition in the Developmental Programming of Hypertension
Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1917; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121917
Received: 20 October 2018 / Revised: 22 November 2018 / Accepted: 30 November 2018 / Published: 4 December 2018
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Abstract
Hypertension is a growing global epidemic. Developmental programming resulting in hypertension can begin in early life. Maternal nutrition status has important implications as a double-edged sword in the developmental programming of hypertension. Imbalanced maternal nutrition causes offspring’s hypertension, while specific nutritional interventions during [...] Read more.
Hypertension is a growing global epidemic. Developmental programming resulting in hypertension can begin in early life. Maternal nutrition status has important implications as a double-edged sword in the developmental programming of hypertension. Imbalanced maternal nutrition causes offspring’s hypertension, while specific nutritional interventions during pregnancy and lactation may serve as reprogramming strategies to reverse programming processes and prevent the development of hypertension. In this review, we first summarize the human and animal data supporting the link between maternal nutrition and developmental programming of hypertension. This review also presents common mechanisms underlying nutritional programming-induced hypertension. This will be followed by studies documenting nutritional interventions as reprogramming strategies to protect against hypertension from developmental origins. The identification of ideal nutritional interventions for the prevention of hypertension development that begins early in life will have a lifelong impact, with profound savings in the global burden of hypertension. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients Intake and Hypertension)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Influence of Mediterranean Diet on Blood Pressure
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1700; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111700
Received: 16 October 2018 / Revised: 31 October 2018 / Accepted: 6 November 2018 / Published: 7 November 2018
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Abstract
Hypertension is the main risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. Some studies have reported that food typical of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), such as whole grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and extra virgin olive oil, have a favorable effect on the [...] Read more.
Hypertension is the main risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. Some studies have reported that food typical of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), such as whole grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and extra virgin olive oil, have a favorable effect on the risk of hypertension, whereas food not typical of this dietary pattern such as red meat, processed meat, and poultry has an unfavorable effect. In this review, we have summarized observational and intervention studies, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews that have evaluated the effects of the MedDiet as a pattern towards blood pressure (BP). However, the number of such studies is small. In general terms, the MedDiet has a favorable effect in reducing BP in hypertensive or healthy people but we do not have enough data to declare how strong this effect is. Many more studies are required to fully understand the BP changes induced by the MedDiet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients Intake and Hypertension)
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