Special Issue "Nutraceutical Approaches to Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases: Evidence and Opportunities"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Paolo Magni
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
2. IRCCS Multimedica Hospital, 20099 Milan, Italy
Interests: cardiovascular disease; metabolic diseases; atherosclerosis; nutraceutics; nutrition; biomarkers; endocrinology
Dr. Andrea Baragetti
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: internal medicine; cardiovascular pharmacology; cardiovascular genomic; translational immunometabolism
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Andrea Poli
Website
Guest Editor
Nutrition Foundation of Italy, 20124 Milan, Italy
Interests: human nutrition; cardiovascular and metabolic nutraceutics; cardiovascular risk
Prof. Dr. Alberico L. Catapano
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
2. IRCCS Multimedica Hospital, 20099 Milan, Italy
Interests: atherosclerosis; dyslipidemias; cardiovascular disease; immunity; genetics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cardiovascular and metabolic diseases are still the major cause of mortality, morbidity and disability worldwide. Their prevention and treatment should take advantage of lifestyle changes and, when appropriate, of pharmacological approaches. These may be integrated by the nutraceutical option, which, according to an increasing number of research papers, appears to be an additional and effective asset in this biomedical field. However, several issues still remain open regarding the efficacy and the safety of nutraceutical products for managing cardiometabolic diseases. Among them, the quality of evidence required to inform guidelines, the quality of nutraceutical products and the related regulatory aspects, and the actual role of probiotics in this area.

These and other critical issues, along with the most robust evidence from clinical trials, will be addressed in this Special Issue of Nutrients, which aims to implement a qualified and open evidence-based discussion on the use of nutraceutical products for cardiometabolic health, thus providing an up-to-date set of information useful for basic, translational and clinical readers. 

Prof. Dr. Paolo Magni
Dr. Andrea Baragetti
Dr. Andrea Poli
Prof. Dr. Alberico L. Catapano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutraceutics
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • metabolic diseases
  • dyslipidemia
  • vascular health
  • chronic inflammation
  • integrative medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Interactions of Oxysterols with Atherosclerosis Biomarkers in Subjects with Moderate Hypercholesterolemia and Effects of a Nutraceutical Combination (Bifidobacterium longum BB536, Red Yeast Rice Extract) (Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study)
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 427; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020427 - 28 Jan 2021
Viewed by 420
Abstract
Background: Oxysterol relationship with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors is poorly explored, especially in moderately hypercholesterolaemic subjects. Moreover, the impact of nutraceuticals controlling hypercholesterolaemia on plasma levels of 24-, 25- and 27-hydroxycholesterol (24-OHC, 25-OHC, 27-OHC) is unknown. Methods: Subjects (n = 33; 18–70 [...] Read more.
Background: Oxysterol relationship with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors is poorly explored, especially in moderately hypercholesterolaemic subjects. Moreover, the impact of nutraceuticals controlling hypercholesterolaemia on plasma levels of 24-, 25- and 27-hydroxycholesterol (24-OHC, 25-OHC, 27-OHC) is unknown. Methods: Subjects (n = 33; 18–70 years) with moderate hypercholesterolaemia (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C:): 130–200 mg/dL), in primary CV prevention as well as low CV risk were studied cross-sectionally. Moreover, they were evaluated after treatment with a nutraceutical combination (Bifidobacterium longum BB536, red yeast rice extract (10 mg/dose monacolin K)), following a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design. We evaluated 24-OHC, 25-OHC and 27-OHC levels by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Results: 24-OHC and 25-OHC were significantly correlated, 24-OHC was correlated with apoB. 27-OHC and 27-OHC/total cholesterol (TC) were higher in men (median 209 ng/mL and 77 ng/mg, respectively) vs. women (median 168 ng/mL and 56 ng/mg, respectively); 27-OHC/TC was significantly correlated with abdominal circumference, visceral fat and, negatively, with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Triglycerides were significantly correlated with 24-OHC, 25-OHC and 27-OHC and with 24-OHC/TC and 25-OHC/TC. After intervention, 27-OHC levels were significantly reduced by 10.4% in the nutraceutical group Levels of 24-OHC, 24-OHC/TC, 25-OHC, 25-OHC/TC and 27-OHC/TC were unchanged. Conclusions: In this study, conducted in moderate hypercholesterolemic subjects, we observed novel relationships between 24-OHC, 25-OHC and 27-OHC and CV risk biomarkers. In addition, no adverse changes of OHC levels upon nutraceutical treatment were found. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Gut Microbiota Functional Dysbiosis Relates to Individual Diet in Subclinical Carotid Atherosclerosis
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020304 - 21 Jan 2021
Viewed by 486
Abstract
Gut Microbiota (GM) dysbiosis associates with Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases (ACVD), but whether this also holds true in subjects without clinically manifest ACVD represents a challenge of personalized prevention. We connected exposure to diet (self-reported by food diaries) and markers of Subclinical Carotid Atherosclerosis [...] Read more.
Gut Microbiota (GM) dysbiosis associates with Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases (ACVD), but whether this also holds true in subjects without clinically manifest ACVD represents a challenge of personalized prevention. We connected exposure to diet (self-reported by food diaries) and markers of Subclinical Carotid Atherosclerosis (SCA) with individual taxonomic and functional GM profiles (from fecal metagenomic DNA) of 345 subjects without previous clinically manifest ACVD. Subjects without SCA reported consuming higher amounts of cereals, starchy vegetables, milky products, yoghurts and bakery products versus those with SCA (who reported to consume more mechanically separated meats). The variety of dietary sources significantly overlapped with the separations in GM composition between subjects without SCA and those with SCA (RV coefficient between nutrients quantities and microbial relative abundances at genus level = 0.65, p-value = 0.047). Additionally, specific bacterial species (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in the absence of SCA and Escherichia coli in the presence of SCA) are directly related to over-representation of metagenomic pathways linked to different dietary sources (sulfur oxidation and starch degradation in absence of SCA, and metabolism of amino acids, syntheses of palmitate, choline, carnitines and Trimethylamine n-oxide in presence of SCA). These findings might contribute to hypothesize future strategies of personalized dietary intervention for primary CVD prevention setting. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop