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Special Issue "Iron Intake and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Gladys Oluyemisi Latunde-Dada

Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: iron; nutrition; metabolism; absorption

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Iron is an essential micronutrient that is important for cellular and physiological processes, such as respiration, energy metabolism, replication, and gene regulation. Dietary iron is absorbed principally from the proximal duodenum in a regulated process that modulates iron homeostasis since iron excretion is not regulated in humans. Iron in foods is present in two forms, heme (meat types) and non-heme (vegetables and cereals). Recent publications have revealed iron bioavailability data on novel food products, new oral iron supplements or iron biofortifed foods that are safe and less toxic to the gut. Moreover, food processing procedures such as micro-milling or food encapsulation are employed to influence luminal bioaccessibilty and iron absorption from foods. Furthermore, gut microflora have emerged as important entities that modify food matrices, metabolites and modulate iron absorption in distal gut region. While the mechanism of heme iron absorption is still not resolved, intake and absorption of non-heme iron involve a regulated interplay of an apical ferrireduction, ferrous ion absorption by DMT1 symporter, abluminal efflux by ferroportin and ferroxidation by haphaestin. This intestinal transit machinery is regulated by transcriptional Hif-2α activation, post-transcriptional IRP-IRE binding and the post-translational inhibitory mechanism by hepcidin. Emerging evidence in recent years is, however, alluding to the modulation of the transport machinery by luminal bioactive ingredients or dietary constituents. Moreover, disorders of the gastrointestinal tract are common in chronic diseases with increased inflammation and hepcidin levels that result in a reduced iron intake and subsequently systemic iron deficiency. In contrast, genetic diseases such as mutation in genes that regulate hepcidin and ferroportin expression lead to inappropriately low hepcidin levels that promote iron absorption and result in iron overload.

Dr. Gladys Oluyemisi Latunde-Dada
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Iron
  • Intake
  • Processing
  • Bioavailability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Total and Nonheme Dietary Iron Intake Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components in Chinese Men and Women
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1663; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111663
Received: 13 October 2018 / Revised: 29 October 2018 / Accepted: 31 October 2018 / Published: 4 November 2018
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Abstract
The causal relationship between serum ferritin and metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains inconclusive. Dietary iron intake increases serum ferritin. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations of total, heme, and nonheme dietary iron intake with MetS and its components in men and
[...] Read more.
The causal relationship between serum ferritin and metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains inconclusive. Dietary iron intake increases serum ferritin. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations of total, heme, and nonheme dietary iron intake with MetS and its components in men and women in metropolitan China. Data from 3099 participants in the Shanghai Diet and Health Survey (SDHS) obtained during 2012–2013 were included in this analysis. Dietary intake was assessed by 24-h diet records from 3 consecutive days. Multivariate generalized linear mixed models were used to evaluate the associations of dietary iron intake with MetS and its components. After adjustment for potential confounders as age, sex, income, physical exercise, smoking status, alcohol use, and energy intake, a positive trend was observed across quartiles of total iron intake and risk of MetS (p for trend = 0.022). Compared with the lowest quartile of total iron intake (<12.72 mg/day), the highest quartile (≥21.88 mg/day) had an odds ratio (95% confidence interval), OR (95% CI), of 1.59 (1.15,2.20). In addition, the highest quartile of nonheme iron intake (≥20.10 mg/day) had a 1.44-fold higher risk of MetS compared with the lowest quartile (<11.62 mg/day), and higher risks of MetS components were associated with the third quartiles of total and nonheme iron intake. There was no association between heme iron intake and risk of MetS (p for trend = 0.895). Associations for total and nonheme iron intake with MetS risk were found in men but not in women. Total and nonheme dietary iron intake was found to be positively associated with MetS and its components in the adult population in metropolitan China. This research also revealed a gender difference in the association between dietary iron intake and MetS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron Intake and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle Iron (II) Citrate Complex as a Food Supplement: Synthesis, Characterization and Complex Stability
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1647; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111647
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 27 October 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 3 November 2018
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Abstract
Iron deficiency represents a widespread problem for a large part of the population, especially for women, and has received increasing attention in food/supplement research. The contraindications of the iron supplements commercially available (e.g., imbalances in the levels of other essential nutrients, low bioavailability,
[...] Read more.
Iron deficiency represents a widespread problem for a large part of the population, especially for women, and has received increasing attention in food/supplement research. The contraindications of the iron supplements commercially available (e.g., imbalances in the levels of other essential nutrients, low bioavailability, etc.) led us to search for a possible alternative. In the present work, a rapid and easy method to synthetize a solid iron (II) citrate complex from iron filings and citric acid was developed to serve, eventually, as a food supplement or additive. In order to state its atomic composition and purity, an assortment of analytical techniques was employed (e.g., combustion analysis, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffractometry, UV/Vis spectrophotometry, etc.). Results demonstrate that the synthesized crystalline solid corresponds to the formula FeC6H6O7∙H2O and, by consequence, contains exclusively iron (II), which is an advantage with respect to existing commercial products, because iron (II) is better absorbed than iron (III) (high bioavailability of iron). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron Intake and Human Health)
Figures

Graphical abstract

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