E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Environmental Influences on Dietary Intake of Children and Adolescents"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jessica S. Gubbels

Maastricht University, Department Health Promotion, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: childhood overweight; nutrition; physical activity; environmental influences

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Childhood is a crucial period for establishing lifelong healthy nutritional habits. The environment has an important influence on children’s dietary intake. Within the socio-cultural environment, parents, grandparents, peers, siblings, teachers, and others are important, for instance, by modelling behavior, implementing rules, or expressing certain norms. In addition to such interpersonal influences, higher-level influences are also important. These include the influence that social media and marketing of unhealthy foods have on today’s youngsters. Within the physical environment, the availability of healthy and unhealthy foods at home, school, and food outlets in the neighbourhood, among others, are essential. At the same time, the costs of healthy and unhealthy foods are of undeniable importance. Policies regarding these factors can set environmental changes into motion and ensure their long-term maintenance.

The current Special Issue focuses on the influence of environmental factors (socio-cultural, physical, political, and/or economic) on the dietary intake of children and adolescents (0–18 years of age) within any setting (e.g., home, child-care, school, neighbourhood) or environmental level. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, those described above. All types of quantitative (both observational and intervention studies) and qualitative studies are welcomed.

Dr. Jessica S. Gubbels
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Children and adolescents
  • Dietary intake
  • Nutritional habits
  • Environmental influences
  • Social influences
  • Availability, accessibility, and costs of food
  • Nutrition-related policy

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Modern Transference of Domestic Cooking Skills
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 870; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040870
Received: 13 March 2019 / Revised: 7 April 2019 / Accepted: 15 April 2019 / Published: 18 April 2019
PDF Full-text (236 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As the primary source of learning cooking skills; it is vital to understand what mothers think about the transference of cooking skills to their children. The current analysis aimed to highlight mothers’ perceptions of children’s involvement and cooking practices within the home setting. [...] Read more.
As the primary source of learning cooking skills; it is vital to understand what mothers think about the transference of cooking skills to their children. The current analysis aimed to highlight mothers’ perceptions of children’s involvement and cooking practices within the home setting. Sixteen focus group discussions were conducted on the island of Ireland (Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland [UK]) with 141 mothers aged 20–39 years old. All focus groups were transcribed verbatim and an inductive thematic analysis using NVivo software was undertaken. Seven themes emerged from the dataset; (1) “How we learned to cook”; (2) “Who’s the boss”; (3) “Children in the way”; (4) “Keep kids out”; (5) “Involvement means eating”; (6) “Intentions versus reality”; and (7) “Kids’ ‘interest’ in cooking”. These themes illustrate a lack of cooking skill transference in relation to everyday meal preparation in modern times. The culture of children in the kitchen has vastly changed; and opportunities for children to learn basic skills are currently limited. Further research is required to confirm the findings that emerged from this analysis. Full article
Open AccessArticle
We Don’t Have a Lot of Healthy Options: Food Environment Perceptions of First-Year, Minority College Students Attending a Food Desert Campus
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 816; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040816
Received: 19 February 2019 / Revised: 2 April 2019 / Accepted: 8 April 2019 / Published: 11 April 2019
PDF Full-text (918 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
First-year college students are at particular risk of dietary maladaptation during their transition to adulthood. A college environment that facilitates consistent access to nutritious food is critical to ensuring dietary adequacy among students. The objective of the study was to examine perceptions of [...] Read more.
First-year college students are at particular risk of dietary maladaptation during their transition to adulthood. A college environment that facilitates consistent access to nutritious food is critical to ensuring dietary adequacy among students. The objective of the study was to examine perceptions of the campus food environment and its influence on the eating choices of first-year students attending a minority-serving university located in a food desert. Focus group interviews with twenty-one first-year students were conducted from November 2016 to January 2017. Students participated in 1 of 5 focus groups. Most interviewees identified as being of Hispanic/Latino or Asian/Pacific Islander origin. A grounded theory approach was applied for inductive identification of relevant concepts and deductive interpretation of patterns and relationships among themes. Themes related to the perceived food environment included adequacy (i.e., variety and quality), acceptability (i.e., familiarity and preferences), affordability, and accessibility (i.e., convenience and accommodation). Subjective norms and processes of decisional balance and agency were themes characterizing interpersonal and personal factors affecting students’ eating choices. The perceived environment appeared to closely interact with subjective norms to inform internal processes of decision-making and agency around the eating choices of first-year students attending a minority-serving university campus located in a food desert. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Reform of School Catering in Hungary: Anatomy of a Health-Education Attempt
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 716; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040716
Received: 14 January 2019 / Revised: 21 March 2019 / Accepted: 25 March 2019 / Published: 27 March 2019
PDF Full-text (1616 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
School lunch nutrition standards are an important carrier of messages on healthy eating and an efficient way of changing the nutritional behaviour of new generations. Many countries in Europe have a compulsory system of school meals; the Hungarian government also wanted to take [...] Read more.
School lunch nutrition standards are an important carrier of messages on healthy eating and an efficient way of changing the nutritional behaviour of new generations. Many countries in Europe have a compulsory system of school meals; the Hungarian government also wanted to take action in order to improve the nutrition requirements of the school catering service. The Hungarian Ministry of Human Resources established some limits in the school catering system. However, increasing public pressure forced the legislating organ to considerably modify this regulation. The aim of this study is to analyse the causes of this failure, based on a conceptual framework of institutional economics and a strategic modelling of different institutes by examining the results of 72 interviews (33 experts, 26 parents and 13 teachers) conducted with representatives of different stakeholders. The results highlight the lack of preparation for the introduction of the new regulatory framework, as well as the inefficient communication between the different stakeholders. In order to support children in eating healthfully, a complex nutrition education program and continuous dialogue is needed between teachers, parents, catering staff and the government. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top