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Open AccessArticle

Can Parenting Practices Moderate the Relationship between Reward Sensitivity and Adolescents’ Consumption of Snacks and Sugar-Sweetened Beverages?

1
Department of Marketing, Innovation and Organisation, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
2
Department of Nutrition and Public Health, University of Agder, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway
3
Department of Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
4
Department of Business studies and Business Administration, Karel De Grote University College, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010178 (registering DOI)
Received: 5 November 2019 / Revised: 16 December 2019 / Accepted: 18 December 2019 / Published: 8 January 2020
Background: Reward sensitivity has been associated with adolescents’ intake of unhealthy snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages. However, so far, there are no studies published describing the impact of parenting practices on this relationship. The present study will, therefore, investigate whether food parenting practices can moderate the association between reward sensitivity and diet intakes. Method: A cross-sectional research study was conducted among 14- to 16-year old Flemish adolescents (n = 867, age 14.7 ± 0.8 y, 48.1% boys) and a subset of their parents (n = 131), collecting data on daily intakes, reward sensitivity, and food parenting practices. Linear regression was used to assess the moderation effect of parenting practices (both adolescent- and parent-reported) on the relationship between reward sensitivity, and diet using SPSS 25.0. Results: In the main analysis (adolescent-reported), no significant moderation effects were found for parenting practices on the relationship between reward sensitivity and diet. However, the sensitivity analysis (parent-reported) showed a moderation effect for health-reducing parenting practices on the association between reward sensitivity and unhealthy snack intake (β = 0.297, 95% CI = 0.062, 0.531, p = 0.01). Conclusion: Given the difference in the effect of parenting practices between the adolescent- and parent-reported data, our inconclusive findings warrant more research in larger adolescent-parent dyad samples. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescent; reward sensitivity; parents; nutrition; environment; snacks; sugar-sweetened beverages adolescent; reward sensitivity; parents; nutrition; environment; snacks; sugar-sweetened beverages
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Van Lippevelde, W.; Vervoort, L.; Vangeel, J.; Goossens, L. Can Parenting Practices Moderate the Relationship between Reward Sensitivity and Adolescents’ Consumption of Snacks and Sugar-Sweetened Beverages? Nutrients 2020, 12, 178.

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