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Open AccessArticle

Unravelling the Effects of the Healthy Primary School of the Future: For Whom and Where Is It Effective?

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Department of Health Promotion, Care and Public Health Research Institute (CAPHRI), Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Department of Health Promotion, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM), Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Academic Collaborative Centre for Public Health Limburg, Public Health Services, P.O. Box 33, 6400 AA Heerlen, The Netherlands
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Department of Nutritional and Movement Sciences, Nutrition and Translational Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Department of Health Services Research, Care and Public Health Research Institute (CAPHRI), Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2119; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092119
Received: 13 June 2019 / Revised: 23 August 2019 / Accepted: 4 September 2019 / Published: 5 September 2019
The ‘Healthy Primary School of the Future’ (HPSF) aims to integrate health and well-being within the whole school system. This study examined the two-year effects of HPSF on children’s dietary and physical activity (PA) behaviours at school and at home and investigated whether child characteristics or the home context moderated these effects. This study (n = 1676 children) has a quasi-experimental design with four intervention schools, i.e., two full HPSF (focus: nutrition and PA), two partial HPSF (focus: PA), and four control schools. Measurements consisted of accelerometry (Actigraph GT3X+) and questionnaires. Favourable effects on children’s dietary and PA behaviours at school were found in the full HPSF; in the partial HPSF, only on PA behaviours. Children in the full HPSF did not compensate at home for the improved health behaviours at school, while in the partial HPSF, the children became less active at home. In both the full and partial HPSF, less favourable effects at school were found for younger children. At home, less favourable effects were found for children with a lower socioeconomic status. Overall, the effect of the full HPSF on children’s dietary and PA behaviours was larger and more equally beneficial for all children than that of the partial HPSF. View Full-Text
Keywords: intervention effects; microsystems; nutrition; parenting practices; physical activity; school health promotion intervention effects; microsystems; nutrition; parenting practices; physical activity; school health promotion
MDPI and ACS Style

Bartelink, N.; van Assema, P.; Kremers, S.; Savelberg, H.; Gevers, D.; Jansen, M. Unravelling the Effects of the Healthy Primary School of the Future: For Whom and Where Is It Effective? Nutrients 2019, 11, 2119.

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