Special Issue "Dietary Intake and Physical Activity for Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Yosuke Yamada
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, Japan
Interests: energy metabolism; calorie restriction; physical activity; body composition; sarcopenia; dietary intake

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The World Health Organization (WHO) stated that unhealthy diet and physical inactivity are leading global risks to human health. Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), such as cardiovascular diseases (e.g., heart attacks and stroke), cancers, chronic respiratory diseases (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma), and diabetes, kill 41 million people each year, equivalent to 71% of all deaths in the world. A number of epidemiological studies has been published that examine the relationship between dietary intake or diet quality and health and the relationship between exercise habits, physical activity, or inactivity and health outcomes. However, the double burden of malnutrition which refers to the dual burden of under- and overnutrition occurring simultaneously within a population becomes a big issue globally.

The double burden of malnutrition is related to the lifestyle, socioeconomic status, and access to healthy food or an exercise environment. The healthy habits associated with diet intake and physical activity may differ depending on age (infant, children, adolescent, or middle- or older-age), sex, genetic background, cultural background, medical biography, and current medical status. Thus, high-quality or well-designed epidemiological studies (meta-analysis, intervention, longitudinal, or cross-sectional studies) are still needed. On this topic, you are invited to submit manuscripts that fit the objectives and the topics of this Special Issue.

The objective of this proposed Special Issue on “Diet Intake and Physical Activity for Human Health” is to publish selected papers detailing the role of diet and/or physical activity for human health in general. In particular, papers which examine the interaction between diet intake and physical activity on human health are welcome. To maintain a healthy weight, energy intake should be in balance with total daily energy expenditure (TDEE). TDEE comprises resting energy expenditure, diet-induced thermogenesis, plus physical activity energy expenditure. Review or clinical/experimental studies about such an energy metabolism are welcome to this Special Issue, as well as papers related to the metabolism of any major or minor nutrients.

The studies that aim to establish a diet recommendation on people who have limited daily physical activities because of diseases, disability, or frailty or people who engage in high-intensity or -volume physical activities due to their sports activities, occupation, or cultural environment are also suitable for this Special Issue. In addition, innovation and technological advancements on assessing dietary intake and physical activity are important to understand the effect of dietary intake and physical activity for human health. Hence, studies focused on developing or validating such assessments are also welcome. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Interaction between diet intake and physical activity on human health;
  • Healthy habits of diet intake and physical activity in specific age groups, sex, genetic background, cultural background, medical biography, and current medical status;
  • Adequate diet intake of people who have limited physical activity due to diseases, disability, or frailty;
  • Dietary recommendations for people who engage in high-intensity or -volume physical activities due to their sports activities, occupation, or cultural environment.

Dr. Yosuke Yamada
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Energy metabolism
  • Protein
  • Fat
  • Carbohydrate
  • Water intake
  • Vitamins
  • Minerals
  • Noncommunicable diseases
  • Athletes
  • Body composition
  • Physical activity
  • Exercise

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Capsinoids on Daily Physical Activity, Body Composition and Cold Hypersensitivity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Randomized Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010212 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Sedentary/inactive lifestyle leads middle-aged and older adults to metabolic syndrome and frailty. Capsinoids from nonpungent chili pepper cultivar have been reported to reduce body fat mass, promote metabolism, and improve unidentified complaints of chills. Additionally, they have an anti-inflammation effect; therefore, we hypothesized [...] Read more.
Sedentary/inactive lifestyle leads middle-aged and older adults to metabolic syndrome and frailty. Capsinoids from nonpungent chili pepper cultivar have been reported to reduce body fat mass, promote metabolism, and improve unidentified complaints of chills. Additionally, they have an anti-inflammation effect; therefore, we hypothesized that continuous oral ingestion of capsinoids alleviates age-related inflammation in the brain and improves the physical activity (PA) in middle-aged and older adults. In our double-blind human study, 69 participants (17 male, 52 female; mean age: 74.1 ± 7.7 years; range: 52–87 years) were administered either 9 mg of capsinoids which were extracted from pepper fruit variety CH-19 Sweet (Capsicum anuum L.) (CP group), or a placebo (PL group) daily over a 3 month period. In an animal study, PA and inflammation-related mRNA expression in the brain were examined in 5-week (young) and 53-week (old) aged mice fed a diet with or without 0.3% dihydrocapsiate, a type of capsinoids, for 12 weeks. In a human study, capsinoids intake did not increase the amount of light-to-moderate PA less than 6.0 metabolic equivalents (METs) (CP: 103.0 ± 28.2 at baseline to 108.2 ± 28.3 at 12 weeks; PL: 104.6 ± 19.8 at baseline to 115.2 ± 23.6 at 12 weeks, METs × hour/week); however, in participants exhibiting an inactive lifestyle, it showed significant increase (CP: 84.5 ± 17.2 at baseline to 99.2 ± 24.9 at 12 weeks; PL: 99.7 ± 23.3 at baseline to 103.8 ± 21.9 at 12 weeks). The energy expenditure in physical activity also improved in the inactive CP group (CP: 481.2 ± 96.3 at baseline to 562.5 ± 145.5 at 12 weeks; PL: 536.8 ± 112.2 at baseline to 598.6 ± 127.6 at 12 weeks; kcal/day). In all participants, CP showed reduced waist circumference, percent body fat, and visceral fat volume; in addition, chills were eased in subjects aged 80 years and older. The older mice fed capsinoids showed increased locomotion activity, decreased inflammation, and oxidative stress in the brain. The results suggest that the continuous oral ingestion of capsinoids gains PA through anti-inflammation effect in the brain as well as reduces fat accumulation and chills in inactive and older humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Physical Activity for Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Physical Activity and/or High Protein Intake Maintains Fat-Free Mass in Older People with Mild Disability; the Fukuoka Island City Study: A Cross-Sectional Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2595; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112595 - 29 Oct 2019
Abstract
Body composition changes with age, with fat mass (FM) increasing and fat-free mass (FFM) decreasing. Higher physical activity and high or adequate protein intake are thought to be beneficial in preventing the loss of skeletal muscle mass in the elderly. We aimed to [...] Read more.
Body composition changes with age, with fat mass (FM) increasing and fat-free mass (FFM) decreasing. Higher physical activity and high or adequate protein intake are thought to be beneficial in preventing the loss of skeletal muscle mass in the elderly. We aimed to investigate the relationships between physical activity, protein intake, and FFM in older people with mild disability. Total energy expenditure (TEE) under free-living conditions was assessed using the doubly-labelled water (DLW) method, and physical activity was measured using a triaxial accelerometer. Dietary intake was assessed using a self-recorded food intake diary during the DLW period. Percent FFM was significantly positively correlated with protein intake and physical activity level (PAL) after adjustment for age and sex (protein intake r = 0.652, p < 0.001, PAL r = 0.345, p = 0.011). In multiple linear regression analysis, when PAL, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), or protein intake were included, 31%, 32%, and 55%, respectively, of the variation in %FFM was explained. Moreover, the addition of both PAL/MVPA and protein intake explained 61%/60%, respectively, of the variation in %FFM. Either protein intake above the currently recommended level or higher levels of physical activity would be beneficial for the maintenance of high %FFM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Physical Activity for Human Health)
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