Special Issue "New Perspectives for the Development of Li-Ion Batteries of the 21st Century"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francisco Márquez
Website
Guest Editor
Nanomaterials Research Group-NRG, School of Natural Sciences and Technology, Universidad Ana G. Méndez-Gurabo Campus, 00778PR, USA
Interests: catalysis, carbon nanotubes, hydrogen, photodegradation, Li-ion batteries
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Carmen Morant

Guest Editor
Laboratory of Coatings and Nanostructures, Department of Applied Physics Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain
Interests: Li-ion batteries, silicon nanowires, carbon nanotubes, membranes, nanotribology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lithium-ion batteries represent one of the most outstanding advances in energy storage systems of recent times. The combination of electrochemically active materials and conductive carbonaceous materials for the manufacture of nanocomposite electrodes provides lithium-ion batteries with high capacity, excellent cycling stability, power density, and lightweight. The potential applications are vast, but they are particularly focused on electronic materials, computers, mobile phones, and other portable systems. The technology involved in these systems, especially when high performance is needed, is still excessively expensive, which has meant a certain limitation for its widespread use. In recent years, there have been many advances related to stability, performance or durability, thanks, among other things, to the incorporation of new nanostructured materials. These include carbon nanotubes, nanowires, and two-dimensional materials such as graphene, graphitic compounds, or other layered materials, among others.

This Special Issue aims to provide significant contributions that impact on the advances in the synthesis, optimization, and characterization of nanostructured materials, with application to the development of both anodes and cathodes of high-performance lithium-ion batteries. The final goal is to have a global vision of the state-of-the-art related to the most advanced materials that could represent a significant improvement of the energy storage systems of the 21st century.

Prof. Dr. Francisco Márquez
Prof. Dr. Carmen Morant
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • carbon nanotubes, nanowires, and two-dimensional materials
  • synthesis, optimization, and characterization of nanostructured materials
  • application in high-performance lithium-ion batteries

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
0D-1D Hybrid Silicon Nanocomposite as Lithium-Ion Batteries Anodes
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 515; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030515 - 12 Mar 2020
Abstract
Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are the enabling technology for many of the societal changes that are expected to happen in the following years. Among all the challenges for which LIBs are the key, vehicle electrification is one of the most crucial. Current battery [...] Read more.
Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are the enabling technology for many of the societal changes that are expected to happen in the following years. Among all the challenges for which LIBs are the key, vehicle electrification is one of the most crucial. Current battery materials cannot provide the required power densities for such applications and therefore, it makes necessary to develop new materials. Silicon is one of the proposed as next generation battery materials, but still there are challenges to overcome. Poor capacity retention is one of those drawbacks, and because it is tightly related with its high capacity, it is a problem rather difficult to address with common and scalable fabrication processes. Here we show that combining 0D and 1D silicon nanostructures, high capacity and stability can be achieved even using standard electrode fabrication processes. Capacities as high as 1200 mAh/g for more than 500 cycles at high current densities (2 A/g) were achieved with the produced hybrid 0D/1D electrodes. In this research, it was shown that while 0D nanostructures provide good strain relaxation capabilities, 1D nanomaterials contribute with enhanced cohesion and conductive matrix integrity. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Sn4P3–Carbon Composite Films for Lithium-Ion Battery Anode Fabricated by Aerosol Deposition
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 1032; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9071032 - 19 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
We fabricated tin phosphide–carbon (Sn4P3/C) composite film by aerosol deposition (AD) and investigated its electrochemical performance for a lithium-ion battery anode. Sn4P3/C composite powders prepared by a ball milling was used as raw material and [...] Read more.
We fabricated tin phosphide–carbon (Sn4P3/C) composite film by aerosol deposition (AD) and investigated its electrochemical performance for a lithium-ion battery anode. Sn4P3/C composite powders prepared by a ball milling was used as raw material and deposited onto a stainless steel substrate to form the composite film via impact consolidation. The Sn4P3/C composite film fabricated by AD showed much better electrochemical performance than the Sn4P3 film without complexing carbon. Although both films showed initial discharge (Li+ extraction) capacities of approximately 1000 mAh g−1, Sn4P3/C films retained higher reversible capacity above 700 mAh g−1 after 100 cycles of charge and discharge processes while the capacity of Sn4P3 film rapidly degraded with cycling. In addition, by controlling the potential window in galvanostatic testing, Sn4P3/C composite film retained the reversible capacity of 380 mAh g−1 even after 400 cycles. The complexed carbon works not only as a buffer to suppress the collapse of electrodes by large volume change of Sn4P3 in charge and discharge reactions but also as an electronic conduction path among the atomized active material particles in the film. Full article
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