Special Issue "Nano-Fabrication Technology and Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 12 April 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yung-Chun Lee
Website
Guest Editor
National Cheng Kung University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tainan, Taiwan
Interests: nano-imprinting lithography; contact printing lithography; fabrication of seamless roller mold; maskless lithography; grayscaled lithography for 3D microfabrication; excumer laser micromachining of 3D structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The capabilities of fabricating nanostructures on a variety of materials play a key role in the development and applications of nanoscience and nanotechnologies. Research in nanofabrication has been significantly influenced by the advancement of photolithography in the semiconductor industry for mass production of integrated circuits (ICs) and electronic devices. In the meantime, other types of nanofabrication technologies have also been emerging continuously in recent decades, with different characteristics, emphasis, purposes, and applications. The approach can be either top–down, such as e-beam lithography, focus ion beam, nanoimprinting, laser interference lithography, etc., or bottom–up, for example, molecular self-assembly, sol-gel process, vapor deposition. The issues involved in developing new nanofabrication methods include the underlying physical/chemical principles being used, the tools and materials to facilitate the fabrication process, the capabilities and limitations in nanofabrication, as well as their reliability, stability, and applicability. This Special Issue invites manuscripts concerning innovative nanofabrication technologies with an emphasis on a broad range of applications.

Prof. Dr. Yung-Chun Lee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanofabrication techniques
  • Nanolithography
  • Nanopatterning
  • Nanostructures
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanostructured device
  • Bottom–up nanofabrication
  • Top–down nanofabrication
  • Two/three-dimensional (2/3D) nanofabrication

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Impact of Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching Conditions on the Formation of Semi-Polar (\({11\overline{2}2}\)) and Non-Polar (\({11\overline{2}0}\)) GaN Nanorods
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2562; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122562 - 20 Dec 2020
Abstract
The formation of gallium nitride (GaN) semi-polar and non-polar nanostructures is of importance for improving light extraction/absorption of optoelectronic devices, creating optical resonant cavities or reducing the defect density. However, very limited studies of nanotexturing via dry etching have been performed, in comparison [...] Read more.
The formation of gallium nitride (GaN) semi-polar and non-polar nanostructures is of importance for improving light extraction/absorption of optoelectronic devices, creating optical resonant cavities or reducing the defect density. However, very limited studies of nanotexturing via dry etching have been performed, in comparison to wet etching. In this paper, we investigate the formation and morphology of semi-polar (112¯2) and non-polar (112¯0) GaN nanorods using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching. The impact of gas chemistry, pressure, temperature, radio-frequency (RF) and ICP power and time are explored. A dominant chemical component is found to have a significant impact on the morphology, being impacted by the polarity of the planes. In contrast, increasing the physical component enables the impact of crystal orientation to be minimized to achieve a circular nanorod profile with inclined sidewalls. These conditions were obtained for a small percentage of chlorine (Cl2) within the Cl2 + argon (Ar) plasma combined with a low pressure. Damage to the crystal was reduced by lowering the direct current (DC) bias through a reduction of the RF power and an increase of the ICP power. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Fabrication Technology and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Deriving Optimized PID Parameters of Nano-Ag Colloid Prepared by Electrical Spark Discharge Method
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1091; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061091 - 01 Jun 2020
Abstract
Using the electrical spark discharge method, this study prepared a nano-Ag colloid using self-developed, microelectrical discharge machining equipment. Requiring no additional surfactant, the approach in question can be used at the ambient temperature and pressure. Moreover, this novel physical method of preparation produced [...] Read more.
Using the electrical spark discharge method, this study prepared a nano-Ag colloid using self-developed, microelectrical discharge machining equipment. Requiring no additional surfactant, the approach in question can be used at the ambient temperature and pressure. Moreover, this novel physical method of preparation produced no chemical pollution. This study conducted an in-depth investigation to establish the following electrical discharge conditions: gap electrical discharge, short circuits, and open circuits. Short circuits affect system lifespan and cause electrode consumption, resulting in large, non-nanoscale particles. Accordingly, in this study, research for and design of a new logic judgment circuit set was used to determine the short-circuit rate. The Ziegler–Nichols proportional–integral–derivative (PID) method was then adopted to find optimal PID values for reducing the ratio between short-circuit and discharge rates of the system. The particle size, zeta potential, and ultraviolet spectrum of the nano-Ag colloid prepared using the aforementioned method were also analyzed with nanoanalysis equipment. Lastly, the characteristics of nanosized particles were analyzed with a transmission electron microscope. This study found that the lowest ratio between short-circuit rates was obtained (1.77%) when PID parameters were such that Kp was 0.96, Ki was 5.760576, and Kd was 0.039996. For the nano-Ag colloid prepared using the aforementioned PID parameters, the particle size was 3.409 nm, zeta potential was approximately −46.8 mV, absorbance was approximately 0.26, and surface plasmon resonance was 390 nm. Therefore, this study demonstrated that reducing the short-circuit rate can substantially enhance the effectiveness of the preparation and produce an optimal nano-Ag colloid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Fabrication Technology and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Co-Solvent Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride: Effect of Raw Bulk Boron Nitride Size and Co-Solvent Composition
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1035; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061035 - 28 May 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Exfoliation of two-dimensional boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) from parent bulk material has been receiving intensive attention because of its fascinating physical properties. Liquid exfoliation is a simple, scalable approach to produce single-layer or few-layer BNNS. In this paper, water/propanol co-solvent exfoliation of bulk [...] Read more.
Exfoliation of two-dimensional boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) from parent bulk material has been receiving intensive attention because of its fascinating physical properties. Liquid exfoliation is a simple, scalable approach to produce single-layer or few-layer BNNS. In this paper, water/propanol co-solvent exfoliation of bulk boron nitride under the assistance of sonication was investigated in detail. Special attention was paid on the effect of raw bulk boron nitride size and co-solvent composition. The results show that sonication of small-size hexagonal boron nitride tends to generate large nanosheets, due to a predominant solvent wedge effect. In addition, it is found that the composition of water/propanol co-solvent has an important effect on exfoliation efficiency. Interestingly, although two isomers of 1-propanol (NPA) and 2-propanol (IPA) have the same molecular weight and similar surface tension, their aqueous solutions allow the formation of boron nitride nanosheets dispersion with markedly different concentrations. It is proposed that due to their spatial configuration difference, NPA with its longer molecular chain and fewer hydrophobic methyl group tends to form dynamic water-NPA clusters with larger size than water-IPA clusters. The hydrodynamic radius of the co-solvent “clusters” was calculated to be 0.72 nm for water/NPA system and 0.44 nm for water/IPA system at their maximum, respectively. Their size changes, represented by two curves, indicate a strong “cluster size” effect on exfoliation efficiency. Our work provides an insight into co-solvent exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride and emphasizes the importance of co-solvent cluster size in exfoliation efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Fabrication Technology and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Platinum and Iridium Oxide Co-modified TiO2 Nanotubes Array Based Photoelectrochemical Sensors for Glutathione
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 522; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030522 - 13 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Oriented TiO2 nanotubes, which are fabricated by anodic oxidation method, are prospective in photoelectrochemical analysis and sensors. In this work, Pt and IrO2 co-modified TiO2 nanotubes array was prepared via a two-step deposition process involving the photoreductive deposition of Pt [...] Read more.
Oriented TiO2 nanotubes, which are fabricated by anodic oxidation method, are prospective in photoelectrochemical analysis and sensors. In this work, Pt and IrO2 co-modified TiO2 nanotubes array was prepared via a two-step deposition process involving the photoreductive deposition of Pt and chemical deposition of IrO2 on the oriented TiO2 nanotubes. Due to the improved separation of photo-generated electrons and holes, Pt-IrO2 co-modified TiO2 nanotubes presented significantly higher PEC activity than pure TiO2 nanotubes or mono-modified TiO2 nanotubes. The PEC sensitivity of Pt-IrO2 co-modified TiO2 nanotubes for glutathione was also monitored and good sensitivity was observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Fabrication Technology and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Low-Power Flexible Organic Field-Effect Transistors with Solution-Processable Polymer-Ceramic Nanoparticle Composite Dielectrics
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 518; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030518 - 12 Mar 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
Polymer-ceramic dielectric composites have been of great interest because they combine the processability of polymers with the desired dielectric properties of the ceramics. We fabricated a low voltage-operated flexible organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based on crosslinked poly (4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) polymer blended with [...] Read more.
Polymer-ceramic dielectric composites have been of great interest because they combine the processability of polymers with the desired dielectric properties of the ceramics. We fabricated a low voltage-operated flexible organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based on crosslinked poly (4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) polymer blended with novel ceramic calcium titanate nanoparticles (CaTiO3 NPs) as gate dielectric. To reduce interface roughness caused by nanoparticles, it was further coated with a very thin PVP film. The resulting OFET exhibited much lower operated voltage (reducing from –10.5 V to –2.9 V), a relatively steeper threshold slope (~0.8 V/dec) than those containing a pure PVP dielectric. This is ascribed to the high capacitance of the CaTiO3 NP-filled PVP insulator, and its smoother and hydrophobic dielectric surface proved by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a water contact angle test. We also evaluated the transistor properties in a compressed state. The corresponding device had no significant degradation in performance when bending at various diameters. In particular, it operated well continuously for 120 hours during a constant bending stress. We believe that this technology will be instrumental in the development of future flexible and printed electronic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Fabrication Technology and Applications)
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