Special Issue "Nanotubes for Health, Environment and Cultural Heritages"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Lazzara
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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica (DiFC), University of Palermo, Italy
Interests: supramolecular structures; nanocomposite; drug-delivery; conservation of cultural heritage; environmental friendly materials; halloysite; nanoclays; calorimetry and thermal analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Rawil F. Fakhrullin
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kreml uramı 18, Kazan 420008, Republic of Tatarstan, Russian Federation
Interests: drug delivery vehicles; tissue engineering; halloysite; whole-cell biosensors; electrochemical biosensors; quarz crystal microbalance; microscopy; cell surface engineering; nanotoxicology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotubular structures possess many interesting features that can be useful in different fields of application. They are present in recent literature, with a wide range of sizes at nanoscales and chemical in nature.

Composites based on nanotubular additives are well known to form materials with tuned properties and excellent mechanical responses. Moreover, the hollow morphology is strategic because it can be loaded with active substances (antimicrobials, anticorrosives, antiacids, drugs, genes, antioxidants) for a sustained release. These features can be employed in smart coatings, smart food packaging, drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, reinforced bioplastics, flame retardants, etc. A number of biosensors, built using various nanotubes, have been reported so far. Still, there is a demand for structure–property correlations for the design of nanoarchitectures with these smart features. This Special Issue is focused on the structural and morphological features, performances, and perspective applications of nanotubes. In particular organic (cyclic polypeptides, carbon nanotubes) and inorganic nanotubes (halloysite, imogolite, tungsten disulfide, titanium dioxide, zirconia dioxide, zinc oxide and boron nitrides nanotubes) are considered.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Lazzara
Prof. Dr. Rawil F. Fakhrullin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanotubes: structure and functions
  • Drug Delivery
  • Remediation
  • Tissue engineering
  • Nanotoxicology
  • Biosensors
  • Cultural Heritages

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Evolution of Hair Treatment and Care: Prospects of Nanotube-Based Formulations
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 903; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060903 - 21 Jun 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
A new approach for hair treatment through coating with nanotubes loaded with drugs or dyes for coloring is suggested. This coating is produced by nanotube self-assembly, resulting in stable 2–3 µm thick layers. For medical treatment such formulations allow for sustained long-lasting drug [...] Read more.
A new approach for hair treatment through coating with nanotubes loaded with drugs or dyes for coloring is suggested. This coating is produced by nanotube self-assembly, resulting in stable 2–3 µm thick layers. For medical treatment such formulations allow for sustained long-lasting drug delivery directly on the hair surface, also enhanced in the cuticle openings. For coloring, this process allows avoiding a direct hair contact with dye encased inside the clay nanotubes and provides a possibility to load water insoluble dyes from an organic solvent, store the formulation for a long time in dried form, and then apply to hair as an aqueous nanotube suspension. The described technique works with human and other mammal hairs and halloysite nanoclay coating is resilient against multiple shampoo washing. The most promising, halloysite tubule clay, is a biocompatible natural material which may be loaded with basic red, blue, and yellow dyes for optimized hair color, and also with drugs (e.g., antilice care-permethrin) to enhance the treatment efficiency with sustained release. This functionalized nanotube coating may have applications in human medical and beauty formulations, as well as veterinary applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotubes for Health, Environment and Cultural Heritages)
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Open AccessArticle
Directly Grown Multiwall Carbon Nanotube and Hydrothermal MnO2 Composite for High-Performance Supercapacitor Electrodes
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 703; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050703 - 06 May 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
MnO2–MWNT–Ni foam supercapacitor electrodes were developed based on directly grown multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and hydrothermal MnO2 nanostructures on Ni foam substrates. The electrodes demonstrated excellent electrochemical and battery properties. The charge transfer resistance dropped 88.8% compared with the electrode [...] Read more.
MnO2–MWNT–Ni foam supercapacitor electrodes were developed based on directly grown multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and hydrothermal MnO2 nanostructures on Ni foam substrates. The electrodes demonstrated excellent electrochemical and battery properties. The charge transfer resistance dropped 88.8% compared with the electrode without MWNTs. A high specific capacitance of 1350.42 F·g−1 was reached at the current density of 6.5 A·g−1. The electrode exhibited a superior rate capability with 92.5% retention in 25,000 cycles. Direct MWNT growth benefits the supercapacitor application for low charge transfer resistance and strong MWNT–current collector binding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotubes for Health, Environment and Cultural Heritages)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Antimicrobial Applications of Clay Nanotube-Based Composites
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 708; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050708 - 07 May 2019
Cited by 12
Abstract
Halloysite nanotubes with different outer surface/inner lumen chemistry (SiO2/Al2O3) are natural objects with a 50 nm diameter hollow cylindrical structure, which are able to carry functional compounds both inside and outside. They are promising for biological applications [...] Read more.
Halloysite nanotubes with different outer surface/inner lumen chemistry (SiO2/Al2O3) are natural objects with a 50 nm diameter hollow cylindrical structure, which are able to carry functional compounds both inside and outside. They are promising for biological applications where their drug loading capacity combined with a low toxicity ensures the safe interaction of these nanomaterials with living cells. In this paper, the antimicrobial properties of the clay nanotube-based composites are reviewed, including applications in microbe-resistant biocidal textile, paints, filters, and medical formulations (wound dressings, drug delivery systems, antiseptic sprays, and tissue engineering scaffolds). Though halloysite-based antimicrobial materials have been widely investigated, their application in medicine needs clinical studies. This review suggests the scalable antimicrobial nano/micro composites based on natural tubule clays and outlines research and development perspectives in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotubes for Health, Environment and Cultural Heritages)
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