Special Issue "Advanced Nanomaterials for Pollutant Gases Reduction and Abatement"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (6 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sónia Carabineiro
Website
Guest Editor
LAQV/REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1099-085 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: gold; catalysis; carbon; oxides; nanocatalysts; nanoparticles; oxidation; heterogenization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As we all know, air pollution is currently a huge problem. The air we breathe can contain amounts of harmful gases and particulates that can lead to health problems in humans and animals and also damage the environment. Some of these pollutants are caused by natural processes, but most are due to human activities. Both outdoor and indoor air quality are of great concern.

Major air pollutants include carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, volatile organic compounds, greenhouse gases, stratospheric ozone depleters, soot, among others.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials intends to highlight progress made so far on advanced nanomaterials for pollutants reduction and abatement. We welcome papers dealing with the following topics, but without being limited to these: catalytic and photochemical reduction of pollutants, electrochemical selective reduction of pollutant gases, also with materials and processes, as well as ideas for reduction of pollutant emissions in transportation and industry.

We hope to provide inspiration to scientists to continue facing these challenges and make further advances in this field.

Prof. Dr. Sónia Carabineiro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pollutants reduction and abatement
  • Catalytic reduction of pollutants
  • Photochemical reduction of pollutants
  • Electrochemical reduction of pollutants
  • Selective reduction of pollutants
  • Sustainable reduction of pollutants
  • Environmental reduction of pollutants
  • Mechanisms of reduction of pollutants
  • Pollutants reduction targets
  • Processes for pollutants reduction
  • Materials for pollutants reduction
  • Reduction of pollutants emissions in transportation and industry
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Carbon monoxide
  • Nitrogen oxides
  • Sulfur oxides
  • Volatile organic compounds
  • Greenhouse gases
  • Stratospheric ozone depleters
  • Soot

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Efficient One-Pot Synthesis of a Hexamethylenetetramine-Doped Cu-BDC Metal-Organic Framework with Enhanced CO2 Adsorption
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(8), 1063; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9081063 - 24 Jul 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Herein we report a facile, efficient, low cost, and easily scalable route for an amine-functionalized MOF (metal organic framework) synthesis. Cu-BDC⊃HMTA (HMTA = hexamethylenetetramine) has high nitrogen content and improved thermal stability when compared with the previously reported and well-studied parent Cu-BDC MOF [...] Read more.
Herein we report a facile, efficient, low cost, and easily scalable route for an amine-functionalized MOF (metal organic framework) synthesis. Cu-BDC⊃HMTA (HMTA = hexamethylenetetramine) has high nitrogen content and improved thermal stability when compared with the previously reported and well-studied parent Cu-BDC MOF (BDC = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate). Cu-BDC⊃HMTA was obtained via the same synthetic method, but with the addition of HMTA in a single step synthesis. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that Cu-BDC⊃HMTA is more thermally stable than Cu-BDC MOF. Cu-BDC⊃HMTA exhibited a CO2 uptake of 21.2 wt % at 273 K and 1 bar, which compares favorably to other nitrogen-containing MOF materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Pollutant Gases Reduction and Abatement)
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Open AccessArticle
Critical Admission Temperature of H2 and CH4 in Nanopores of Exchanged ERI Zeolites
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 160; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020160 - 29 Jan 2019
Abstract
Due to the nanoporous nature of zeolitic materials, they can be used as gas adsorbents. This paper describes the effect of critical admission temperature through narrow pores of natural ERI zeolites at low levels of coverage. This phenomenon occurs by adsorption of CH [...] Read more.
Due to the nanoporous nature of zeolitic materials, they can be used as gas adsorbents. This paper describes the effect of critical admission temperature through narrow pores of natural ERI zeolites at low levels of coverage. This phenomenon occurs by adsorption of CH4 and H2 on pores in natural erionite. The zeolite was exchanged with aqueous solutions of Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ salts at different concentrations, times, and temperatures of treatment. Experimental data of CH4 and H2 adsorption were treated by the Langmuir equation. Complementarily, the degree of interaction of these gases with these zeolites was evaluated by the evolution of isosteric heats of adsorption. The Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations favor the adsorption phenomena of H2 and CH4. These cations occupy sites in strategic positions Ca1, Ca2, and Ca3, which are located in the nanocavities of erionite zeolites and K2 in the center of 8MR. Following the conditions of temperature and the exchange treatment, ERICa2 and ERINa3 samples showed the best behavior for CH4 and H2 adsorption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Pollutant Gases Reduction and Abatement)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation of Filtration Sorptive Materials from Nanofibers, Bicofibers, and Textile Adsorbents without Binders Employment
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 564; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080564 - 24 Jul 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
The article deals with the preparation and possibilities of using combined filtration sorption systems usable for the construction of folded filters or respirators. The studied materials are made of several structural layers—a filter membrane made of polymeric nanofibers, an adsorbent containing active carbon [...] Read more.
The article deals with the preparation and possibilities of using combined filtration sorption systems usable for the construction of folded filters or respirators. The studied materials are made of several structural layers—a filter membrane made of polymeric nanofibers, an adsorbent containing active carbon or porous silicon dioxide nanofibers, and a supporting or cover nonwoven bicomponent fabric. The layers are connected only by pressure at an elevated temperature without the use of binders, according to utility model PUV 31 375. The result is a compact fabric material of textile character with a high permeability, good mechanical resistance, which effectively catches the submicron particles and the gases of the organic substances. The prepared samples of the filter sorptive material have been evaluated not only from the point of view of morphology and microstructure, but also from the point of view of the capture of pollutants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Pollutant Gases Reduction and Abatement)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review on Catalytic Nanomaterials for Volatile Organic Compounds VOC Removal and Their Applications for Healthy Buildings
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 910; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060910 - 23 Jun 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
In order to improve the indoor air quality, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be removed via an efficient approach by using catalysts. This review proposed a comprehensive summary of various nanomaterials for thermal/photo-catalytic removal of VOCs. These representative materials are mainly categorized as [...] Read more.
In order to improve the indoor air quality, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be removed via an efficient approach by using catalysts. This review proposed a comprehensive summary of various nanomaterials for thermal/photo-catalytic removal of VOCs. These representative materials are mainly categorized as carbon-based and metallic oxides materials, and their morphologies, synthesis techniques, and performances have been explained in detail. To improve the indoor and outdoor air quality, the catalytic nanomaterials can be utilized for emerging building applications such as VOC-reduction coatings, paints, air filters, and construction materials. Due to the characteristics of low cost, non-toxic and high chemical stability, metallic oxides such as TiO2 and ZnO have been widely investigated for decades and dominate the application market of VOC-removal catalyst in buildings. Since other catalysts also showed brilliant performance and have been theoretically researched, they can be potential candidates for applications in future healthy buildings. This review will contribute to further knowledge and greater potential applications of promising VOC-reducing catalytic nanomaterials on healthier buildings for a better indoor and outdoor environment well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Pollutant Gases Reduction and Abatement)
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