Special Issue "The Potential of Nanocomposites in the Packaging Field"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luciano Di Maio
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering of University of Salerno, Italy
Interests: Polymer processing and characterization; Polymeric nanocomposites; Polymeric films for food packaging; Multilayers films
Prof. Dr. Loredana Incarnato
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering of University of Salerno, Italy
Interests: Polymeric Food packaging materials; Active barrier polymeric films; Food packaging sustainability; Multilayer barrier films; Polymer rheology; Polymer recycling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

in recent years we are witnessing a deep evolution of food packaging materials and technologies, in response to the increasingly complex needs of the markets, of the distribution and of consumers. Packaging systems have therefore become increasingly sophisticated, adding new features that can be achieved thanks to the rapid evolution of new materials. In particular, the development of nanostructured materials and nanotechnologies has made it possible to implement and accelerate innovation in the field of food packaging. Actually, several applications of nanomaterials in packaging and food safety have been studied and developed including for instance polymer/clay nanocomposites as high barrier packaging materials, silver nanoparticles as potent antimicrobial agents, nanosensors and nanomaterial-based assays for the detection of food contaminants or control the packaging conditions integrity.

Furthermore, the increasing use of nanoparticle-based materials is bringing many concerns for the possible effects of their contact with food.

Thus, the above mentioned issues strongly need to be further investigated in order to exploit the several potentialities of nanotechnology which can not only enable safe and effective distribution and preservation of foods but can also facilitate their end-use suitability and sustainability both at producer and the consumer levels.

Papers aimed to cover current and future trends in experimental and/or computational (e.g., properties modeling and shelf life prediction of foods) studies, on the actual use and perspectives of nanocomposites materials in the field of Food Packaging will be very welcome.

Prof. Dr. Luciano Di Maio
Prof. Dr. Loredana Incarnato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • food packaging
  • polymeric films
  • nanocomposites
  • multilayers systems
  • biopolimers
  • bionanocomposites
  • nanoparticles
  • barrier properties
  • active packaging
  • transport properties
  • mechanical properties
  • thermal properties
  • antimicrobial packaging
  • antibacterial activity
  • food contact
  • food safety
  • migration
  • risk assessment
  • nanotoxicology
  • nanobiosensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Improving Interaction at Polymer–Filler Interface: The Efficacy of Wrinkle Texture
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020208 - 25 Jan 2020
Abstract
One of the main issues in preparing polymer-based nanocomposites with effective properties is to achieve a good dispersion of the nanoparticles into the matrix. Chemical interfacial modifications by specific coupling agents represents a good way to reach this objective. Actually, time consuming compatibilization [...] Read more.
One of the main issues in preparing polymer-based nanocomposites with effective properties is to achieve a good dispersion of the nanoparticles into the matrix. Chemical interfacial modifications by specific coupling agents represents a good way to reach this objective. Actually, time consuming compatibilization procedures strongly compromise the sustainability of these strategies. In this study, the role of particles’ architectures in their dispersion into a poly-lactic acid matrix and their subsequent influences on physical-chemical properties of the obtained nanocomposites were investigated. Two kinds of silica nanoparticles, “smooth” and “wrinkled,” with different surface areas (≈30 and ≈600 m2/g respectively) were synthesized through a modified Stöber method and used, without any chemical surface pre-treatments, as fillers to produce poly-lactic acid based nanocomposites. The key role played by wrinkled texture in modifying the physical interaction at the polymer-filler interface and in driving composite properties, was investigated and reflected in the final bulk properties. Detailed investigations revealed the presence of wrinkled nanoparticles, leading to (i) an enormous increase of the chain relaxation time, by almost 30 times compared to the neat PLA matrix; (ii) intensification of the shear-thinning behavior at low shear-rates; and (iii) slightly slower thermal degradation of polylactic acid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Potential of Nanocomposites in the Packaging Field)
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Open AccessArticle
PET and Active Coating Based on a LDH Nanofiller Hosting p-Hydroxybenzoate and Food-Grade Zeolites: Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Packaging and Shelf Life of Red Meat
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1727; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121727 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanofillers were considered as hosts of p-hydroxybenzoate as an antimicrobial molecule for active coating. A food grade resin with LDH-p-hydroxybenzoate and two different types of food grade zeolites was used to prepare active coatings for Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) trays. [...] Read more.
Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanofillers were considered as hosts of p-hydroxybenzoate as an antimicrobial molecule for active coating. A food grade resin with LDH-p-hydroxybenzoate and two different types of food grade zeolites was used to prepare active coatings for Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) trays. The release kinetics of the active molecule were followed using UV spectrophotometry and the experimental results were analyzed with the Gallagher–Corrigan model. The thermal properties of the coating mixtures and the PET coating were analyzed and found to be dependent on the coating’s composition. On the basis of CO2 transmission rate and off-odors tests, the best coating composition was selected. Global migration in ethanol (10% v/v), acetic acid (3% w/v), and vegetable oil, and specific migration of p-hydroxybenzoic acid revealed the suitability of the material for food contact. Antimicrobial tests on the packaging demonstrated a good inhibition against Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter jejuni. Red meat was packed into the selected active materials and results were compared to uncoated PET packaging. Color tests (browning of the meat) and analysis of Enterobacteriaceae spp. and total viable count evolution up to 10 days of storage demonstrated the capability of the considered active packaging in prolonging the shelf life of red meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Potential of Nanocomposites in the Packaging Field)
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