Special Issue "Design of Nanostructured Optic and Optoelectronic Devices"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Caterina Ciminelli
Website
Guest Editor
Optoelectronics Laboratory, Electrical and Information Engineering Department, Polytechnic University of Bari, Via Re David, 200, 70125 Bari, Italy
Interests: optoelectronic devices; photonic devices; optical devices; microelectronics; nanoelectronics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanostructured materials and top–down fabricated nanostructures have been extensively investigated and developed in the last decades, as their optoelectronic properties have allowed the study, design, and experimental testing of devices with interesting and sometimes unique features in terms of bandwidth, operation speed, efficiency, and energy consumption. The small size also leads to the integration of complex multifunctional systems in different technological platforms, potentially exploitable for large-scale production.

This Special Issue focuses on nano-optic and nano-optoelectronic passive/active devices and their applications in various fields, e.g., telecommunications, space, sensing, and medical, with a particular emphasis on aspects related to their modeling, design, and manufacturing.

Prof. Caterina Ciminelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanostructures
  • Nanomaterials
  • Light–matter interaction
  • Nano-optics
  • Nano-optoelectronics
  • Quantum optoelectronics
  • Nanofabrication
  • Nanomanipulation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Experiment and Simulation of a Selective Subwavelength Filter with a Low Index Contrast
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1497; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101497 - 21 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Subwavelength gratings have been of great interest recently due to their ability to eliminate multiple orders. However, high index contrast ( Δ n 3 ) is typically achieved using metals or high-index dielectrics surrounded by vacuum in order to maintain good optical [...] Read more.
Subwavelength gratings have been of great interest recently due to their ability to eliminate multiple orders. However, high index contrast ( Δ n 3 ) is typically achieved using metals or high-index dielectrics surrounded by vacuum in order to maintain good optical selectivity. Here, we theoretically propose and experimentally realize a selective subwavelength grating using an index contrast of Δ n 1.2 without vacuum. Despite its low index contrast, our simulation and experiments show that good optical selectivity is achieved using the same physics as subwavelength gratings made of high-index contrast. Such polymer-based encapsulated gratings are easier to scale up for use in large-area applications such as photovoltaics and lighting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Nanostructured Optic and Optoelectronic Devices)
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