Special Issue "Nanomaterials in CO2 Capture"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Prashant Kumar
Website
Guest Editor
Professor & Chair in Air Quality and Health, Founding Director, Global Centre for Clean Air Research (GCARE), University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK
Interests: exposure assessment; modelling and inequalities; indoor air quality; energy-pollution nexus; transport emission modelling; air pollution dispersion modelling; pollution control and environmental policies; green infrastructure interventions and health mapping; air-climate interactions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ming Zhao
Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Interests: CO2 capture and storage (CCS); biomass waste to energy via thermo-chemical processes; solid waste recycling technologies for added values; solid waste pollution control and soil remediation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Decarbonizing the global energy supply is a central challenge if the world is to achieve significant CO2 emission reductions necessary to avoid the dangers of climate change. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has been entrusted with about 20% of the reduction in anthropogenic CO2 emission. CO2 capture is essential for CCS, however, most of the current capture technologies are still on their way to commercialization, due to unacceptable economic and environmental impacts. Nano-scale tuning of sorbent materials has been regarded as an approachable way to enhance the efficiency and cost effectiveness of CO2 capture processes. The current Special Issue is, thus, named “Nanomaterials in CO2 Capture” and calls for submissions, including research articles, communications and reviews. The topics that would be covered in this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, nanomaterials (e.g., Calcium based; Magnesium based; Alkali zirconate; Alkali silicate; Hydrotalcite; MOFs; Carbon materials; Solid amine-based; Graphite/graphene-based; Zeolite-based; Silica-based; Polymer-based; Alkali metal carbonate-based; waste derived). Articles focusing on the environmental aspects related to nanomaterials, carbon capture or life cycle analysis will also be welcome.

Prof. Dr. Prashant Kumar
Prof. Dr. Ming Zhao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alkali earth based
  • alkali metal ceramics
  • hydrotalcite
  • MOFs
  • carbon materials
  • solid amine
  • zeolite-based
  • silica-based
  • polymer-based

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Structural Basis of CO2 Adsorption in a Flexible Metal-Organic Framework Material
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 354; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030354 - 04 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper reports on the structural basis of CO2 adsorption in a representative model of flexible metal-organic framework (MOF) material, Ni(1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene)[Ni(CN)4] (NiBpene or PICNIC-60). NiBpene exhibits a CO2 sorption isotherm with characteristic hysteresis and features on the desorption branch [...] Read more.
This paper reports on the structural basis of CO2 adsorption in a representative model of flexible metal-organic framework (MOF) material, Ni(1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene)[Ni(CN)4] (NiBpene or PICNIC-60). NiBpene exhibits a CO2 sorption isotherm with characteristic hysteresis and features on the desorption branch that can be associated with discrete structural changes. Various gas adsorption effects on the structure are demonstrated for CO2 with respect to N2, CH4 and H2 under static and flowing gas pressure conditions. For this complex material, a combination of crystal structure determination and density functional theory (DFT) is needed to make any real progress in explaining the observed structural transitions during adsorption/desorption. Possible enhancements of CO2 gas adsorption under supercritical pressure conditions are considered, together with the implications for future exploitation. In situ operando small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering, neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction under relevant gas pressure and flow conditions are discussed with respect to previous studies, including ex situ, a priori single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure determination. The results show how this flexible MOF material responds structurally during CO2 adsorption; single or dual gas flow results for structural change remain similar to the static (Sieverts) adsorption case, and supercritical CO2 adsorption results in enhanced gas uptake. Insights are drawn for this representative flexible MOF with implications for future flexible MOF sorbent design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in CO2 Capture)
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Open AccessArticle
Copper–Silver Bimetallic Nanowire Arrays for Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020173 - 30 Jan 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) into gaseous or liquid fuels has the potential to store renewable energies and reduce carbon emissions. Here, we report a three-step synthesis using Cu–Ag bimetallic nanowire arrays as catalysts for electrochemical reduction of CO [...] Read more.
The electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) into gaseous or liquid fuels has the potential to store renewable energies and reduce carbon emissions. Here, we report a three-step synthesis using Cu–Ag bimetallic nanowire arrays as catalysts for electrochemical reduction of CO2. CuO/Cu2O nanowires were first grown by thermal oxidation of copper mesh in ambient air and then reduced by annealing in the presence of hydrogen to form Cu nanowires. Cu–Ag bimetallic nanowires were then produced via galvanic replacement between Cu nanowires and the Ag+ precursor. The Cu–Ag nanowires showed enhanced catalytic performance over Cu nanowires for electrochemical reduction of CO2, which could be ascribed to the incorporation of Ag into Cu nanowires leading to suppression of hydrogen evolution. Our work provides a method for tuning the selectivity of copper nanocatalysts for CO2 reduction by controlling their composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in CO2 Capture)
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Open AccessArticle
An Evaluation of Graphene Oxides as Possible Foam Stabilizing Agents for CO2 Based Enhanced Oil Recovery
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 603; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080603 - 08 Aug 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Graphene oxide, nanographene oxide and partially reduced graphene oxide have been studied as possible foam stabilizing agents for CO2 based enhanced oil recovery. Graphene oxide was able to stabilize CO2/synthetic sea water foams, while nanographene oxide and partially reduced graphene [...] Read more.
Graphene oxide, nanographene oxide and partially reduced graphene oxide have been studied as possible foam stabilizing agents for CO2 based enhanced oil recovery. Graphene oxide was able to stabilize CO2/synthetic sea water foams, while nanographene oxide and partially reduced graphene oxide were not able to stabilize foams. The inability of nanographene oxide for stabilizing foams was explained by the increase of hydrophilicity due to size decrease, while for partially reduced graphene oxide, the high degree of reduction of the material was considered to be the reason. Graphene oxide brine dispersions showed immediate gel formation, which improved foam stability. Particle growth due to layer stacking was also observed. This mechanism was detrimental for foam stabilization. Gel formation and particle growth caused these particles to block pores and not being filterable. The work indicates that the particles studied are not suitable for CO2 enhanced oil recovery purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in CO2 Capture)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Sustainable Porous Carbon Materials Derived from Wood-Based Biopolymers for CO2 Capture
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010103 - 16 Jan 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
Porous carbon materials with tunable porosities and functionalities represent an important class of CO2 sorbents. The development of porous carbons from various types of biomass is a sustainable, economic and environmentally friendly strategy. Wood is a biodegradable, renewable, sustainable, naturally abundant and [...] Read more.
Porous carbon materials with tunable porosities and functionalities represent an important class of CO2 sorbents. The development of porous carbons from various types of biomass is a sustainable, economic and environmentally friendly strategy. Wood is a biodegradable, renewable, sustainable, naturally abundant and carbon-rich raw material. Given these advantages, the use of wood-based resources for the synthesis of functional porous carbons has attracted great interests. In this mini-review, we present the recent developments regarding sustainable porous carbons derived from wood-based biopolymers (cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin) and their application in CO2 capture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in CO2 Capture)
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