Special Issue "Laser Printing of Nanophotonic Structures"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Aleksandr Kuchmizhak
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Automation and Control Processes of FEB RAS; Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia
Interests: laser material processing, plasmonic and all-dielectric nanostructures, structured laser beams, sensors
Prof. Dr. Saulius Juodkazis
Website
Guest Editor
Swinburne University of Technology, John st., Hawthorn 3122, Victoria, Australia; Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, ANFF, 151 Wellington Road, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia
Interests: light–matter interactions occurring in the small space and on ultrashort time domains
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, fabrication of various nanostructures, nanotextured surfaces and nanomaterials using pulsed laser radiation have become a matured technology due to its straightforward operation, flexibility, competitive fabrication expenses and extremely high performance. Utilization of structured laser light (complex-shaped beams, specific pulse trains and repetition rates) is expected to expand functionality of existing laser-based nanofabrication techniques. Substantial progress in understanding of fundamentals behind interaction of ultrafast laser pulses with a matter (via fundamental experiments and simulations) is also considered to drive further progress in this field.

Considering extremely fast evolution of this research area, the proposed Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims at collecting papers covering fundamental and practical aspects of laser-assisted nanofabrication of various functional nanostructures and nanotextured surfaces. Along with surveying state-of-the-art laser-assisted nanofabrication techniques this issue also intends to provide a special emphasis on the optical and nonlinear optical properties of the fabricated nanostructures and their arrangements as well as relevant applications. Such applications may include (but not limited to) advanced nano-, bio- and chemo-sensors, ultrafast nanoscale devices, metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation, structural color generation, micro-optics for vis-IR-THz spectral ranges, lasing from microscale resonant structures, solar cell, catalysis, etc.

Dr. Aleksandr Kuchmizhak
Prof. Dr. Saulius Juodkazis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Direct laser printing/writing
  • Nanoablation and nanopatterning
  • Structured-light material processing
  • Laser induced periodic surface structures
  • Laser synthesis and laser ablation in liquids

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ablation in Externally Applied Electric and Magnetic Fields
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020182 - 21 Jan 2020
Abstract
To harness light-matter interactions at the nano-/micro-scale, better tools for control must be developed. Here, it is shown that by applying an external electric and/or magnetic field, ablation of Si and glass under ultra-short (sub-1 ps) laser pulse irradiation can be controlled via [...] Read more.
To harness light-matter interactions at the nano-/micro-scale, better tools for control must be developed. Here, it is shown that by applying an external electric and/or magnetic field, ablation of Si and glass under ultra-short (sub-1 ps) laser pulse irradiation can be controlled via the Lorentz force F = e E + e [ v × B ] , where v is velocity of charge e, E is the applied electrical bias and B is the magnetic flux density. The external electric E-field was applied during laser ablation using suspended micro-electrodes above a glass substrate with an air gap for the incident laser beam. The counter-facing Al-electrodes on Si surface were used to study debris formation patterns on Si. Debris was deposited preferentially towards the negative electrode in the case of glass and Si ablation. Also, an external magnetic field was applied during laser ablation of Si in different geometries and is shown to affect ripple formation. Chemical analysis of ablated areas with and without a magnetic field showed strong chemical differences, revealed by synchrotron near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) measurements. Harnessing the vectorial nature of the Lorentz force widens application potential of surface modifications and debris formation in external E-/B-fields, with potential applications in mass and charge spectroscopes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Printing of Nanophotonic Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
Ultrasensitive SERS-Based Plasmonic Sensor with Analyte Enrichment System Produced by Direct Laser Writing
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010049 - 24 Dec 2019
Abstract
We report an easy-to-implement device for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based detection of various analytes dissolved in water droplets at trace concentrations. The device combines an analyte-enrichment system and SERS-active sensor site, both produced via inexpensive and high-performance direct femtosecond (fs)-laser printing. Fabricated on [...] Read more.
We report an easy-to-implement device for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based detection of various analytes dissolved in water droplets at trace concentrations. The device combines an analyte-enrichment system and SERS-active sensor site, both produced via inexpensive and high-performance direct femtosecond (fs)-laser printing. Fabricated on a surface of water-repellent polytetrafluoroethylene substrate as an arrangement of micropillars, the analyte-enrichment system supports evaporating water droplet in the Cassie–Baxter superhydrophobic state, thus ensuring delivery of the dissolved analyte molecules towards the hydrophilic SERS-active site. The efficient pre-concentration of the analyte onto the sensor site based on densely arranged spiky plasmonic nanotextures results in its subsequent label-free identification by means of SERS spectroscopy. Using the proposed device, we demonstrate reliable SERS-based fingerprinting of various analytes, including common organic dyes and medical drugs at ppb concentrations. The proposed device is believed to find applications in various areas, including label-free environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, and forensics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Printing of Nanophotonic Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
External Field-Controlled Ablation: Magnetic Field
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1662; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121662 - 22 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The femtosecond laser ablation of silicon amidst an externally applied magnetic field in different orientations was investigated with respect to the scanning direction and polarisation of the laser beam, by observation of ablation patterns and debris displacement in a range of fluences, magnetic [...] Read more.
The femtosecond laser ablation of silicon amidst an externally applied magnetic field in different orientations was investigated with respect to the scanning direction and polarisation of the laser beam, by observation of ablation patterns and debris displacement in a range of fluences, magnetic fields strengths, and geometries. Ultra-short 230 fs laser pulses of 1030 nm wavelengths were utilised in the single and multi-pulse irradiation modes. Ablation with an externally applied magnetic B-field B e x t 0.15 T was shown to strongly affect debris formation and deposition. The mechanism of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave can explain the ablated periodic patterns observed with alignment along the magnetic field lines. The application potential of external field controlled ablation is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Printing of Nanophotonic Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
Laser-Inscribed Stress-Induced Birefringence of Sapphire
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1414; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101414 - 03 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Birefringence of 3 × 10 3 is demonstrated inside cross-sectional regions of 100 μ m, inscribed by axially stretched Bessel-beam-like fs-laser pulses along the c-axis inside sapphire. A high birefringence and retardance of λ / 4 at mid-visible spectral range (green) can [...] Read more.
Birefringence of 3 × 10 3 is demonstrated inside cross-sectional regions of 100 μ m, inscribed by axially stretched Bessel-beam-like fs-laser pulses along the c-axis inside sapphire. A high birefringence and retardance of λ / 4 at mid-visible spectral range (green) can be achieved using stretched beams with axial extension of 30–40 μ m. Chosen conditions of laser-writing ensure that there are no formations of self-organized nano-gratings. This method can be adopted for creation of polarization optical elements and fabrication of spatially varying birefringent patterns for optical vortex generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Printing of Nanophotonic Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
Multi-Purpose Nanovoid Array Plasmonic Sensor Produced by Direct Laser Patterning
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1348; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101348 - 20 Sep 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
We demonstrate a multi-purpose plasmonic sensor based on a nanovoid array fabricated via inexpensive and highly-reproducible direct femtosecond laser patterning of thin glass-supported Au films. The proposed nanovoid array exhibits near-IR surface plasmon (SP) resonances, which can be excited under normal incidence and [...] Read more.
We demonstrate a multi-purpose plasmonic sensor based on a nanovoid array fabricated via inexpensive and highly-reproducible direct femtosecond laser patterning of thin glass-supported Au films. The proposed nanovoid array exhibits near-IR surface plasmon (SP) resonances, which can be excited under normal incidence and optimised for specific applications by tailoring the array periodicity, as well as the nanovoid geometric shape. The fabricated SP sensor offers competitive sensitivity of ≈ 1600 nm/RIU at a figure of merit of 12 in bulk refractive index tests, as well as allows for identification of gases and ultra-thin analyte layers, making the sensor particularly useful for common bioassay experiments. Moreover, isolated nanovoids support strong electromagnetic field enhancement at lattice SP resonance wavelength, allowing for label-free molecular identification via surface-enhanced vibration spectroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Printing of Nanophotonic Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of Crystalline Microresonators of High Quality Factors with a Controllable Wedge Angle on Lithium Niobate on Insulator
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(9), 1218; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9091218 - 29 Aug 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
We report the fabrication of crystalline microresonators of high quality (Q) factors with a controllable wedge angle on lithium niobate on insulator (LNOI). Our technique relies on a femtosecond laser assisted chemo-mechanical polish, which allows us to achieve ultrahigh surface smoothness as critically [...] Read more.
We report the fabrication of crystalline microresonators of high quality (Q) factors with a controllable wedge angle on lithium niobate on insulator (LNOI). Our technique relies on a femtosecond laser assisted chemo-mechanical polish, which allows us to achieve ultrahigh surface smoothness as critically demanded by high Q microresonator applications. We show that by refining the polish parameters, Q factors as high as 4.7 × 107 can be obtained and the wedge angle of the LNOI can be continuously tuned from 9° to 51°. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Printing of Nanophotonic Structures)
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