Special Issue "Laser-Generated Periodic Nanostructures"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Peter Simon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laser-Laboratorium Göttingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany
Interests: periodic nanostructures; nanostructure formation by ultrashort laser pulses; laser interference ablation; diffractive beam management; compression of ultrashort laser pulses at high power levels
Dr. Jürgen Ihlemann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laser-Laboratorium Göttingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany
Interests: laser ablation; surface patterning; thin film patterning; transparent materials; periodic nanostructures; nanoparticles
Dr. Jörn Bonse
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin, Germany
Interests: laser–matter interaction; femtosecond laser technology; laser ablation; ultrashort laser pulses and applications; micro- and nanostructured surfaces; tribology, biomimetics, time-resolved diagnostics; laser processes in photovoltaics; laser safety
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of laser fabricated periodic nanostructures is one of the leading topics of today’s photonics research. Such structures on the surface of metals, semiconductors, dielectrics or polymers can generate new material properties with special functionalities. Depending on the specific material parameters and the morphology of the structures, new devices like microlasers, optical nanoswitches, optical storage devices, biosensors or antifraud features can be realized. Furthermore, surface textures can be used to improve the tribological properties of special tools for the reduction of friction losses or wear, to modify the wettability or the cell and biofilm growth properties of surfaces or as decoration elements for the refinement of precious goods.

This Special Issue focuses on the latest theoretical developments and practical applications of laser-induced periodic surface structures that can be generated in a self-organized way (LIPSS, ripples) or via laser interference ablation. It aims to attract both academic and industrial researchers in order to foster the current knowledge of nanomaterials and to present new ideas for future applications and new technologies.

Dr. Peter Simon
Dr. Jürgen Ihlemann
Dr. Jörn Bonse
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Periodic surface pattern
  • Laser ablation
  • Laser induced structures Beam interference
  • Periodic nanostructure
  • Surface ripples
  • Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS)
  • Self-organization
  • Laser applications

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Role of the Laser-Induced Oxide Layer in the Formation of Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010147 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are often present when processing solid targets with linearly polarized ultrashort laser pulses. The different irradiation parameters to produce them on metals, semiconductors and dielectrics have been studied extensively, identifying suitable regimes to tailor its properties for applications [...] Read more.
Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are often present when processing solid targets with linearly polarized ultrashort laser pulses. The different irradiation parameters to produce them on metals, semiconductors and dielectrics have been studied extensively, identifying suitable regimes to tailor its properties for applications in the fields of optics, medicine, fluidics and tribology, to name a few. One important parameter widely present when exposing the samples to the high intensities provided by these laser pulses in air environment, that generally is not considered, is the formation of a superficial laser-induced oxide layer. In this paper, we fabricate LIPSS on a layer of the oxidation prone hard-coating material chromium nitride in order to investigate the impact of the laser-induced oxide layer on its formation. A variety of complementary surface analytic techniques were employed, revealing morphological, chemical and structural characteristics of well-known high-spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) together with a new type of low-spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL) with an anomalous orientation parallel to the laser polarization. Based on this input, we performed finite-difference time-domain calculations considering a layered system resembling the geometry of the HSFL along with the presence of a laser-induced oxide layer. The simulations support a scenario that the new type of LSFL is formed at the interface between the laser-induced oxide layer and the non-altered material underneath. These findings suggest that LSFL structures parallel to the polarization can be easily induced in materials that are prone to oxidation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser-Generated Periodic Nanostructures)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop