Special Issue "Carbon-Based Nanomaterials and Sensor"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 7 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Petr Slobodian
Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University, Zlin, Czech Republic
Interests: carbon nanotubes (CNT); CNT chemistry; CNT networks; CNT polymer composites; hybrid polymer/CNT composites with Ag nanoparticles, graphene, carbon nanowalls (CNW); technology of gas and strain sensors; thermoelectric polymer composites, polymer composites and Joule heating

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon-based nanomaterials like carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite flakes, graphite, carbon nanowalls, carbon fibers, carbon black etc., possess multiple exceptional properties, which make them valuable in various applications, for example, as carbon based electro-mechanical, electro-chemical and strain, temperature, humidity, vapors or gases sensors, biosensors, stretchable electronic skin, or at the same time usually they can pose multifunctional properties etc.

Carbon-based nanomaterials can be also used as dispersed particles in matrix or in the form of self-supported three-dimensional an inter-connected tangled network for example as CNT paper (buckypaper) embedded in matrix.

Currently an electrically conductive and elastic polymer composite materials or conductive polymer composites (CPCs) are in focus of material scientists all over the world. Their potential applications are in the area of wearable sensors for healthcare related use, soft robotics, smart textiles, structural health monitoring, or bio-interactive electronic devices.

The titled Special Issue aims to cover current experimental and/or theoretical studies, in the field of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials and Sensor. Materials fabrication routes, their characterizations, functionalities as sensors for different kind of stimuli or explanation of detection principles, are very welcome.


Prof. Dr. Petr Slobodian
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene (GF)
  • Matrix/CNT or GF nanocomposites
  • Carbon based sensors for vapours
  • Sensors for stress or strain detection
  • Wearable electronics
  • Shape memory
  • Piezoresistive and piezoelectric materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Carbon Nanowalls (CNWs) Substrates on Soft Ionization of Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Compoundsin Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SALDI-MS)
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 262; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020262 - 20 Jan 2021
Abstract
Carbon nanowalls (CNWs), which are vertically oriented multi-layer graphene sheets, were employed in surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) measurements to detect low-molecular-weight organic compounds. CNWs substrates with widely different wall-to-wall distances from 142 to 467 nm were synthesized using a radical-injection plasma-enhanced [...] Read more.
Carbon nanowalls (CNWs), which are vertically oriented multi-layer graphene sheets, were employed in surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) measurements to detect low-molecular-weight organic compounds. CNWs substrates with widely different wall-to-wall distances from 142 to 467 nm were synthesized using a radical-injection plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RI-PECVD) system with nanosecond pulse biasing to a sample stage. When survival yield (SY) values of N-benzylpyridinium chloride (N-BP-Cl) were examined, which is commonly used to evaluate desorption/ionization efficiency, a narrower wall-to-wall distance presented a higher SY value. The highest SY value of 0.97 was realized at 4 mJ/cm2 for the highest-density CNWs with a wall-to-wall distance of 142 nm. The laser desorption/ionization effect of arginine, an amino acid, was also investigated. When CNWs with a narrower wall-to-wall distance were used, the signal-to-noise (SN) ratios of the arginine signals were increased, while the intensity ratios of fragment ions to arginine signals were suppressed. Therefore, the CNWs nanostructures are a powerful tool when used as a SALDI substrate for the highly efficient desorption/ionization of low-molecular-weight biomolecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon-Based Nanomaterials and Sensor)
Open AccessArticle
Oriented Carbon Nanostructures from Plasma Reformed Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Polymer Gels for Gas Sensor Applications
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(9), 1704; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10091704 - 29 Aug 2020
Abstract
Oriented carbon nanostructures (OCNs) with dominant graphitic characteristics have attracted research interest for various applications due to the excellent electrical and optical properties owing to their vertical orientation, interconnected structures, electronic properties, and large surface area. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is [...] Read more.
Oriented carbon nanostructures (OCNs) with dominant graphitic characteristics have attracted research interest for various applications due to the excellent electrical and optical properties owing to their vertical orientation, interconnected structures, electronic properties, and large surface area. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is considered as a promising method for the large-scale synthesis of OCNs. Alternatively, structural reformation of natural carbon precursor or phenol-based polymers using plasma-assisted surface treatment is also considered for the fabrication of OCNs. In this work, we have demonstrated a fast technique for the synthesis of OCNs by plasma-assisted structure reformation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) polymer gels using radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma (rf-ICP). A thin layer of RF polymer gel cast on a glass substrate was used as the carbon source and treated with rf plasma under different plasma discharge conditions. Argon and hydrogen gases were used in surface treatment, and the growth of carbon nanostructures at different discharge parameters was systematically examined. This study explored the influence of the gas flow rate, the plasma power, and the treatment time on the structural reformation of polymer gel to produce OCNs. Moreover, the gas-sensing properties of as-prepared OCNs towards ethanol at atmospheric conditions were also investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon-Based Nanomaterials and Sensor)
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Open AccessArticle
Facile Fabrication of CeO2/Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites for Vanillin Detection in Commercial Food Products
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(7), 1356; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10071356 - 11 Jul 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
In this paper, CeO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by the solvothermal method and dispersed uniformly in graphene oxide (GO) aqueous solution by ultrasonication. The homogeneous CeO2-GO dispersion was coated on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and the CeO [...] Read more.
In this paper, CeO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by the solvothermal method and dispersed uniformly in graphene oxide (GO) aqueous solution by ultrasonication. The homogeneous CeO2-GO dispersion was coated on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and the CeO2/electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified electrode (CeO2/ERGO/GCE) was obtained by potentiostatic reduction. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that CeO2 nanocrystals were uniformly coated by gossamer like ERGO nanosheets. The electrochemical behavior of vanillin on the CeO2/ERGO/GCE was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV). It was found that the CeO2/ERGO/GCE has high electrocatalytic activity and good electrochemical performance for vanillin oxidation. Using the second derivative linear sweep voltammetry (SDLSV), the CeO2/ERGO/GCE provides a wide range of 0.04–20 µM and 20 µM–100 µM for vanillin detection, and the detection limit is estimated to be 0.01 µM after 120 s accumulation. This method has been successfully applied to the vanillin detection in some commercial foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon-Based Nanomaterials and Sensor)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.


 

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