Special Issue "Carbon-Based Nanostructures and Nanocomposites for Health and Environmental Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Silvia Scalese

Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM), Catania, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis and characterization of carbon nanostructures; nanomaterials and nanocomposites for sensing; water purification; water splitting applications; surface characterization; photocatalytic processes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies are innovating many aspects of our daily life. The size reduction of materials gives them unique properties that, if suitably exploited, allow to groundbreaking results to be obtained in several application fields. In particular, health and environment are fields where the use of nanomaterials has provided an important contribution—for example, in gas or bio-sensors, theranostics, air and water pollution removal, renewable energy production, and so on. Among nanomaterials, carbon nanostructures and related nanocomposites are important and are extensively studied.

This Special Issue aims to collect manuscripts dealing with the use of carbon nanostructures (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene oxide) alone or in combination with other nanomaterials (metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles) or even as a part of polymeric nanocomposites, focused on health applications or to solve different environmental issues. Subjects that fall into the scope of this Special Issue include: functionalization methodologies of carbon nanostructures; the preparation of carbon-based nanocomposites; electrical and structural characterization; physico-chemical interaction with gases, contaminants or bio-markers; adsorption and/or filtration properties; and photocatalytic properties.

Manuscripts can be submitted in the following formats: full research papers, communications, and reviews.

Dr. Silvia Scalese
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon nanostructures
  • nanocomposites
  • synthesis and characterization
  • surface functionalization
  • photocatalytic and adsorption properties
  • sensing applications
  • water and air purification
  • materials for water splitting
  • health applications
  • environmental applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Preparation, Characterization and Adsorption Potential of Grainy Halloysite-CNT Composites for Anthracene Removal from Aqueous Solution
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 890; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060890
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 8 June 2019 / Accepted: 10 June 2019 / Published: 17 June 2019
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Abstract
Grainy Hal-CNT composites were prepared from powder halloysite nanoclay (Hal) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The effect of the amount and type of CNTs, as well as calcination temperature on morphology and properties of Hal-CNT composites and their adsorption capacity of anthracene (ANT), were [...] Read more.
Grainy Hal-CNT composites were prepared from powder halloysite nanoclay (Hal) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The effect of the amount and type of CNTs, as well as calcination temperature on morphology and properties of Hal-CNT composites and their adsorption capacity of anthracene (ANT), were studied. The surface topography of granules was heterogenous, with cracks and channels created during granulation of powder clay and CNTs. In FTIR, spectra were exhibited only in the bands arising from halloysite, due to its dominance in the granules. The increase in the heating temperature to 550 °C resulted in mesoporosity/macroporosity of the granules, the lowest specific surface area (SSA) and poorest adsorption potential. Overall, SSA of all Hal-CNT composites were higher than raw Hal, and by itself, heated halloysite. The larger amount of CNTs enhanced adsorption kinetics due to the more external adsorption sites. The equilibrium was established with the contact time of approximately 30 min for the sample Hal-SWCNT 85:15, while the samples with loading 96:4, it was 60–90 min. Adsorption isotherms for ANT showed L1 type, which is representative for the sorbents with limited adsorption capacity. The Langmuir model described the adsorption process, suggesting a monolayer covering. The sample Hal-SWCNT 85:15 exhibited the highest adsorption capacity of ANT, due to its highest SSA and microporous character. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Detection of Ultratrace Lead Ion through Attaching and Detaching DNA Aptamer from Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrode
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 817; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060817
Received: 1 May 2019 / Revised: 25 May 2019 / Accepted: 28 May 2019 / Published: 30 May 2019
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Abstract
This paper describes a simple strategy for the ultratrace level detection of Pb2+ ion based on G-quadruplex DNA and an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) electrode. First, ERGO was formed on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by the reduction of graphene oxide [...] Read more.
This paper describes a simple strategy for the ultratrace level detection of Pb2+ ion based on G-quadruplex DNA and an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) electrode. First, ERGO was formed on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using cyclic voltammetry. Subsequently, a methylene blue (MB)-tagged, guanine-rich DNA aptamer (Apt) was attached to the surface of ERGO via π-π interaction, leading to the Apt-modified ERGO electrode. The presence of Pb2+ could generate the folding of Apt to a G-quadruplex structure. The formation of G-quadruplex resulted in detaching the Apt from the ERGO/GCE, leading to a change in redox current of the MB tag. Electrochemical measurements showed the proposed sensor had an exceptional sensitivity for Pb2+ with a linear range from 10−15 to 10−9 M and a detection limit of 0.51 fM. The sensor also exhibited high selectivity for Pb2+, as well as many other advantages, such as stability, reproducibility, regeneration, as well as simple fabrication and operation processes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation of N-Doped Carbon Nanosheets from Sewage Sludge for Adsorption Studies of Cr(VI) from Aqueous Solution
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020265
Received: 21 January 2019 / Revised: 9 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2579 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Porous activated carbon with specific morphology and structure are of particular importance for waste water treatment, especially for the adsorption of toxic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI). However, the scalable and cheap production of such absorbents still suffer a grand challenge. Herein, a new type [...] Read more.
Porous activated carbon with specific morphology and structure are of particular importance for waste water treatment, especially for the adsorption of toxic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI). However, the scalable and cheap production of such absorbents still suffer a grand challenge. Herein, a new type of N-doped nanosheet was innovatively prepared from easily available and low-cost sewage sludge via a facile and recyclable KOH activation method. The N-doped porous carbon nanosheets (N-SAC) produced by introduction of KOH and dicyandiamide, which performed favourable features for metal ions adsorption (93.2% for Cr(VI)) due to its high specific surface area, tuneable pore size distributions and good hydrophilicity. Additionally, the capacity also remained high after two cycles of adsorption by thermal regeneration, with 90.8% removal rate. The DFT calculation also approved that the doping of N could optimize the Mulliken charges distribution and improve the HOMO energy and improve the adsorption ability of N-SAC. This original proposal may inspire new possibility of creating porous carbon absorbents in a recyclable method. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Biosynthesized Highly Stable Au/C Nanodots: Ideal Probes for the Selective and Sensitive Detection of Hg2+ Ions
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020245
Received: 23 January 2019 / Revised: 3 February 2019 / Accepted: 7 February 2019 / Published: 12 February 2019
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Abstract
The enormous ongoing industrial development has caused serious water pollution which has become a major crisis, particularly in developing countries. Among the various water pollutants, non-biodegradable heavy metal ions are the most prevalent. Thus, trace-level detection of these metal ions using a simple [...] Read more.
The enormous ongoing industrial development has caused serious water pollution which has become a major crisis, particularly in developing countries. Among the various water pollutants, non-biodegradable heavy metal ions are the most prevalent. Thus, trace-level detection of these metal ions using a simple technique is essential. To address this issue, we have developed a fluorescent probe of Au/C nanodots (GCNDs-gold carbon nanodots) using an eco-friendly method based on an extract from waste onion leaves (Allium cepa-red onions). The leaves are rich in many flavonoids, playing a vital role in the formation of GCNDs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning transmission electron microscopy-Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) elemental mapping clearly indicated that the newly synthesized materials are approximately 2 nm in size. The resulting GCNDs exhibited a strong orange fluorescence with excitation at 380 nm and emission at 610 nm. The GCNDs were applied as a fluorescent probe for the detection of Hg2+ ions. They can detect ultra-trace concentrations of Hg2+ with a detection limit of 1.3 nM. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results facilitated the identification of a clear detection mechanism. We also used the new probe on a real river water sample. The newly developed sensor is highly stable with a strong fluorescent property and can be used for various applications such as in catalysis and biomedicine. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Facile Electrochemical Sensor for Nanomolar Rutin Detection Based on Magnetite Nanoparticles and Reduced Graphene Oxide Decorated Electrode
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010115
Received: 24 December 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 14 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (3265 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A new electrochemical sensor for nanomolar rutin detection based on amine-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode (NH2-Fe3O4 NPs-ErGO/GCE) was fabricated through a simple method, and the X-ray diffraction [...] Read more.
A new electrochemical sensor for nanomolar rutin detection based on amine-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode (NH2-Fe3O4 NPs-ErGO/GCE) was fabricated through a simple method, and the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and electrochemical technique were used to characterize the modified electrode. The electrochemical behavior of rutin on the Fe3O4 NPs-ErGO/GCE was studied in detail. The electrochemical response of rutin at this modified electrode was remarkably higher than that of the bare GCE or other modified GCE (GO/GCE, Fe3O4 NPs-GO/GCE, and ErGO/GCE). Under the optimum determination conditions, Fe3O4 NPs-ErGO/GCE provided rutin with a broader detection range of 6.0 nM–0.1 µM; 0.1–8.0 µM and 8.0–80 µM, a minimum detectable concentration of 4.0 nM was obtained after 210 s accumulation. This novel method was applied in determination of rutin in pharmaceutical tablets and urine samples with satisfactory results. Full article
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