Special Issue "Carbon Based Hybrid Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Vassilis Tangoulis
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, Patra, Greece
Interests: hybrid carbon based nano-materials; encapsulation/decoration of functionalized multi-wall nanotubes with Single Molecule Magnets (SMMs) and the study of their magnetic behaviour; application of hybrid materials in the area of spintronics or medicine (MRI agents)
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon is important for many technological applications, ranging from drugs to synthetic materials. This role is a consequence of carbon’s ability to bind to itself and to nearly all elements in almost limitless variety. The resulting structural diversity of organic compounds and molecules is accompanied by a broad range of chemical and physical properties.

Considering more recent developments, the miniaturization of material dimensions, components, and structures nowadays is reaching dimensions of nanometers, and nano-sized, carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials include several modifications and geometries, such as nanocrystalline diamond, amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC), carbon-based aerogels, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), while some other new developments, including fullerenes and graphene, are still in their infancy.

This Special Issue will attempt to cover cutting-edge research, and several applications within the fields of energy, microelectronics, biomedicine, and beyond, while at the same time presenting market opportunities for carbon-based nanoscale materials and devices in the future. In a parallel manner, various synthetic routes for carbon-based nanomaterials will be presented, including chemical and physical routes, top-down (e.g., exfoliation), and bottom-up (e.g., chemical vapor deposition).  This Special Issue will also attempt to present the progress in the synthesis, preparation, and characterization of various hybrids based on carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene oxide, and their derivatives, with various inorganic components such as nanosized oxides, noble metallic nanoparticles, normal metals, non-graphene nanocarbons (carbon nanotubes or carbon nanofibers), semiconductor nanoparticles, and inorganic complexes (SMMs, spin crossover nanoparticles).

Dr. Vassilis Tangoulis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Carbon Nanotubes
  • Characterization
  • Graphene
  • graphene-oxide
  • Nanocrystalline diamond
  • Carbon-based aerogels
  • Fullerenes
  • Amorphous, diamond-like carbon

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Precursor C2H2 Fraction on Microstructure and Properties of Amorphous Carbon Composite Films Containing Si and Ag Prepared by Magnetron Sputtering Deposition
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 528; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040528 - 03 Apr 2019
Abstract
Hydrogenated graphite-like carbon composite films containing silicon (Si) and silver (Ag) (g-C:H:Si:Ag) were prepared by middle frequency magnetron sputtering deposition in argon (Ar) and acetylene (C2H2) mixture gases. The effects of precursor C2H2 fraction on the [...] Read more.
Hydrogenated graphite-like carbon composite films containing silicon (Si) and silver (Ag) (g-C:H:Si:Ag) were prepared by middle frequency magnetron sputtering deposition in argon (Ar) and acetylene (C2H2) mixture gases. The effects of precursor C2H2 fraction on the microstructure and properties were studied. The results of Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) revealed that the films were dominated by sp2 carbon sites. It was observed from transmission electron microscope (TEM) that the films contained nanoparticles mainly consisting of Ag, and their size increased with the decrease in the C2H2 fraction. Si was also found to aggregate in the areas where Ag nanoparticles formed in films with high Si content. The comparative studies on the frictional behaviors of films sliding against aluminum oxide were carried out in ambient air and saline solution. The g-C:H:Si:Ag films still exhibited outstanding frictional properties even when the test environment shifts from ambient air to saline solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Based Hybrid Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Copolymers and Hybrids Based on Carbazole Derivatives and Their Nanomorphology Investigation
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020133 - 22 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Oligomers of the low-band-gap PCDTBT polymer, based on either 3,6 or 2,7 carbazole units, were modified with vinyl ω-chain end functionalities. The vinyl-functionalized oligomers were used as comonomers in free radical polymerizations with quinoline-based monomers such as 6-vinylphenyl-(2-pyridinyl)-4-phenyl-quinoline (vinyl-QPy), and 6-vinylphenyl-(2-perfluorophenyl)-4-phenyl quinoline (vinyl-5FQ). [...] Read more.
Oligomers of the low-band-gap PCDTBT polymer, based on either 3,6 or 2,7 carbazole units, were modified with vinyl ω-chain end functionalities. The vinyl-functionalized oligomers were used as comonomers in free radical polymerizations with quinoline-based monomers such as 6-vinylphenyl-(2-pyridinyl)-4-phenyl-quinoline (vinyl-QPy), and 6-vinylphenyl-(2-perfluorophenyl)-4-phenyl quinoline (vinyl-5FQ). The co-polymeric materials bearing the vinyl-QPy moiety were developed as potential compatibilizers in polymer electron donor–fullerene acceptor blends for non-covalent interactions with the fullerene part. The co-polymeric materials bearing the vinyl-5FQ moiety were developed for the covalent attachment of carbon nanostructures; specifically, PC61BM. Both copolymers and hybrids, after thorough purification, were characterized in terms of their spectroscopic and optical properties as well as their ability to form nanophased separated films as such, or as additives at various percentages into PCDTBT: PC71BM blends. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Based Hybrid Nanomaterials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recovery of Rare Earth Elements by Carbon-Based Nanomaterials—A Review
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 814; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060814 - 29 May 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
Modern societies depend strongly on electronic and electric equipment (EEE) which has a side effect result on the large production of electronic wastes (e-waste). This has been regarded as a worldwide issue, because of its environmental impact—namely due to non-adequate treatment and storage [...] Read more.
Modern societies depend strongly on electronic and electric equipment (EEE) which has a side effect result on the large production of electronic wastes (e-waste). This has been regarded as a worldwide issue, because of its environmental impact—namely due to non-adequate treatment and storage limitations. In particular, EEE is dependent on the availability of rare earth elements (REEs), considered as the “vitamins” of modern industry, due to their crucial role in the development of new cutting-edge technologies. High demand and limited resources of REEs in Europe, combined with potential environmental problems, enforce the development of innovative low-cost techniques and materials to recover these elements from e-waste and wastewaters. In this context, sorption methods have shown advantages to pre-concentrate REEs from wastewaters and several studies have reported the use of diverse nanomaterials for these purposes, although mostly describing the sorption of REEs from synthetic and mono-elemental solutions at unrealistic metal concentrations. This review is a one-stop-reference by bringing together recent research works in the scope of the application of carbon nanomaterials for the recovery of REEs from water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Based Hybrid Nanomaterials)
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