Special Issue "Advances in Nanowire"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Francesca Rossi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IMEM-CNR, Parma, Italy
Interests: nanowires; heterostructures; transmission electron microscopy; cathodoluminescence

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanowires are 1D nanostructures with a nanoscale diameter (from a few to 100–200 nm) and a microscale length (from around one to several tens of microns). Thanks to their unique properties (e.g., large surface area, effective strain relaxation, and quantum confinement effects), they often provide superior results with respect to their bulk or thin-film counterparts.

Different materials—either metals, semiconductors, oxides, or polymers—can be obtained in the form of nanowires, through different physicochemical synthesis routes, and can be combined in axial or radial heterostructures. Nanowires have a great potential in the design and realization of the next generation of devices, mainly in the field of photodetectors, photocatalysis, photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, sensing, quantum information processing, and even biomedical and drug delivery approaches.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will attempt to cover the most recent advances in nanowires, concerning experimental, theoretical, and technological aspects, ranging from the material synthesis, functionalization, and characterization to the proof of concept of functional and smart properties for device applications.

Dr. Francesca Rossi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • synthesis
  • characterization
  • functionalization
  • modelling
  • multifunctional materials
  • nanowire-based devices

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Article
Semiconductor Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors as Sensitive Detectors in the Far-Infrared
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(12), 3378; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123378 - 13 Dec 2021
Viewed by 473
Abstract
Engineering detection dynamics in nanoscale receivers that operate in the far infrared (frequencies in the range 0.1–10 THz) is a challenging task that, however, can open intriguing perspectives for targeted applications in quantum science, biomedicine, space science, tomography, security, process and quality control. [...] Read more.
Engineering detection dynamics in nanoscale receivers that operate in the far infrared (frequencies in the range 0.1–10 THz) is a challenging task that, however, can open intriguing perspectives for targeted applications in quantum science, biomedicine, space science, tomography, security, process and quality control. Here, we exploited InAs nanowires (NWs) to engineer antenna-coupled THz photodetectors that operated as efficient bolometers or photo thermoelectric receivers at room temperature. We controlled the core detection mechanism by design, through the different architectures of an on-chip resonant antenna, or dynamically, by varying the NW carrier density through electrostatic gating. Noise equivalent powers as low as 670 pWHz−1/2 with 1 µs response time at 2.8 THz were reached. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanowire)
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Article
Silver Nanowire Networks: Ways to Enhance Their Physical Properties and Stability
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(11), 2785; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11112785 - 21 Oct 2021
Viewed by 577
Abstract
Silver nanowire (AgNW) networks have been intensively investigated in recent years. Thanks to their attractive physical properties in terms of optical transparency and electrical conductivity, as well as their mechanical performance, AgNW networks are promising transparent electrodes (TE) for several devices, such as [...] Read more.
Silver nanowire (AgNW) networks have been intensively investigated in recent years. Thanks to their attractive physical properties in terms of optical transparency and electrical conductivity, as well as their mechanical performance, AgNW networks are promising transparent electrodes (TE) for several devices, such as solar cells, transparent heaters, touch screens or light-emitting devices. However, morphological instabilities, low adhesion to the substrate, surface roughness and ageing issues may limit their broader use and need to be tackled for a successful performance and long working lifetime. The aim of the present work is to highlight efficient strategies to optimize the physical properties of AgNW networks. In order to situate our work in relation to existing literature, we briefly reported recent studies which investigated physical properties of AgNW networks. First, we investigated the optimization of optical transparency and electrical conductivity by comparing two types of AgNWs with different morphologies, including PVP layer and AgNW dimensions. In addition, their response to thermal treatment was deeply investigated. Then, zinc oxide (ZnO) and tin oxide (SnO2) protective films deposited by Atmospheric Pressure Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition (AP-SALD) were compared for one type of AgNW. We clearly demonstrated that coating AgNW networks with these thin oxide layers is an efficient approach to enhance the morphological stability of AgNWs when subjected to thermal stress. Finally, we discussed the main future challenges linked with AgNW networks optimization processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanowire)
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Article
Imaging Thermoelectric Properties at the Nanoscale
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(5), 1199; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11051199 - 01 May 2021
Viewed by 631
Abstract
Based on our previous experimental AFM set-up specially designed for thermal conductivity measurements at the nanoscale, we have developed and validated a prototype which offers two major advantages. On the one hand, we can simultaneously detect various voltages, providing, at the same time, [...] Read more.
Based on our previous experimental AFM set-up specially designed for thermal conductivity measurements at the nanoscale, we have developed and validated a prototype which offers two major advantages. On the one hand, we can simultaneously detect various voltages, providing, at the same time, both thermal and electrical properties (thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient). On the other hand, the AFM approach enables sufficient spatial resolution to produce images of nanostructures such as nanowires (NWs). After a software and hardware validation, we show the consistency of the signals measured on a gold layer on a silicon substrate. Finally, we demonstrate that the imaging of Ge NWs can be achieved with the possibility to extract physical properties such as electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient, paving the way to a quantitative estimation of the figure of merit of nanostructures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanowire)
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Article
Giant Magnetoresistance and Magneto-Thermopower in 3D Interconnected NixFe1−x/Cu Multilayered Nanowire Networks
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(5), 1133; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11051133 - 27 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 613
Abstract
The versatility of the template-assisted electrodeposition technique to fabricate complex three-dimensional networks made of interconnected nanowires allows one to easily stack ferromagnetic and non-magnetic metallic layers along the nanowire axis. This leads to the fabrication of unique multilayered nanowire network films showing giant [...] Read more.
The versatility of the template-assisted electrodeposition technique to fabricate complex three-dimensional networks made of interconnected nanowires allows one to easily stack ferromagnetic and non-magnetic metallic layers along the nanowire axis. This leads to the fabrication of unique multilayered nanowire network films showing giant magnetoresistance effect in the current-perpendicular-to-plane configuration that can be reliably measured along the macroscopic in-plane direction of the films. Moreover, the system also enables reliable measurements of the analogous magneto-thermoelectric properties of the multilayered nanowire networks. Here, three-dimensional interconnected NixFe1x/Cu multilayered nanowire networks (with 0.60x0.97) are fabricated and characterized, leading to large magnetoresistance and magneto-thermopower ratios up to 17% and −25% in Ni80Fe20/Cu, respectively. A strong contrast is observed between the amplitudes of magnetoresistance and magneto-thermoelectric effects depending on the Ni content of the NiFe alloys. In particular, for the highest Ni concentrations, a strong increase in the magneto-thermoelectric effect is observed, more than a factor of 7 larger than the magnetoresistive effect for Ni97Fe3/Cu multilayers. This sharp increase is mainly due to an increase in the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient from −7 µV/K for the Ni60Fe40/Cu and Ni70Fe30/Cu nanowire arrays to −21 µV/K for the Ni97Fe3/Cu nanowire array. The enhancement of the magneto-thermoelectric effect for multilayered nanowire networks based on dilute Ni alloys is promising for obtaining a flexible magnetic switch for thermoelectric generation for potential applications in heat management or logic devices using thermal energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanowire)
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Article
Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes Using Plasma-Assisted CVD Catalyzed by Cu Nanoparticles and Oxygen
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(3), 651; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030651 - 08 Mar 2021
Viewed by 771
Abstract
We found that oxidized Cu nanoparticles can catalyze the growth of boron nitride nanotubes from borazine via plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The Raman spectra suggest that the formation of thin-walled nanotubes show a radial breathing mode vibration. The presence of oxygen in the [...] Read more.
We found that oxidized Cu nanoparticles can catalyze the growth of boron nitride nanotubes from borazine via plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The Raman spectra suggest that the formation of thin-walled nanotubes show a radial breathing mode vibration. The presence of oxygen in the plasma environment was necessary for the growth of the nanotubes, and a part of the nanotubes had a core shell structure with a cupper species inside it. In atomic resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images, Cu2O was found at the interface between the Cu-core and turbostratic BN-shell. The growth mechanism seemed different from that of carbon nanotube core-shell structures. Therefore, we pointed out the important role of the dynamic morphological change in the Cu2O-Cu system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanowire)
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Article
Silicon Nanotubes Fabricated by Wet Chemical Etching of ZnO/Si Core–Shell Nanowires
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2535; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122535 - 17 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 696
Abstract
Silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) have garnered a great deal of interest for both their synthesis and their potential for application to high-capacity energy storage, biosensors, and selective transport. In this study, we report a convenient and low-cost route to the fabrication of vertically aligned [...] Read more.
Silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) have garnered a great deal of interest for both their synthesis and their potential for application to high-capacity energy storage, biosensors, and selective transport. In this study, we report a convenient and low-cost route to the fabrication of vertically aligned SiNTs via a wet-etching process that enables the control of the wall thickness of SiNTs by varying the gas flux and growth temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization showed the resultant SiNTs to have an amorphous nature and a hexagonal hollow core. These SiNTs can be crystallized by thermal annealing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanowire)
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Article
Generating Silicon Nanofiber Clusters from Grinding Sludge by Millisecond Pulsed Laser Irradiation
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 812; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040812 - 23 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1053
Abstract
Silicon nanofiber clusters were successfully generated by the irradiation of millisecond pulsed laser light on silicon sludge disposed from wafer back-grinding processes. It was found that the size, intensity, and growing speed of the laser-induced plume varied with the gas pressure, while the [...] Read more.
Silicon nanofiber clusters were successfully generated by the irradiation of millisecond pulsed laser light on silicon sludge disposed from wafer back-grinding processes. It was found that the size, intensity, and growing speed of the laser-induced plume varied with the gas pressure, while the size and morphology of the nanofibers were dependent on the laser pulse duration. The generated nanofibers were mainly amorphous with crystalline nanoparticles on their tips. The crystallinity and oxidation degree of the nanofibers depended on the preheating conditions of the silicon sludge. This study demonstrated the possibility of changing silicon waste into functional nanomaterials, which are possibly useful for fabricating high-performance lithium-ion battery electrodes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanowire)
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Article
Growth of Self-Catalyzed InAs/InSb Axial Heterostructured Nanowires: Experiment and Theory
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030494 - 10 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1701
Abstract
The growth mechanisms of self-catalyzed InAs/InSb axial nanowire heterostructures are thoroughly investigated as a function of the In and Sb line pressures and growth time. Some interesting phenomena are observed and analyzed. In particular, the presence of In droplet on top of InSb [...] Read more.
The growth mechanisms of self-catalyzed InAs/InSb axial nanowire heterostructures are thoroughly investigated as a function of the In and Sb line pressures and growth time. Some interesting phenomena are observed and analyzed. In particular, the presence of In droplet on top of InSb segment is shown to be essential for forming axial heterostructures in the self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mode. Axial versus radial growth rates of InSb segment are investigated under different growth conditions and described within a dedicated model containing no free parameters. It is shown that widening of InSb segment with respect to InAs stem is controlled by the vapor-solid growth on the nanowire sidewalls rather than by the droplet swelling. The In droplet can even shrink smaller than the nanowire facet under Sb-rich conditions. These results shed more light on the growth mechanisms of self-catalyzed heterostructures and give clear route for engineering the morphology of InAs/InSb axial nanowire heterostructures for different applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanowire)
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