Special Issue "Frontiers in Nanomaterials for Clinical Imaging and Selective Therapy"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Pablo Botella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Tecnología Química, Universitat Politècnica de València-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Valencia, Spain
Interests: Pablo Botella coordinates the Nanomedicine Group at the Instituto de Tecnología Química, addressing medical nanoscale-structured material and devices for targeted delivery and controlled release of drugs and other biologically active agents. Special interest is dedicated to the development of organic-inorganic nanohybrid-based stimuli-responsive systems, as well as stable radioactive nanoparticles for enhancing diagnostic imaging. Also important in his research is the study of the immune reaction and protein corona formation after nanoparticle systemic administration, as well as its application to new cancer biomarker detection
Prof. Christopher C. Landry
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Vermont, Burlington, United States
Interests: Christopher Landry is Chair of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Vermont. Over the past 22 years as an independent faculty member, he has studied the applications of porous nanoparticles in catalysis and biomedicine. He has prepared novel transition metal oxides for photocatalysis of organic compounds, and his research group has developed nanoparticle-based systems using tethered enzymes for simultaneous sensing and decontamination of organophosphorus toxins. In addition to designing in vivo drug delivery systems, including materials for simultaneous diagnosis and treatment of disease, his interests in biomedicine include fundamental studies on the adsorption and exchange of proteins at nanoparticle surfaces in biological media

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is more than two decades since the first nanomedicines were released on the market. During this time, a wide range of materials and compositions have been tested, mostly at the preclinical stage. The focus of these studies has been to address key clinical goals, such as the early diagnosis of degenerative diseases and the selective treatment of target cells or tissues. Currently, a new generation of imaging agents and nanomaterial-based pharmaceuticals are being developed, with improved biocompatibility, pharmacokinetics, and diagnostic and therapeutic efficacies. Once bioavailability limitations and regulatory matters concerning their somewhat complex compositions are addressed, rapid commercialization of these products is expected.

In this context, this Special Issue focuses on the development of novel nanoplatforms with applications in bioimaging (e.g., MRI, PET, HIFU), and/or suitable to promote selective therapies (then, minimizing side effects) through targeted delivery and specific intracellular drug release mechanisms. Manuscripts at both the preclinical and clinical levels are encouraged.

Prof. Pablo Botella
Prof. Christopher C. Landry
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomedicine
  • bioimaging
  • selective therapy
  • targeted delivery
  • theranostics
  • stimuli-responsive
  • intracellular release

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of the Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress Response of CeO2-RGO Nanocomposites in Human Lung Epithelial A549 Cells
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1709; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121709 - 29 Nov 2019
Abstract
Graphene-based nanocomposites have attracted enormous interest in nanomedicine and environmental remediation, owing to their unique characteristics. The increased production and widespread application of these nanocomposites might raise concern about their adverse health effects. In this study, for the first time, we examine the [...] Read more.
Graphene-based nanocomposites have attracted enormous interest in nanomedicine and environmental remediation, owing to their unique characteristics. The increased production and widespread application of these nanocomposites might raise concern about their adverse health effects. In this study, for the first time, we examine the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress response of a relatively new nanocomposite of cerium oxide-reduced graphene oxide (CeO2-RGO) in human lung epithelial (A549) cells. CeO2-RGO nanocomposites and RGO were prepared by a simple hydrothermal method and characterized by relevant analytical techniques. Cytotoxicity data have shown that RGO significantly induces toxicity in A549 cells, evident by cell viability reduction, membrane damage, cell cycle arrest, and mitochondrial membrane potential loss. However, CeO2-RGO nanocomposites did not cause statistically significant toxicity as compared to a control. We further observed that RGO significantly induces reactive oxygen species generation and reduces glutathione levels. However, CeO2-RGO nanocomposites did not induce oxidative stress in A549 cells. Interestingly, we observed that CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs) alone significantly increase glutathione (GSH) levels in A549 cells as compared to a control. The GSH replenishing potential of CeO2 nanoparticles could be one of the possible reasons for the biocompatible nature of CeO2-RGO nanocomposites. Our data warrant further and more advanced research to explore the biocompatibility/safety mechanisms of CeO2-RGO nanocomposites in different cell lines and animal models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Nanomaterials for Clinical Imaging and Selective Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle
Development of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Polyacrylic Acid and Aluminum Hydroxide as an Efficient Contrast Agent for Multimodal Imaging
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1626; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111626 - 15 Nov 2019
Abstract
Early diagnosis of disease and follow-up of therapy is of vital importance for appropriate patient management since it allows rapid treatment, thereby reducing mortality and improving health and quality of life with lower expenditure for health care systems. New approaches include nanomedicine-based diagnosis [...] Read more.
Early diagnosis of disease and follow-up of therapy is of vital importance for appropriate patient management since it allows rapid treatment, thereby reducing mortality and improving health and quality of life with lower expenditure for health care systems. New approaches include nanomedicine-based diagnosis combined with therapy. Nanoparticles (NPs), as contrast agents for in vivo diagnosis, have the advantage of combining several imaging agents that are visible using different modalities, thereby achieving high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, high specificity, morphological, and functional information. In this work, we present the development of aluminum hydroxide nanostructures embedded with polyacrylic acid (PAA) coated iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles, Fe3O4@Al(OH)3, synthesized by a two-step co-precipitation and forced hydrolysis method, their physicochemical characterization and first biomedical studies as dual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/positron emission tomography (PET) contrast agents for cell imaging. The so-prepared NPs are size-controlled, with diameters below 250 nm, completely and homogeneously coated with an Al(OH)3 phase over the magnetite cores, superparamagnetic with high saturation magnetization value (Ms = 63 emu/g-Fe3O4), and porous at the surface with a chemical affinity for fluoride ion adsorption. The suitability as MRI and PET contrast agents was tested showing high transversal relaxivity (r2) (83.6 mM−1 s−1) and rapid uptake of 18F-labeled fluoride ions as a PET tracer. The loading stability with 18F-fluoride was tested in longitudinal experiments using water, buffer, and cell culture media. Even though the stability of the 18F-label varied, it remained stable under all conditions. A first in vivo experiment indicates the suitability of Fe3O4@Al(OH)3 nanoparticles as a dual contrast agent for sensitive short-term (PET) and high-resolution long-term imaging (MRI). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Nanomaterials for Clinical Imaging and Selective Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle
Interaction of Immune Cells and Tumor Cells in Gold Nanorod–Gelatin Composite Porous Scaffolds
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1367; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101367 - 24 Sep 2019
Abstract
Composite porous scaffolds prepared by immobilization of photothermal nano-agents into porous scaffold have been used for both cancer therapy and tissue regeneration. However, it is not clear how the host immune cells and ablated tumor cells interact and stimulate each other in the [...] Read more.
Composite porous scaffolds prepared by immobilization of photothermal nano-agents into porous scaffold have been used for both cancer therapy and tissue regeneration. However, it is not clear how the host immune cells and ablated tumor cells interact and stimulate each other in the composite scaffolds. In this research, a gold nanorod-incorporated gelatin composite scaffold with controlled spherical large pores and well interconnected small pores was fabricated by using ice particulates as a porogen. The composite porous scaffold was used for investigating the interaction between dendritic cells and photothermally ablated breast tumor cells. The composite scaffold demonstrated excellent photothermal property and the temperature change value could be adjusted by irradiation time and laser power density. The composite scaffold showed excellent photothermal ablation ability towards breast tumor cells. The photothermally ablated tumor cells induced activation of dendritic cells when immature dendritic cells were co-cultured in the composite scaffold. Consequently, the gold nanorod–incorporated gelatin composite porous scaffold should provide a useful platform for simultaneous photothermal-immune ablation of breast tumor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Nanomaterials for Clinical Imaging and Selective Therapy)
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