Special Issue "Functionalized Nanomaterials for Bioelectronic and Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Wamadeva Balachandran
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Systems Engineering, Brunel University London, Brunel Innovation Centre, Uxbridge, UK
Interests: guided wave measurement; electromagnetic acoustic transducers; Lab-on-a-chip; electromagnetic field sensing; global positioning satellite system and MEMS
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ruth MacKay
Website
Guest Editor
Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, CEDPS, Brunel University London, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, UK

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

NanoBioTechnology is an exceptionally diverse, multidisciplinary field uncovering new knowledge and creating innovative technologies at the interface of nanoscience, engineering, and medicine. This Special Issue will aim to highlight the global research efforts that have been focused on the development of molecular and biomolecular electronic and optical systems, aiming to establish fundamental principles for the construction of optical and electronic sensors and biosensors. These scientific activities represent a leading interdisciplinary effort to bridge chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. The focus of the articles in this issue will demonstrate how collaborative environment encourages engineers, scientist, and clinicians to pioneer new ways to solve some of the most complex challenges in healthcare and the environment. This Special Issue welcomes all submissions from studies related to functional nanomaterials used in sustainable environment, bioelectronics and personalised medical applications.

Prof. Wamadeva Balachandran
Dr. Ruth MacKay
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • POCT
  • Precision medicine
  • NEMS
  • Bioelectronics
  • Optoelectronics
  • Infectious diseases
  • Graphene sensors
  • Biomolecule-sensing using functionalised nanoparticles

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Label-Free Electrochemical Aptasensor for Sensitive Detection of Malachite Green Based on Au Nanoparticle/Graphene Quantum Dots/Tungsten Disulfide Nanocomposites
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020229 - 08 Feb 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
A label-free electrochemical aptasensor was fabricated to sensitively determine malachite green (MG) based on Au nanoparticles/graphene quantum dots-tungsten disulfide nanosheet composite film modified glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs/GQDs-WS2/GCE). A facial strategy for the self-assembly of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) on tungsten disulfide [...] Read more.
A label-free electrochemical aptasensor was fabricated to sensitively determine malachite green (MG) based on Au nanoparticles/graphene quantum dots-tungsten disulfide nanosheet composite film modified glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs/GQDs-WS2/GCE). A facial strategy for the self-assembly of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) on tungsten disulfide nanosheets (WS2) was developed to fabricate 0D/2D nanocomposites. As-prepared GQDs-WS2 hybrids exhibited significantly enhanced electrocatalytic properties, and were first used as electroactive materials to construct electrochemical aptasensor. The AuNPs/GQDs-WS2/GCE was prepared through depositing Au nanoparticles on the surface of the GQDs-WS2 film, which acted as the electrochemical sensing matrix to covalently immobilize the aptamers of MG via the Au–S bond. In this label-free proposal, the aptasensor was applied to detect MG by monitoring voltammetric signal resulted from electrochemical oxidation of the MG captured by the aptamer. Under the optimized conditions, the aptasensor showed a wide linear range from 0.01 to 10 μM for MG detection with a low detection limit of 3.38 nM (S/N = 3). The method was applied to determination of MG in spiked fish samples and gave satisfactory results. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
First Generation Amperometric Biosensing of Galactose with Xerogel-Carbon Nanotube Layer-By-Layer Assemblies
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010042 - 29 Dec 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
A first-generation amperometric galactose biosensor has been systematically developed utilizing layer-by-layer (LbL) construction of xerogels, polymers, and carbon nanotubes toward a greater fundamental understanding of sensor design with these materials and the potential development of a more efficient galactosemia diagnostic tool for clinical [...] Read more.
A first-generation amperometric galactose biosensor has been systematically developed utilizing layer-by-layer (LbL) construction of xerogels, polymers, and carbon nanotubes toward a greater fundamental understanding of sensor design with these materials and the potential development of a more efficient galactosemia diagnostic tool for clinical application. The effect of several parameters (xerogel silane precursor, buffer pH, enzyme concentration, drying time and the inclusion of a polyurethane (PU) outer layer) on galactose sensitivity were investigated with the critical nature of xerogel selection being demonstrated. Xerogels formed from silanes with medium, aliphatic side chains were shown to exhibit significant enhancements in sensitivity with the addition of PU due to decreased enzyme leaching. Semi-permeable membranes of diaminobenzene and resorcinol copolymer and Nafion were used for selective discrimination against interferent species and the accompanying loss of sensitivity with adding layers was countered using functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Optimized sensor performance included effective galactose sensitivity (0.037 μA/mM) across a useful diagnostic concentration range (0.5 mM to 7 mM), fast response time (~30 s), and low limits of detection (~80 μM) comparable to literature reports on galactose sensors. Additional modification with anionic polymer layers and/or nanoparticles allowed for galactose detection in blood serum samples and additional selectivity effectiveness. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Deposition of Gold Nanoparticles on Reduced Graphene Oxide by Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry for the Sensitive Determination of As(III)
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010041 - 29 Dec 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
In this study, a stable, sensitive electrochemical sensor was fabricated by the electrochemical codeposition of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and gold nanoparticles on a glassy carbon electrode (rGO-Aunano/GCE) using cyclic voltammetry (CV), which enabled a simple and controllable electrode modification strategy [...] Read more.
In this study, a stable, sensitive electrochemical sensor was fabricated by the electrochemical codeposition of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and gold nanoparticles on a glassy carbon electrode (rGO-Aunano/GCE) using cyclic voltammetry (CV), which enabled a simple and controllable electrode modification strategy for the determination of trace As(III) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). SWASV, CV, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the electrochemical properties and morphology of the proposed sensing platform. The number of sweep segments, the deposition potential and the deposition time were optimized to obtain ideal sensitivity. The presence of rGO from the electroreduction of graphene oxide on the sensing interface effectively enlarged the specific surface area and consequently improved the preconcentration capacity for As(III). The rGO-Aunano/GCE sensor exhibited outstanding detection performance for As(III) due to the combined effect of Aunano and rGO formed during the electroreduction process. Under the optimized conditions, a linear range from 13.375 × 10−9 to 668.75 × 10−9 mol/L (1.0 to 50.0 μg/L) was obtained with a detection limit of 1.07 × 10−9 mol/L (0.08 μg/L) (S/N = 3). The reproducibility and reliability of the rGO-Aunano/GCE sensor were also verified by performing 8 repetitive measurements. Finally, the rGO-Aunano/GCE sensor was used for the analysis of real samples with satisfactory results. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Progress in Metal–Organic Framework (MOF) Based Luminescent Chemodosimeters
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 974; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9070974 - 03 Jul 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), as a class of crystalline hybrid architectures, consist of metal ions and organic ligands and have displayed great potential in luminescent sensing applications due to their tunable structures and unique photophysical properties. Until now, many studies have been reported on [...] Read more.
Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), as a class of crystalline hybrid architectures, consist of metal ions and organic ligands and have displayed great potential in luminescent sensing applications due to their tunable structures and unique photophysical properties. Until now, many studies have been reported on the development of MOF-based luminescent sensors, which can be classified into two major categories: MOF chemosensors based on reversible host–guest interactions and MOF chemodosimeters based on the irreversible reactions between targets with a probe. In this review, we summarize the recently developed luminescent MOF-based chemodosimeters for various analytes, including H2S, HClO, biothiols, fluoride ions, redox-active biomolecules, Hg2+, and CN. In addition, some remaining challenges and future perspectives in this area are also discussed. Full article
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