Special Issue "Luminescent Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Josefa Isasi Marín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Interests: nanotechnology; synthesis; structural and morphological characterization; luminescence; superparamagnetism; Applications in visualization systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, luminescent materials have been considered important components from a technological point of view, that are necessary for the functionality and success of many lighting and visualization systems. Their applications depend on the luminescent emission of the lanthanide ions: sharp lines, high efficiency and high lumen equivalence.

In the field of luminescent materials, the research in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology is enabling the synthesis, study, and use of luminescent materials that allow a reduction in global energy consumption and a multitude of new functionalities that can lead to multiple applications. In fact, the three main benefits of solid-state lighting technology are summarized as follows: (i) the inherent ability to generate light with high efficiency resulting in considerable energy savings; (ii) durability, generating potentially huge environmental benefits; and (iii) control of emission intensity with much greater precision, allowing it to be customized for specific applications.

In another area, modern medicine (early diagnosis of cancer and cardiovascular diseases) requires investigations focused on the synthesis of luminescent nanoparticles by employing as cell visualization systems that overcome the limitations of the use of techniques: high cost, low resolution, and the use of ionizing radiation or low speed of image acquisition. Although, the development of this research is still ongoing, it is still in its infancy, since some technological challenges are associated with certain evaluated parameters have not been resolved yet.

As such, I invite researchers working on the synthesis, characterization and study of luminescent materials to submit original research articles, as well as review articles, to this Special Issue, in order to provide the readers of luminescent nanomaterials with an updated perspective on the current state of affairs. Research may include any aspect related to solid-state lighting technologies or the use of luminescent nanoparticles in the field of biology and modern medicine.

Dr. Josefa Isasi Marín
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Luminescent nanomaterials
  • Luminescent nanoparticles
  • Nanophosphors
  • Advanced processing
  • Cellular display systems
  • Solid-state lighting

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Towards Multi-Functional SiO2@YAG:Ce Core–Shell Optical Nanoparticles for Solid State Lighting Applications
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010153 - 16 Jan 2020
Abstract
This paper aims to investigate the synthesis, structure, and optical properties of SiO2@YAG:Ce core–shell optical nanoparticles for solid state lighting applications. YAG:Ce phosphor is a key part in white light emitting diodes (LEDs), with its main functionality being the generation of [...] Read more.
This paper aims to investigate the synthesis, structure, and optical properties of SiO2@YAG:Ce core–shell optical nanoparticles for solid state lighting applications. YAG:Ce phosphor is a key part in white light emitting diodes (LEDs), with its main functionality being the generation of yellow light. Generated yellow light from phosphor will be combined with blue light, emitted from chip, resulting in the generation of white light. Generated light in LEDs will often be scattered by SiO2 nanoparticles. SiO2 nanoparticles are often distributed within the optical window, aiming for a more homogeneous light output. The main idea in this research is to combine these functionalities in one core–shell particle, with its core being SiO2 and its shell being phosphor. In this study core–shell nanoparticles with different Ce3+ concentrations were synthesized by a sol–gel method. Synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis, high resolution transmission electron macroscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Luminescence characteristics of SiO2@YAG:Ce core–shell particles were compared with that of SiO2/YAG:Ce mixture composite, which is now used in commercial LEDs. Obtained results showed that core–shell nanoparticles have comparatively much better optical properties, compared to SiO2/YAG:Ce mixture composite and can therefore be potentially used in LEDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Luminescent Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Facile Synthesis of Mn4+-Activated Double Perovskite Germanate Phosphors with Near-Infrared Persistent Luminescence
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1759; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121759 - 11 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Tetravalent manganese doped phosphors are emerging as a new class of efficient near-infrared emitters for applications in a variety of areas, such as bioimaging and night-vision surveillance. Novel double perovskite-type La2MgGeO6:Mn4+ phosphors were successfully prepared using a microwave-assisted [...] Read more.
Tetravalent manganese doped phosphors are emerging as a new class of efficient near-infrared emitters for applications in a variety of areas, such as bioimaging and night-vision surveillance. Novel double perovskite-type La2MgGeO6:Mn4+ phosphors were successfully prepared using a microwave-assisted energy-saving solid state method. This simple technique involving the use of a microwave susceptor allows for a reduction of the preparation time compared to a conventional solid state reaction. The samples were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, as well as energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, photoluminescence excitation/emission spectroscopy, persistent luminescence decay and temperature-dependent photoluminescence analysis. Substitution between isovalent Mn4+ and Ge4+ can be achieved without additional charge compensators in this germanate-based phosphor, which provides strong emission in the near-infrared spectral region, assigned to the characteristic transitions of tetravalent manganese ions. Additionally, the double perovskite-type germanate phosphor exhibits excellent luminescence thermal stability. Moreover, the spectroscopic properties, excitation wavelength-dependent and temperature-dependent persistent luminescence were studied. A series of thermoluminescence measurements were presented trying to give clear information on the charging process, afterglow behavior and the nature of the traps responsible for the persistent luminescence. The present investigation expands the range of available promising near-infrared emitting persistent phosphors for medical imaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Luminescent Nanomaterials)
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