Special Issue "Electronics, Electromagnetism and Applications of Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Anna Vilà
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electronic and Biomedical Engineering, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: electronic materials and devices; nanoscience; nanotechnology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

As far as we know, the applications of nanomaterials are limitless and offer the possibility to generate significant advances in fields such as computing, electronics, food, medicine, etc. The variety of nanomaterials is huge, and their combination allows to tailor the properties of functional materials to develop novel devices and applications.

In particular, electronics in nanomaterials is one of the scientific disciplines at the forefront of the fast-emerging fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Nanoelectronics holds answers for how the capabilities of electronic devices can be increased while reducing their weight and consumption. Additionally, the possibility of eternally shrinking integrated circuits, wearing flexible gadgets, spreading internet-of-things everywhere, etc. is becoming a reality thanks to nanotechnology.

Similarly, very interesting magnetic behaviors can be produced in materials thanks to the nanometric dimensions of the systems or of the crystallites forming them. Potential applications in nonreciprocal systems, magnetic recording, high-performance soft materials and magnets, microsensors and microactuators, functionalized magnetic particles, etc. are being revolutionized by developoments in nanomagnetism.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims to explore the applications of nanomaterials, including the fields of electronics, magnetism, spintronics, etc.

Prof. Dr. Anna Vila
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • avalanche photodetectors
  • electronic devices
  • electronic materials
  • metal–oxide semiconductors
  • nanotechnology
  • printed electronics

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Multi-Components on the Microwave Absorption and Dielectric Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Carbon Nanotube/Y2O3/ZrB2 Ceramics
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(10), 2640; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11102640 - 07 Oct 2021
Viewed by 262
Abstract
Carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced Y2O3/ZrB2 ceramics were fabricated via planetary ball milling and atmospheric-pressure plasma spraying for the first time. The phase composition, micromorphology, and electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption performance of the Y2O3/ZrB2/CNT [...] Read more.
Carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced Y2O3/ZrB2 ceramics were fabricated via planetary ball milling and atmospheric-pressure plasma spraying for the first time. The phase composition, micromorphology, and electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption performance of the Y2O3/ZrB2/CNT hybrid was investigated from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. Both the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity were enhanced as the ZrB2 and CNT content increased. The Y2O3/ZrB2/CNT hybrids corresponded to a ZrB2 content of 15 wt.%, and the CNT content was 2 wt.% and showed an exceptional EM wave absorption capability, with a minimum reflection loss of −25.7 dB at 1.9 mm thickness, and the effective absorption band was in a full X-band. These results indicate that an appropriate CNT or ZrB2 content can tune the complex permittivity and absorption performance of the Y2O3/ZrB2/CNT ceramics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronics, Electromagnetism and Applications of Nanomaterials)
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Article
Substrate-Induced Strain Effect on Structural and Magnetic Properties of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 Films
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(3), 781; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030781 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 443
Abstract
We present a detailed study about the substrate-induced strain and thickness effects on the structure and magnetic properties of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 films. The in-plane tensile or compressive strain imposed by four different substrates configures an in-plane or out-of-plane easy [...] Read more.
We present a detailed study about the substrate-induced strain and thickness effects on the structure and magnetic properties of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 films. The in-plane tensile or compressive strain imposed by four different substrates configures an in-plane or out-of-plane easy axis, respectively. The presence of a soft magnetic phase at the interface is also conditioned by the type of strain. The obtained results are discussed in terms of the different anisotropies that participate and control the final magnetic behavior. The relevance of these results lies in the feasibility of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 in memory applications and spintronic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronics, Electromagnetism and Applications of Nanomaterials)
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Article
Seawater Absorption and Adhesion Properties of Hydrophobic and Superhydrophobic Thermoset Epoxy Nanocomposite Coatings
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 272; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020272 - 21 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 540
Abstract
The enhancement of both thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy materials using nanomaterials becomes a target in coating of the steel to protect it from aggressive environmental conditions for a long time, with reducing the cost. In this respect, the adhesion properties of [...] Read more.
The enhancement of both thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy materials using nanomaterials becomes a target in coating of the steel to protect it from aggressive environmental conditions for a long time, with reducing the cost. In this respect, the adhesion properties of the epoxy with the steel surfaces, and its proper superhyrophobicity to repel the seawater humidity, can be optimized via addition of green nanoparticles (NPs). In-situ modification of silver (Ag) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) NPs with oleic acid (OA) was carried out during the formation of Ag−OA and CaCO3−OA, respectively. The epoxide oleic acid (EOA) was also used as capping for Ca−O3 NPs by in-situ method and epoxidation of Ag−OA NPs, too. The morphology, thermal stability, and the diameters of NPs, as well as their dispersion in organic solvent, were investigated. The effects of the prepared NPs on the exothermic curing of the epoxy resins in the presence of polyamines, flexibility or rigidity of epoxy coatings, wettability, and coatings durability in aggressive seawater environment were studied. The obtained results confirmed that the proper superhyrophobicity, coating adhesion, and thermal stability of the epoxy were improved after exposure to salt spray fog for 2000 h at 36 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronics, Electromagnetism and Applications of Nanomaterials)
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Article
Self-Rectifying Resistive Switching and Short-Term Memory Characteristics in Pt/HfO2/TaOx/TiN Artificial Synaptic Device
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(11), 2159; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10112159 - 29 Oct 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 998
Abstract
Here, we propose a Pt/HfO2/TaOx/TiN artificial synaptic device that is an excellent candidate for artificial synapses. First, XPS analysis is conducted to provide the dielectric (HfO2/TaOx/TiN) information deposited by DC sputtering and atomic layer deposition [...] Read more.
Here, we propose a Pt/HfO2/TaOx/TiN artificial synaptic device that is an excellent candidate for artificial synapses. First, XPS analysis is conducted to provide the dielectric (HfO2/TaOx/TiN) information deposited by DC sputtering and atomic layer deposition (ALD). The self-rectifying resistive switching characteristics are achieved by the asymmetric device stack, which is an advantage of the current suppression in the crossbar array structure. The results show that the programmed data are lost over time and that the decay rate, which is verified from the retention test, can be adjusted by controlling the compliance current (CC). Based on these properties, we emulate bio-synaptic characteristics, such as short-term plasticity (STP), long-term plasticity (LTP), and paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), in the self-rectifying I–V characteristics of the Pt/HfO2/TaOx/TiN bilayer memristor device. The PPF characteristics are mimicked by replacing the bio-stimulation with the interval time of paired pulse inputs. The typical potentiation and depression are also implemented by optimizing the set and reset pulse. Finally, we demonstrate the natural depression by varying the interval time between pulse inputs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronics, Electromagnetism and Applications of Nanomaterials)
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Article
Investigating a Lock-In Thermal Imaging Setup for the Detection and Characterization of Magnetic Nanoparticles
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(9), 1665; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10091665 - 25 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 904
Abstract
Magnetic hyperthermia treatments utilize the heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles stimulated by an alternating magnetic field. Therefore, analytical methods are required to precisely characterize the dissipated thermal energy and to evaluate potential amplifying or diminishing factors in order to ensure optimal treatment conditions. [...] Read more.
Magnetic hyperthermia treatments utilize the heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles stimulated by an alternating magnetic field. Therefore, analytical methods are required to precisely characterize the dissipated thermal energy and to evaluate potential amplifying or diminishing factors in order to ensure optimal treatment conditions. Here, we present a lock-in thermal imaging setup specifically designed to thermally measure magnetic nanoparticles and we investigate theoretically how the various experimental parameters may influence the measurement. We compare two detection methods and highlight how an affordable microbolometer can achieve identical sensitivity with respect to a thermal camera-based system by adapting the measurement time. Furthermore, a numerical model is used to demonstrate the optimal stimulation frequency, the degree of nanomaterial heating power, preferential sample holder dimensions and the extent of heat losses to the environment. Using this model, we also revisit some technical assumptions and experimental results that previous studies have stated and suggest an optimal experimental configuration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronics, Electromagnetism and Applications of Nanomaterials)
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Article
Molecular Adsorption of NH3 and NO2 on Zr and Hf Dichalcogenides (S, Se, Te) Monolayers: A Density Functional Theory Study
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1215; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061215 - 22 Jun 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1165
Abstract
Due to their atomic thicknesses and semiconducting properties, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are gaining increasing research interest. Among them, Hf- and Zr-based TMDCs demonstrate the unique advantage that their oxides (HfO2 and ZrO2) are excellent dielectric materials. One possible [...] Read more.
Due to their atomic thicknesses and semiconducting properties, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are gaining increasing research interest. Among them, Hf- and Zr-based TMDCs demonstrate the unique advantage that their oxides (HfO2 and ZrO2) are excellent dielectric materials. One possible method to precisely tune the material properties of two-dimensional atomically thin nanomaterials is to adsorb molecules on their surfaces as non-bonded dopants. In the present work, the molecular adsorption of NO2 and NH3 on the two-dimensional trigonal prismatic (1H) and octahedral (1T) phases of Hf and Zr dichalcogenides (S, Se, Te) is studied using dispersion-corrected periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The adsorption configuration, energy, and charge-transfer properties during molecular adsorption are investigated. In addition, the effects of the molecular dopants (NH3 and NO2) on the electronic structure of the materials are studied. It was observed that the adsorbed NH3 donates electrons to the conduction band of the Hf (Zr) dichalcogenides, while NO2 receives electrons from the valance band. Furthermore, the NO2 dopant affects than NH3 significantly. The resulting band structure of the molecularly doped Zr and Hf dichalcogenides are modulated by the molecular adsorbates. This study explores, not only the properties of the two-dimensional 1H and 1T phases of Hf and Zr dichalcogenides (S, Se, Te), but also tunes their electronic properties by adsorbing non-bonded dopants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronics, Electromagnetism and Applications of Nanomaterials)
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Article
Design and Simulation of a Multi-Sheet Beam Terahertz Radiation Source Based on Carbon-Nanotube Cold Cathode
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1768; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121768 - 12 Dec 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1295
Abstract
Carbon nanotube (CNT) cold cathodes are proving to be compelling candidates for miniaturized terahertz (THz) vacuum electronic devices (VEDs) owning to their superior field-emission (FE) characteristics. Here, we report on the development of a multi-sheet beam CNT cold cathode electron optical system with [...] Read more.
Carbon nanotube (CNT) cold cathodes are proving to be compelling candidates for miniaturized terahertz (THz) vacuum electronic devices (VEDs) owning to their superior field-emission (FE) characteristics. Here, we report on the development of a multi-sheet beam CNT cold cathode electron optical system with concurrently high beam current and high current density. The microscopic FE characteristics of the CNT film emitter is captured through the development of an empirically derived macroscopic simulation model which is used to provide representative emission performance. Through parametrically optimized macroscale simulations, a five-sheet-beam triode electron gun has been designed, and has been shown to emit up to 95 mA at 3.2 kV. Through careful engineering of the electron gun geometric parameters, a low-voltage compact THz radiation source operating in high-order TM 5 , 1 mode is investigated to improve output power and suppress mode competition. Particle in cell (PIC) simulations show the average output power is 33 W at 0.1 THz, and the beam–wave interaction efficiency is approximately 10%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronics, Electromagnetism and Applications of Nanomaterials)
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