Advances in Nanomaterials 2023

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 December 2023) | Viewed by 5773

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physics “E.R. Caianiello”, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
Interests: optical and electrical properties of nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, and 2D materials; van der Waals heterostructures and Schottky junctions; field-effect transistors; non-volatile memories; solar cells; photodetectors; field emission devices
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Guest Editor
School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China
Interests: lanthanide; crystals and nanocrystals; nonlinear; biophotonics; solar cells
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue includes regular papers published in Nanomaterials in 2023, and selected papers from the 4th International Online Conference on Nanomaterials, held on 5–19 May 2023 on sciforum.net (https://iocn2023.sciforum.net/). The scope of this Special Issue is to cover the whole breadth of nanomaterials research and provide a forum for presenting and discussing new results. Contributors are requested to submit papers and presentations from the field of nanomaterials, such as nanomaterials and nanostructures, 2D materials and graphene, nanoparticles and quantum dots, nanowires and nanotubes, nanobiology and nanomedicine, nanophotonics and plasmonics, nanoelectronics and nanodevices, nanoenergy and nanocatalysis, nanofabrication, and nanomanipulation.

Papers will be subjected to peer review and published with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications. We hope this conference series will turn out to be recognized as a novel means to (electronically) present the most recent advances in the area of nanomaterials.

Prof. Dr. Antonio Di Bartolomeo
Prof. Dr. Guanying Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials and nanostructures
  • 2D materials and graphene
  • nanoparticles and quantum dots
  • nanowires and nanotubes
  • nanobiology and nanomedicine
  • nanophotonics and plasmonics
  • nanoelectronics and nanodevices
  • nanoenergy and nanocatalysis
  • nanofabrication and nanomanipulation
  • nanofluidics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 3439 KiB  
Article
Synthesis of Zinc Nanoparticles by the Gas Condensation Method in a Non-Contact Crucible and Their Physical–Chemical Characterization
by Artyom N. Markov, Alexander A. Kapinos, Anton N. Petukhov, Egor S. Dokin, Artem V. Emelyanov, Nataliia V. Abarbanel, Dmitriy M. Zarubin, Anna A. Golovacheva, Sergey S. Suvorov, Alexandra V. Barysheva, Pavel P. Grachev, Ilya V. Vorotyntsev and Andrey V. Vorotynstev
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(2), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14020163 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 828
Abstract
This work explored the zinc nanoparticles obtained by the one-stage induction flow levitation method. A 10 kW tube generator with an operating frequency of 440 kHz was used. The process used 8 mm diameter zinc granules (2 g weight) with a purity of [...] Read more.
This work explored the zinc nanoparticles obtained by the one-stage induction flow levitation method. A 10 kW tube generator with an operating frequency of 440 kHz was used. The process used 8 mm diameter zinc granules (2 g weight) with a purity of 99.9%. Zinc wire was fed to replace the evaporated metal from the granule surface. This method productivity was 30 g/h of nanoparticles. In addition, various methods were used to characterize the resulting nanoparticles: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-Ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), dynamic light scattering (DLS), porosimetry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The resulting nanoparticle size, determined by SEM and porosimetry, was 350 nm, while the size of the primary crystallites was 21 nm. The amount of impurities in the resulting nanoparticles did not exceed 1000 ppm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomaterials 2023)
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18 pages, 15150 KiB  
Article
Design and Characterization of pMyc/pMax Peptide-Coupled Gold Nanosystems for Targeting Myc in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines
by Samuel Longoria-García, Celia N. Sánchez-Domínguez, Margarita Sánchez-Domínguez, Jesús R. Delgado-Balderas, José F. Islas-Cisneros, Oscar Vidal-Gutiérrez and Hugo L. Gallardo-Blanco
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(20), 2802; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13202802 - 21 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1132
Abstract
Myc and Max are essential proteins in the development of prostate cancer. They act by dimerizing and binding to E-box sequences. Disrupting the Myc:Max heterodimer interaction or its binding to E-box sequences to interrupt gene transcription represent promising strategies for treating cancer. We [...] Read more.
Myc and Max are essential proteins in the development of prostate cancer. They act by dimerizing and binding to E-box sequences. Disrupting the Myc:Max heterodimer interaction or its binding to E-box sequences to interrupt gene transcription represent promising strategies for treating cancer. We designed novel pMyc and pMax peptides from reference sequences, and we evaluated their ability to bind specifically to E-box sequences using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Then, we assembled nanosystems (NSs) by coupling pMyc and pMax peptides to AuNPs, and determined peptide conjugation using UV-Vis spectroscopy. After that, we characterized the NS to obtain the nanoparticle’s size, hydrodynamic diameter, and zeta potential. Finally, we evaluated hemocompatibility and cytotoxic effects in three different prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines (LNCaP, PC-3, and DU145) and a non-cancerous cell line (Vero CCL-81). EMSA results suggests peptide–nucleic acid interactions between the pMyc:pMax dimer and the E-box. The hemolysis test showed little hemolytic activity for the NS at the concentrations (5, 0.5, and 0.05 ng/µL) we evaluated. Cell viability assays showed NS cytotoxicity. Overall, results suggest that the NS with pMyc and pMax peptides might be suitable for further research regarding Myc-driven prostate adenocarcinomas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomaterials 2023)
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23 pages, 6507 KiB  
Article
Characterization and Comparison of WO3/WO3-MoO3 and TiO2/TiO2-ZnO Nanostructures for Photoelectrocatalytic Degradation of the Pesticide Imazalil
by Mireia Cifre-Herrando, Gemma Roselló-Márquez, Pedro José Navarro-Gázquez, María José Muñoz-Portero, Encarnación Blasco-Tamarit and José García-Antón
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(18), 2584; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13182584 - 18 Sep 2023
Viewed by 754
Abstract
Tungsten oxide (WO3) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are n-type semiconductors with numerous applications in photocatalysis. The objective of this study was to synthesize and characterize different types of nanostructures (WO3, WO3-Mo, TiO2, and TiO2 [...] Read more.
Tungsten oxide (WO3) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are n-type semiconductors with numerous applications in photocatalysis. The objective of this study was to synthesize and characterize different types of nanostructures (WO3, WO3-Mo, TiO2, and TiO2-ZnO) for a comparison of hybrid and pure nanostructures to use them as a photoanodes for photoelectrocatalytic degradation of emerging contaminants. With the aim of comparing the properties of both samples, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and confocal laser-Raman spectroscopy were used to study the morphology, composition, and crystallinity, respectively. Electrochemical impedances, Mott-Schottky, and water splitting measurements were performed to compare the photoelectrochemical properties of photoanodes. Finally, the photoelectrocatalytic degradation of the pesticide Imazalil was carried out with the best optimized nanostructure (TiO2-ZnO). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomaterials 2023)
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Review

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42 pages, 14393 KiB  
Review
Advances in the Fabrication of Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide and Its Applications to Sensors: A Review
by Chin-An Ku, Chung-Yu Yu, Chia-Wei Hung and Chen-Kuei Chung
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(21), 2853; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13212853 - 27 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1573
Abstract
Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is an important template for 1D nanomaterial synthesis. It is used as an etching template for nanopattern transfer in a variety of contexts, including nanostructured material synthesis, electrical sensors, optical sensors, photonic and electronic devices, photocatalysis, and hardness [...] Read more.
Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is an important template for 1D nanomaterial synthesis. It is used as an etching template for nanopattern transfer in a variety of contexts, including nanostructured material synthesis, electrical sensors, optical sensors, photonic and electronic devices, photocatalysis, and hardness and anticorrosion improvement. In this review, we focus on various fabrication methods, pore geometry modification, and recent advances of AAO, as well as sensor applications linked to our environment, daily life, and safety. Pore geometry is concerned with the material composition, applied voltage mold, electrolyte type, temperature, and anodizing time during the fabrication of AAOs and for adjusting their pore size and profile. The applied voltage can be divided into four types: direct current anodization (DCA), reverse pulse anodization, pulse anodization (PA), and hybrid pulse anodization (HPA). Conventional AAOs are fabricated using DCA and mild anodization (MA) at a relatively low temperature (−5~15 °C) to reduce the Joule heating effect. Moreover, the issues of costly high-purity aluminum and a long processing time can be improved using HPA to diminish the Joule heating effect at relatively high temperatures of 20–30 °C with cheap low-purity (≤99%) aluminum. The AAO-based sensors discussed here are primarily divided into electrical sensors and optical sensors; the performance of both sensors is affected by the sensing material and pore geometry. The electrical sensor is usually used for humidity or gas measurement applications and has a thin metal film on the surface as an electrode. On the contrary, the AAO optical sensor is a well-known sensor for detecting various substances with four kinds of mechanisms: interference, photoluminescence, surface plasma resonance, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Especially for SERS mechanisms, AAO can be used either as a solid support for coating metal nanoparticles or a template for depositing the metal content through the nanopores to form the nanodots or nanowires for detecting substances. High-performance sensors will play a crucial role in our living environments and promote our quality of life in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomaterials 2023)
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