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Natural and Synthetic Phenolic Compounds for Food Applications II

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 5637

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Cintia 4, I-80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: structural characterization, extraction, and evaluation/modulation of the antioxidant properties of natural phenolic compounds; exploitation of phenolic compounds, especially from agri-food by-products for the development of functional materials to be used in cosmetics, food packaging, and biomedicine; reactivity of natural phenolic compounds with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and their manipulation/derivatization to improve their functional properties; evaluation of the antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds and of complex extracts/matrices using validated chemical assays; chemistry of melanin pigments
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Based on their potent antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, natural phenolic compounds have gained increasing attention for their possible exploitation not only as food supplements but also in the food industry, e.g., as active components in food packaging for food stabilization.

This Special Issue is dedicated to natural and synthetic phenolic compounds endowed with antioxidant and other food stabilization-related properties for potential application in the food industry. Original research articles dealing with innovative applications of natural phenolic compounds as additives in smart food packaging or describing the modulation of the solubility and/or of the antioxidant and other food relevant properties of natural phenolic compounds to broaden their applications are also welcome, although safety aspects should be carefully considered in this latter case. In the case of plant-derived extracts, structural characterization and identification of the main active components is required. Attention will be devoted also to green and sustainable approaches for the recovery of antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds from natural sources as well as to bioprocessing and green chemistry solutions to improve their properties. Review articles describing the current state of the art are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Lucia Panzella
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • phenolic compounds
  • antioxidant
  • antimicrobial
  • food packaging
  • sustainability
  • green chemistry
  • bioprocessing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 1716 KiB  
Article
A Sustainable Approach for the Valorization of Underutilized Date Fruits
by Amel Hamdi, Isabel Viera-Alcaide, Susana Costa, Teresa Lino-Neto, Rafael Guillén-Bejarano, Rocío Rodríguez-Arcos and Ana Jiménez-Araujo
Molecules 2023, 28(15), 5807; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28155807 - 01 Aug 2023
Viewed by 939
Abstract
Secondary varieties of date fruits are often discarded because they do not have commercial value. However, their phytochemicals are very similar to those of the primary ones and therefore, they can be valorized as a source of compounds of interest, mainly phenols and [...] Read more.
Secondary varieties of date fruits are often discarded because they do not have commercial value. However, their phytochemicals are very similar to those of the primary ones and therefore, they can be valorized as a source of compounds of interest, mainly phenols and dietary fiber. Their chemical composition changes with ripening, so their characterization throughout this process is of great significance. Date fruit samples were harvested at Khalal, Rutab, and Tamer stages, and a mixture of fruits from ornamental date trees was also analyzed. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts were studied for their phenolic composition. In aqueous extracts, phenols decreased with ripening, while in the ethanolic ones having higher phenolic content. Chelidonic acid, a γ-pyrone, was the major compound found in all extracts, but in the ethanolic ones, flavonoids were also present in similar amounts. After purification by adsorption chromatography, all extracts were assayed for their antimicrobial activity. Those from the Tamer stage showed the highest activity, especially against Gram-positive bacteria. The fibrous residues after aqueous and ethanolic extractions were also characterized. Their chemical composition suggested that they can be considered as a good source of prebiotic arabinoxylans and antioxidant fiber, whose antiradical activity correlated with their phenolic content. Date fruits from secondary varieties are promising as a worthwhile starting point for obtaining new value-added products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural and Synthetic Phenolic Compounds for Food Applications II)
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11 pages, 1539 KiB  
Article
Effect of Liquefaction of Honey on the Content of Phenolic Compounds
by Tomáš Hájek
Molecules 2023, 28(2), 714; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28020714 - 11 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1510
Abstract
Thermal liquefaction at low temperature is very time consuming and microwaves or an ultrasonic bath can be used to accelerate the process of dissolving sugar crystals. Phenolic compounds, such as phenolic acids or flavonoids, are an important group of secondary metabolites of plants [...] Read more.
Thermal liquefaction at low temperature is very time consuming and microwaves or an ultrasonic bath can be used to accelerate the process of dissolving sugar crystals. Phenolic compounds, such as phenolic acids or flavonoids, are an important group of secondary metabolites of plants and become honey from the nectar of blossoms. In this study, how the content of phenolic acids and flavones in honey were affected by liquefaction of honey using a microwave oven was studied. The concentration of tested compounds in untreated honey and in honey liquefied in a hot water bath, ultrasonic bath and microwave oven at four microwave power levels were determined by reversed phase liquid chromatography combined with multichannel electrochemical detection. A significant decrease in the content of all compounds was observed for all melting treatments. The phenolic compounds concentration decreased on average by 31.1–35.5% using microwave at intensities 270, 450 and 900 W and the time required for the sugar crystal melting was more than 20 times less than in the case of the 80 °C water bath. The temperature of samples after the end of microwave liquefaction was 76–89 °C. Significantly higher losses of phenolic compounds were observed during ultrasound treatment (48.5%), although the maximum temperature of honey was 45 °C, and at the lowest microwaves power (50.6%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural and Synthetic Phenolic Compounds for Food Applications II)
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Review

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24 pages, 1433 KiB  
Review
Structural, Binding and Functional Properties of Milk Protein-Polyphenol Systems: A Review
by Tessa M. van de Langerijt, James A. O’Mahony and Shane V. Crowley
Molecules 2023, 28(5), 2288; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28052288 - 01 Mar 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2587
Abstract
Polyphenols (PP) are linked to health benefits (e.g., prevention of cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity), which are mainly attributed to their antioxidant activity. During digestion, PP are oxidised to a significant degree reducing their bio-functionality. In recent years, the potential of various milk [...] Read more.
Polyphenols (PP) are linked to health benefits (e.g., prevention of cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity), which are mainly attributed to their antioxidant activity. During digestion, PP are oxidised to a significant degree reducing their bio-functionality. In recent years, the potential of various milk protein systems, including β-casein micelles, β-lactoglobulin aggregates, blood serum albumin aggregates, native casein micelles and re-assembled casein micelles, to bind and protect PP have been investigated. These studies have yet to be systematically reviewed. The functional properties of the milk protein-PP systems depend on the type and concentration of both PP and protein, as well as the structure of the resultant complexes, with environmental and processing factors also having an influence. Milk protein systems protect PP from degradation during digestion, resulting in a higher bioaccessibility and bioavailability, which improve the functional properties of PP upon consumption. This review compares different milk protein systems in terms of physicochemical properties, PP binding performance and ability to enhance the bio-functional properties of PP. The goal is to provide a comprehensive overview on the structural, binding, and functional properties of milk protein-polyphenol systems. It is concluded that milk protein complexes function effectively as delivery systems for PP, protecting PP from oxidation during digestion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural and Synthetic Phenolic Compounds for Food Applications II)
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