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Special Issue "Metabolomics in Food Authentication: Strategies and Applications"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Nikolaos S. Thomaidis
Website
Guest Editor
Department: Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Interests: food authenticity; high-resolution mass spectrometry; non-target screening; suspect screening; liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry; food contaminants; environmental analytical chemistry; emerging pollutants; transformation products; aquatic environment; wastewater treatment; biomonitoring
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Marilena Dasenaki
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Interests: food analysis; food quality control; food authenticity; high resolution mass spectrometry; analytical method development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food authentication is of interest for a large number of individuals and organizations, including the scientific community, law enforcement, food producers, importers and exporters, and consumers. This field is in a phase of exponential growth and is attracting a high level of attention from authorities and media around the world. Fraudulent acts, such as adulteration with cheaper ingredients and false claims of origin (geographical or varietal), reduce the quality of the products, mislead the consumer, and may even imply a health risk. Thus, food authenticity is a major concern for all involved in the food trade: consumers, consumer protection authorities, and also producers and dealers.

In the last few years, a universal analytical approach called “metabolomics” has experienced a significant increase in interest in food fingerprinting studies. Metabolomics focuses on the study of low molecular weight molecules (<1000 Da) and is used to explore and characterize food constituents, generating a detailed and comprehensive metabolic chemical profile of food. Metabolomic studies mainly involve the detection of metabolites (biomarkers) that can discriminate between sample populations (discriminative metabolomics) and/or the generation of statistical models that are able to classify samples and predict class memberships (predictive metabolomics). Metabolomics approaches can be also classified as non-targeted or targeted analysis; non-targeted approaches look for maximum coverage of metabolites that can be simultaneously identified in a particular food, while targeted approaches are based on the determination and identification of a certain type of metabolites that could belong to the either one or more chemical classes. In every case, as the complexity of the set of metabolites to be analyzed is quite high in both approaches, suitable analytical techniques and sample treatment methodologies are required.

In light of the numerous advances made in recent years on the above points, this Special Issue will extensively cover the topics of novel analytical techniques and metabolomics approaches for the assessment of food authenticity and quality. Scientists are warmly invited to submit their original contributions (reviews, original research papers, short communication) to this Special Issue, which will be of interest to a wide range of readers. In the cases of review articles, an additional brief (1–2 pages) description of the topic, including a draft index, is required. This preliminary step is essential to avoid overlapping of topics.

Prof. Dr. Nikolaos S. Thomaidis
Dr. Marilena Dasenaki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food authenticity
  • Food adulteration
  • Food quality
  • Analytical methods
  • Hyphenated techniques
  • High resolution mass spectrometry
  • Spectroscopic techniques
  • Isotope and elemental techniques
  • Chemical characterization of foods and beverages
  • Metabolic profiling
  • Metabolic fingerprinting
  • Advanced chemometric techniques

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Primary Metabolites in Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) Varieties Correlated with Antioxidant Activity and Taste Attributes by Metabolic Profiling
Molecules 2019, 24(23), 4282; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24234282 - 25 Nov 2019
Abstract
Brassica vegetables, such as cabbage, have many health benefits arising from their antioxidant and anticancer properties. These properties are endowed by the metabolite composition of the plant, and it is therefore important to elucidate the metabolic profile and associated activities in this genus. [...] Read more.
Brassica vegetables, such as cabbage, have many health benefits arising from their antioxidant and anticancer properties. These properties are endowed by the metabolite composition of the plant, and it is therefore important to elucidate the metabolic profile and associated activities in this genus. This study objectively evaluated the characteristics of cabbage varieties using metabolic profiling to identify the primary metabolic components that correlate with antioxidant activity and taste attributes. GC-MS analysis was used to identify the primary metabolites. Antioxidant activity was measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging assays, and an electronic tongue was used to quantitate nine taste attributes. Orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) using SIMCA 14 correlated the metabolite components with the taste and antioxidant characteristics. We identified 4-aminobutyric acid, fructose 1-phosphate, adipic acid, 5-oxoproline, N-acetylglycine, O-phosphoethanolamine, and homovanillic acid as important determinants of DPPH scavenging activity and umami, sourness, acidic bitterness, irritant and saltiness, bitterness, astringency, and richness, respectively. These metabolites represent markers indicating breed differences and contribute to differential cabbage functionality. These studies could be extended to measure additional metabolites, as well as to understand the role of growth conditions on the metabolic profile and health benefits of plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics in Food Authentication: Strategies and Applications)
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