molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Green Chemistry and Biomaterials"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Green Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Mr. Navid Rabiee
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran
Interests: nanomaterials; polymers; biomaterials; nanoparticle synthesis; cancer diagnostics; nanobiotechnology; nanoparticle preparation; pathogens
Prof. Dr. Rajender S. Varma
grade E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. ORD National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268, USA
2. Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Faculty of Science, Palacky University Olomouc, Šlechtitelů 11, 783 71 Olomouc, Czech Republic
Interests: organic chemistry; nanotechnology; synthetic organic chemistry; heterogeneous analysis; synthetic heterocyclic chemistry; nano-catalysis; microwave assisted organic synthesis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Michael R. Hamblin
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
Interests: photodynamic therapy (PDT); low-level light therapy (LLLT); wound healing and infectious disease; atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque; anti-tumor immunity; photochemical mechanisms
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Synthesis and the use of biomaterials with multiple functions can be a smart approach to treating diseases. The use of green synthesized nanomaterials with the aim of clinical, industrial, and societal purposes would be considered as the critical stages. In this regard, several therapeutics have been used in clinics and biomedical applications, but their side effects resulting from the synthesis procedure, solvents, additives and/or the condition of reactions including temperature and air gases, leads to serious problems. Therefore, the use of simple, cost-effective, environmentally friendly and tunable nanomaterials for biomedical applications including drug delivery, gene delivery, CRISPR/Cas9, biosensors, MRI contrast agents and other related uses would be a wise choice.

Mr. Navid Rabiee
Prof. Dr. Rajender S. Varma
Prof. Dr. Michael R. Hamblin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • green chemistry
  • nanomaterials
  • biomolecules
  • drug delivery
  • gene delivery
  • tissue engineering
  • CRISPR

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Synthesis of Novel Arginine-Based Flame Retardant and Its Application in Lyocell Fabric
Molecules 2021, 26(12), 3588; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26123588 - 11 Jun 2021
Viewed by 509
Abstract
Lyocell fabrics are widely applied in textiles, however, its high flammability increases the risk of fire. Therefore, to resolve the issue, a novel biomass-based flame retardant with phosphorus and nitrogen elements was designed and synthesized by the reaction of arginine with phosphoric acid [...] Read more.
Lyocell fabrics are widely applied in textiles, however, its high flammability increases the risk of fire. Therefore, to resolve the issue, a novel biomass-based flame retardant with phosphorus and nitrogen elements was designed and synthesized by the reaction of arginine with phosphoric acid and urea. It was then grafted onto the lyocell fabric by a dip-dry-cure technique to prepare durable flame-retardant lyocell fabric (FR-lyocell). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis demonstrated that the flame retardant was successfully introduced into the lyocell sample. Thermogravimetric (TG) and Raman analyses confirmed that the modified lyocell fabric featured excellent thermal stability and significantly increased char residue. Vertical combustion results indicated that FR-lyocell before and after washing formed a complete and dense char layer. Thermogravimetric Fourier-transform infrared (TG-FTIR) analysis suggested that incombustible substances (such as H2O and CO2) were produced and played a significant fire retarding role in the gas phase. The cone calorimeter test corroborated that the peak of heat release rate (PHRR) and total heat release (THR) declined by 89.4% and 56.4%, respectively. These results indicated that the flame retardancy of the lyocell fabric was observably ameliorated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Chemistry and Biomaterials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Selenium Nanomaterials to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance
Molecules 2021, 26(12), 3611; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26123611 - 12 Jun 2021
Viewed by 714
Abstract
The rise of antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics (AMR) as a healthcare crisis has led to a tremendous social and economic impact, whose damage poses a significant threat to future generations. Current treatments either are less effective or result in further acquired resistance. At [...] Read more.
The rise of antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics (AMR) as a healthcare crisis has led to a tremendous social and economic impact, whose damage poses a significant threat to future generations. Current treatments either are less effective or result in further acquired resistance. At the same time, several new antimicrobial discovery approaches are expensive, slow, and relatively poorly equipped for translation into the clinical world. Therefore, the use of nanomaterials is presented as a suitable solution. In particular, this review discusses selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) as one of the most promising therapeutic agents based in the nanoscale to treat infections effectively. This work summarizes the latest advances in the synthesis of SeNPs and their progress as antimicrobial agents using traditional and biogenic approaches. While physiochemical methods produce consistent nanostructures, along with shortened processing procedures and potential for functionalization of designs, green or biogenic synthesis represents a quick, inexpensive, efficient, and eco-friendly approach with more promise for tunability and versatility. In the end, the clinical translation of SeNPs faces various obstacles, including uncertain in vivo safety profiles and mechanisms of action and unclear regulatory frameworks. Nonetheless, the promise possessed by these metalloid nanostructures, along with other nanoparticles in treating bacterial infections and slowing down the AMR crisis, are worth exploring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Chemistry and Biomaterials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop