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Ecofriendly Inhibitor to Mitigate the Corrosion of Metals and Alloys

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 22600

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588, Republic of Korea
Interests: concrete technologies; building materials; corrosion protection; corrosion testing; thermal conductivity; phase change materials; structural engineering; concrete durability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Creative Convergence Education, Innovative Durable Building and Infrastructure Research Center, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588, Republic of Korea
Interests: concrete; cement; corrosion; inhibitor; durability of building and infrastructures; hydration of cement; cementitious supplementary materials; synthesis of nanocomposite coating; dual metal/polymer coating; thermal spray technology; hot-dip galvanizing; atmospheric corrosion; synthesis of novel materials for corrosion protection of metals and alloys; process to reduce the porosity of coating; phase change materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Intelligent Construction Automation Center, Kyungpook National University, 80, Daehak-ro, Buk-gu, Daegu 41566, Korea
Interests: corrosion; inhibitor; coatings; materials characterization; materials properties; X-ray Diffraction; SEM; TEM;thermal analysis; DSC; TGA; DTA; alloy synthesis; glass chemistry; materials testing; bulk metallic glass

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Corrosion destroys the characterics of metals and alloys, resulting in enormous economic losses across the world. There are many reasons for the initiation of metallic corrosion such as pollution owing to development of industries, the loss of metals during the acid pickling process in the steel industries and petroleum, and the ingress of aggressive ions into concrete leading to the initiation of rebar corrosion. Therefore, there are different corrosion mitigation approaches—such as the development of corrosion-resistant metals and alloys, different types of coating, and inhibitors that reduce the initiation of corrosion—being adopted by engineers, scientists, researchers, practitioners, professors and architects. However, inhibitors are one of the best methods for the mitigation of corrosion in the structural steel, oil and gas, and construction industries. Most of the chemicals being used in inhibitors are hazardous and toxic, which causes problems in the ecosystem. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to replace hazardous and toxic chemicals with less harmful substances. The use of ecofriendly corrosion inhibitors is the best option to reduce the burden on the environment and mitigate the corrosion of metals and alloys.

The main focus of this Special Issue on “Ecofriendly inhibitors to mitigate the corrosion of metals and alloys” is to provide and publish state-of-the-art and recent developments in the areas of construction and the marine, pickling and chemical industries. The topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

Petroleum;
The pickling industries;
Chemical engineering;
Building and construction;
Marine corrosion;
Material science and technology;
Chemical industries;
The oil and gas sector.

I would like to invite you with great pleasure to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications and reviews are all welcome.

I would also like to acknowledge, firstly, the authors who will write the articles that will form this new Special Issue. In addition, I would like to acknowledge the reviewers of the articles, who will carry out their work to help to maintain a high scientific level for this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Han-Seung Lee
Dr. Jitendra Kumar Singh
Dr. Soumen Mandal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Steel
  • Aluminum
  • Magnesium
  • Zinc
  • Copper
  • Alloys
  • Corrosion
  • Inhibitor
  • Green chemistry
  • Phosphate
  • Eco-friendly
  • Concrete
  • Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
  • Potentiodynamic polarization
  • Cyclic polarization
  • Open circuit potential
  • Nano-technology
  • Advanced materials and processes
  • X-ray diffraction
  • Scanning electron microscopy
  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Raman spectroscopy
  • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2838 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Adding Natural Gum to Pectin Extracted from Ecuadorian Citrus Peels as an Eco-Friendly Corrosion Inhibitor for Carbon Steel
by Jorge Núñez-Morales, Lorena I. Jaramillo, Patricio J. Espinoza-Montero and Vanessa E. Sánchez-Moreno
Molecules 2022, 27(7), 2111; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27072111 - 25 Mar 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2501
Abstract
The production and use of eco-friendly corrosion inhibitors allows valuable compounds contained in plant waste to be identified and repurposed while reducing the use of polluting synthetic substances. Pectin extracted from Tahiti limes (Citrus latifolia) and King mandarin (Citrus nobilis [...] Read more.
The production and use of eco-friendly corrosion inhibitors allows valuable compounds contained in plant waste to be identified and repurposed while reducing the use of polluting synthetic substances. Pectin extracted from Tahiti limes (Citrus latifolia) and King mandarin (Citrus nobilis L.) in addition to natural gums—xanthan gum and latex from the “lechero” plant (Euphorbia laurifolia)—were used to create an eco-friendly corrosion inhibitor. The optimal extraction conditions for pectin were determined from different combinations of pH, temperature, and time in a 23 factorial design and evaluated according to the obtained pectin yield. The highest pectin extraction yields (38.10% and 41.20% from King mandarin and lime, respectively) were reached at pH = 1, 85 °C, and 2 h. Extraction of pectic compounds was confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetry analyses. Subsequently, a simplex-centroid mixture design was applied to determine the formulation of extracted pectin and natural gums that achieved the highest corrosion inhibitor effect (linear polarization and weight loss methods in NACE 1D-196 saline media using API-5LX52 carbon steel). Impedance spectroscopy analysis showed that the addition of xanthan gum to pectin (formulation 50% pectin–50% xanthan gum) improved the corrosion inhibitor effect from 29.20 to 78.21% at 400 ppm due to higher adsorption of inhibitory molecules on the metal surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecofriendly Inhibitor to Mitigate the Corrosion of Metals and Alloys)
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17 pages, 14025 KiB  
Article
Natural Product-Derived Phosphonic Acids as Corrosion Inhibitors for Iron and Steel
by Erik Ruf, Tim Naundorf, Tom Seddig, Helmut Kipphardt and Wolfgang Maison
Molecules 2022, 27(6), 1778; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27061778 - 8 Mar 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2664
Abstract
Organic acids, typically derived from an oil-based value chain, are frequently used as corrosion inhibitors in industrial metal working fluids. The criteria for selection of these corrosion inhibitors have changed in the last decades, and are today not only performance-driven, but influenced by [...] Read more.
Organic acids, typically derived from an oil-based value chain, are frequently used as corrosion inhibitors in industrial metal working fluids. The criteria for selection of these corrosion inhibitors have changed in the last decades, and are today not only performance-driven, but influenced by ecological considerations, toxicity and regulatory standards. We present scalable semisynthetic approaches to organic corrosion inhibitors based on phosphonic acids from renewable resources. They have been evaluated by chip filter assay, potentiodynamic polarization measurements, electrochemical impedance measurements and gravimetry for corrosion protection of iron and steel in an aqueous environment at slightly alkaline pH. The efficacy of several phosphonic acids tested was found to be strongly dependent on structural features influencing molecular self-assembly of protective layers, and the solubility of salts formed with di- and trivalent cations from the media or formed during corrosion. A carboxyphosphonic acid (derived from castor oil) was found to have remarkable anticorrosive effects in all media tested. We attribute the anticorrosion properties of this carboxyphosphonic acid to the formation of particularly stable protective layers on the metal surface. It might thus serve as a commercially attractive substitute for current acidic corrosion inhibitors, derived from renewable resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecofriendly Inhibitor to Mitigate the Corrosion of Metals and Alloys)
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12 pages, 2154 KiB  
Article
Croton lechleri Extracts as Green Corrosion Inhibitors of Admiralty Brass in Hydrochloric Acid
by Carlos Cevallos-Morillo, Pablo Cisneros-Pérez, Roxana Llive, Marvin Ricaurte, Carlos Reinoso, Miguel Angel Meneses, Maria del Cisne Guamán and Alex Palma-Cando
Molecules 2021, 26(24), 7417; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26247417 - 7 Dec 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3753
Abstract
Croton lechleri, commonly known as Dragon’s blood, is a tree cultivated in the northwest Amazon rainforest of Ecuador and Peru. This tree produces a deep red latex which is composed of different natural products such as phenolic compounds, alkaloids, and others. The chemical [...] Read more.
Croton lechleri, commonly known as Dragon’s blood, is a tree cultivated in the northwest Amazon rainforest of Ecuador and Peru. This tree produces a deep red latex which is composed of different natural products such as phenolic compounds, alkaloids, and others. The chemical structures of these natural products found in C. lechleri latex are promising corrosion inhibitors of admiralty brass (AB), due to the number of heteroatoms and π structures. In this work, three different extracts of C. lechleri latex were obtained, characterized phytochemically, and employed as novel green corrosion inhibitors of AB. The corrosion inhibition efficiency (IE%) was determined in an aqueous 0.5 M HCl solution by potentiodynamic polarization (Tafel plots) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, measuring current density and charge transfer resistance, respectively. In addition, surface characterization of AB was performed by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. Chloroform alkaloid-rich extracts resulted in IE% of 57% at 50 ppm, attributed to the formation of a layer of organic compounds on the AB surface that hindered the dezincification process. The formulation of corrosion inhibitors from C. lechleri latex allows for the valorization of non-edible natural sources and the diversification of the offer of green corrosion inhibitors for the chemical treatment of heat exchangers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecofriendly Inhibitor to Mitigate the Corrosion of Metals and Alloys)
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17 pages, 4201 KiB  
Article
Experimental, DFT and MD Assessments of Bark Extract of Tamarix aphylla as Corrosion Inhibitor for Carbon Steel Used in Desalination Plants
by Ismat H. Ali
Molecules 2021, 26(12), 3679; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26123679 - 16 Jun 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1917
Abstract
This study aimed to examine the extract of barks of Tamarix aphylla as a corrosion inhibitor. The methodology briefly includes plant sample collection, extraction of the corrosion inhibitor, gravimetric analysis, plotting potentiodynamic polarization plots, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements, optimization of conditions, and preparation [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine the extract of barks of Tamarix aphylla as a corrosion inhibitor. The methodology briefly includes plant sample collection, extraction of the corrosion inhibitor, gravimetric analysis, plotting potentiodynamic polarization plots, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements, optimization of conditions, and preparation of the inhibitor products. The results show that the values of inhibition efficiency (IE%) increased as the concentrations of the inhibitor increased, with a maximum achievable inhibition efficiency of 85.0%. Potentiodynamic polarization (PP) tests revealed that the extract acts as a dual-type inhibitor. The results obtained from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements indicate an increase in polarisation resistance, confirming the inhibitive capacity of the tested inhibitor. The adsorption of the inhibitor on the steel surface follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model and involves competitive physio-sorption and chemisorption mechanisms. The EIS technique was utilized to investigate the effect of temperature on corrosion inhibition within the 298–328 K temperature range. Results confirm that the inhibition efficiency (IE%) of the inhibitor decreased slightly as the temperature increased. Lastly, the thermodynamic parameters for the inhibitor were calculated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecofriendly Inhibitor to Mitigate the Corrosion of Metals and Alloys)
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20 pages, 39435 KiB  
Article
Role of Organic and Eco-Friendly Inhibitors on the Corrosion Mitigation of Steel in Acidic Environments—A State-of-Art Review
by Hyun-Min Yang
Molecules 2021, 26(11), 3473; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26113473 - 7 Jun 2021
Cited by 63 | Viewed by 4873
Abstract
Steel has versatile application in chemical, structure and construction industries owing to its mechanical properties. However, it is susceptible to corrosion in acid environments. Thus, it requires to protect the steel from corrosion. Different types of corrosion resistance steel, coatings and inhibitors are [...] Read more.
Steel has versatile application in chemical, structure and construction industries owing to its mechanical properties. However, it is susceptible to corrosion in acid environments. Thus, it requires to protect the steel from corrosion. Different types of corrosion resistance steel, coatings and inhibitors are developed to mitigate the corrosion, but, inhibitor is the best remedies to control the corrosion of steel in acid condition. Moreover, organic and green inhibitors used in acid condition for descaling, acid pickling, pipelines, boiler tubes and oil-wells. Organic inhibitors reduce the dissolution of steel in acid but, it is hazardous, expensive and needs expertise to synthesize the inhibitor. Therefore, there is utmost required to study and compile the latest research about the eco-friendly corrosion inhibitors, which showed more than 90% corrosion inhibition efficiency. In the present study, I have reviewed the state-of-arts, and compile the latest development in organic and eco-friendly corrosion inhibitor used in acid environment as well as suggested about the future scope and role of green inhibitor for sustainable society, which is economical, less hazardous and readily available from the natural sources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecofriendly Inhibitor to Mitigate the Corrosion of Metals and Alloys)
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18 pages, 25979 KiB  
Article
Anticorrosive and Microbial Inhibition Performance of a Coating Loaded with Andrographis paniculata on Stainless Steel in Seawater
by Wan Mohamad Ikhmal Wan Mohamad Kamaruzzaman, Maria Fazira Mohd Fekeri, Nursabrina Amirah Mohd Nasir, Nur Aiman Syafiq Mohd Hamidi, Mohamad Zahid Baharom, Azila Adnan, Muhamad Syaizwadi Shaifudin, Wan Rafizah Wan Abdullah, Wan Mohd Norsani Wan Nik, Fariza Hanim Suhailin, Khamirul Amin Matori, Chen Soo Kien, Mohd Hafiz Mohd Zaid and Mohd Sabri Mohd Ghazali
Molecules 2021, 26(11), 3379; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26113379 - 3 Jun 2021
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2781
Abstract
With the trend for green technology, the study focused on utilizing a forgotten herb to produce an eco-friendly coating. Andrographis paniculata or the kalmegh leaves extract (KLE) has been investigated for its abilities in retarding the corrosion process due to its excellent anti-oxidative [...] Read more.
With the trend for green technology, the study focused on utilizing a forgotten herb to produce an eco-friendly coating. Andrographis paniculata or the kalmegh leaves extract (KLE) has been investigated for its abilities in retarding the corrosion process due to its excellent anti-oxidative and antimicrobial properties. Here, KLE was employed as a novel additive in coatings and formulations were made by varying its wt%: 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12. These were applied to stainless steel 316L immersed in seawater for up to 50 days. The samples were characterized and analyzed to measure effectiveness of inhibition of corrosion and microbial growth. The best concentration was revealed to be 6 wt% KLE; it exhibited the highest performance in improving the ionic resistance of the coating and reducing the growth of bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecofriendly Inhibitor to Mitigate the Corrosion of Metals and Alloys)
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17 pages, 3614 KiB  
Article
Synthesis and Assessment of Two Malonyl Dihydrazide Derivatives as Corrosion Inhibitors for Carbon Steel in Acidic Media: Experimental and Theoretical Studies
by Saleh S. Alarfaji, Ismat H. Ali, Mutasem Z. Bani-Fwaz and Mahmoud A. Bedair
Molecules 2021, 26(11), 3183; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26113183 - 26 May 2021
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 2545
Abstract
Despite the extensive use of carbon steel in all industrial sectors, particularly in the petroleum industry, its low corrosion resistance is an ongoing problem for these industries. In the current work, two malonyl dihydrazide derivatives, namely 2,2’-malonylbis (N-phenylhydrazine-1-carbothiamide (MBC) and N [...] Read more.
Despite the extensive use of carbon steel in all industrial sectors, particularly in the petroleum industry, its low corrosion resistance is an ongoing problem for these industries. In the current work, two malonyl dihydrazide derivatives, namely 2,2’-malonylbis (N-phenylhydrazine-1-carbothiamide (MBC) and N’1, N’3-bis(-2-hydroxybenzylidene) malonohydrazide (HBM), were examined as inhibitors for the carbon steel corrosion in 1.0 M HCl. Both MBC and HBM were characterised using thin-layer chromatography, elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The corrosion tests were performed using mass loss measurements, polarisation curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is obtained from the mass loss studies that the optimal concentration for both inhibitors is 2.0 × 10−5 mol/L, and the inhibition efficiencies reached up to 90.7% and 84.5% for MBC and HBM, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarisation (PDP) indicate an increased impedance in the presence of both MBC and HBM and mixed-type inhibitors, respectively. Both inhibitors can mitigate corrosion in the range of 298–328 K. Values of free energy changes obtained from the Langmuir model suggest that the inhibitors suppress the corrosion process principally by chemisorption. The computational investigations were conducted to identify the factors connected with the anti-corrosive properties of the examined inhibitors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecofriendly Inhibitor to Mitigate the Corrosion of Metals and Alloys)
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