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Special Issue "Antibacterial Materials and Coatings 2018"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Krasimir Vasilev

Mawson Institute and School of Engineering, Mawson Lakes Campus, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes SA 5095, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61-8-830-25697
Fax: +61-8-830-25689
Interests: Antibacterial coatings; biomaterials; medical devices; plasma polymers; surface modification; biointerfaces; drug delivery; nanomaterials
Guest Editor
Dr. Thomas Michl

Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Blvd, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: antifungal & antibacterial surface coatings, low-fouling coatings, plasma polymerization, SI-ATRP, contact-killing materials, thin films, surface analysis
Guest Editor
Dr. Alex Cavallaro

Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: antimicrobial surface coatings; biomaterials; controlled\targeted drug release systems; nanomaterials; nanotoxicology
Guest Editor
Dr. Peter Zilm

Microbiology Laboratory, The School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bacterial resistance; oral microbiology; proteomics; endodontic microbiology; continuous culture; Enterococcus faecalis; Fusobacterium nucleatum; Staphylococcus aureus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Undesired bacterial adhesion and colonization is a problem in numerous areas of everyday life. This problem has been well recognized and documented. Bacterial infections cause death and suffering, and enormous added costs to healthcare worldwide. Furthermore, undesired bacterial colonization and the subsequent biofilm formation cause major issues in many other industries, such as those of food processing and storage, marine transport and management, and water treatment.

It has been a pivotal goal of humans to control bacteria–surface interactions. Despite the tremendous research efforts by academic researchers, industry and medical workers, a comprehensive solution to the problem of controlling bacterial surface colonization has not been found. Antibiotics, rightly considered as the greatest medical discovery of the 20th century, have provided a substantial relief to patients and society overall. However, the capacity of microorganisms to develop resistance to antibiotics has emerged as a significant challenge.

Over the last couple of decades, numerous novel antibacterial materials and coating have been developed. Some of these have even translated from the laboratory to saving lives in hospitals. This Special Issue aims to bring together the latest advances in the field of antibacterial materials and coatings and their application in various fields. This Special Issue also aims to highlight the challenges and obstacles that need to be overcome to provide a comprehensive understanding and effective control of bacteria - surface interactions. 

We invite investigators to contribute original research articles, as well as review articles, that will inspire research towards the next generation of antibacterial materials and coatings and their applications. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Antibacterial coatings
  • Antibacterial materials
  • Bacteria–surface interactions
  • Antibacterial nanomaterials
  • Applications of antibacterial materials and coatings
  • Biofilm dispersing materials
  • Diagnostics of bacterial contamination
Prof. Dr. Krasimir Vasilev
Dr. Thomas D. Michl
Dr. Alex Cavallaro
Dr. Peter Zilm
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibacterial materials
  • antibacterial coatings
  • bacteria
  • biofilm
  • infection

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Surface Functionalization of an Aluminum Alloy to Generate an Antibiofilm Coating Based on Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) and Silver Nanoparticles
Molecules 2018, 23(11), 2747; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23112747
Received: 18 September 2018 / Revised: 19 October 2018 / Accepted: 22 October 2018 / Published: 24 October 2018
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Abstract
An experimental protocol was studied to improve the adhesion of a polymeric poly(methyl methacrylate) coating that was modified with silver nanoparticles to an aluminum alloy, AA2024. The nanoparticles were incorporated into the polymeric matrix to add the property of inhibiting biofilm formation to
[...] Read more.
An experimental protocol was studied to improve the adhesion of a polymeric poly(methyl methacrylate) coating that was modified with silver nanoparticles to an aluminum alloy, AA2024. The nanoparticles were incorporated into the polymeric matrix to add the property of inhibiting biofilm formation to the anticorrosive characteristics of the film, thus also making the coating antibiocorrosive. The protocol consists of functionalizing the surface through a pseudotransesterification treatment using a methyl methacrylate monomer that bonds covalently to the surface and leaves a terminal double bond that promotes and directs the polymerization reaction that takes place in the process that follows immediately after. This results in more compact and thicker poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) coatings than those obtained without pseudotransesterification. The poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix modified with nanoparticles was obtained by incorporating both the nanoparticles and the methyl methacrylate in the reactor. The in situ polymerization involved combining the pretreated AA2024 specimens combined with the methyl methacrylate monomer and AgNps. The antibiofilm capacity of the coating was evaluated against P. aeruginosa, with an excellent response. Not only did the presence of bacteria decrease, but the formation of the exopolymer subunits was 99.99% lower than on the uncoated aluminum alloy or the alloy coated with unmodified poly(methyl methacrylate). As well and significantly, the potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicate that the PMMA-Ag coating has a good anticorrosive property in a 0.1-M NaCl medium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Materials and Coatings 2018)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Physical and Antibacterial Properties of Sodium Alginate—Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose Films Containing Lactococcus lactis
Molecules 2018, 23(10), 2645; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23102645
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 13 October 2018 / Published: 15 October 2018
PDF Full-text (1848 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Edible films have gradually become a research focus for food packaging materials due to a variety of benefits, including environmental friendliness, good barrier properties, and good carrying capacity. In this experimental study, we used sodium alginate as a film-forming substrate, sodium carboxymethylcellulose as
[...] Read more.
Edible films have gradually become a research focus for food packaging materials due to a variety of benefits, including environmental friendliness, good barrier properties, and good carrying capacity. In this experimental study, we used sodium alginate as a film-forming substrate, sodium carboxymethylcellulose as a modifier, and glycerol as a plasticizer, then Lactococcus lactis was added to film solutions to form bacteriostatic films via the tape casting method. With the addition of Lactococcus lactis, the films did not significantly change thickness, while the transparency decreased and a significant increase in red and yellow hues was observed. Meanwhile, the dispersion of bacterial cells in film solutions destroyed intermolecular interactions in the solutions during film formation and increased the volume of voids in the Lactococcus lactis-containing films, thereby slightly decreasing the tensile strength of the films, but significantly increasing water vapor permeability. Moreover, the films with added Lactococcus lactis showed significant bacteriostatic activity against Staphylococcus aureus at 4 °C. In a seven-day bacteriostatic test, the films with Lactococcus lactis added at a level of 1.5 g/100 g resulted in a decrease in the viable cell count of Staphylococcus aureus by at least four logarithmic units. This study of Lactococcus lactis-containing films has provided a new method and strategy for antibacterial preservation of foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Materials and Coatings 2018)
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Open AccessArticle Characterization of Antibacterial Cell-Free Supernatant from Oral Care Probiotic Weissella cibaria, CMU
Molecules 2018, 23(8), 1984; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23081984
Received: 11 July 2018 / Revised: 4 August 2018 / Accepted: 5 August 2018 / Published: 9 August 2018
PDF Full-text (1194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recently, studies have explored the use of probiotics like the Weissella cibaria strain, CMU (oraCMU), for use as preventive dental medicine instead of chemical oral care methods. The present study was conducted to investigate the antibacterial properties of the cell-free supernatant (CFS) from
[...] Read more.
Recently, studies have explored the use of probiotics like the Weissella cibaria strain, CMU (oraCMU), for use as preventive dental medicine instead of chemical oral care methods. The present study was conducted to investigate the antibacterial properties of the cell-free supernatant (CFS) from this bacterium. Cell morphology using the scanning electron microscope, and the antibacterial effect of CFS under various growth conditions were evaluated. The production of hydrogen peroxide, organic acids, fatty acids, and secretory proteins was also studied. Most of the antibacterial effects of oraCMU against periodontal pathogens were found to be acid- and hydrogen peroxide-dose-dependent effects. Lactic acid, acetic acid, and citric acid were the most common organic acids. Among the 37 fatty acids, only 0.02% of oleic acid (C18:1n-9, cis) was detected. Proteomic analysis of the oraCMU secretome identified a total of 19 secreted proteins, including N-acetylmuramidase. This protein may be a potential anti-microbial agent effective against Porphyromonas gingivalis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Materials and Coatings 2018)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Viability, Enzymatic and Protein Profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm and Planktonic Cells after Monomeric/Gemini Surfactant Treatment
Molecules 2018, 23(6), 1294; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23061294
Received: 16 April 2018 / Revised: 23 May 2018 / Accepted: 26 May 2018 / Published: 28 May 2018
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Abstract
This study set out to investigate the biological activity of monomeric surfactants dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and the next generation gemini surfactant hexamethylene-1,6-bis-(N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylammonium bromide) (C6) against the environmental strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PB_1. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined
[...] Read more.
This study set out to investigate the biological activity of monomeric surfactants dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and the next generation gemini surfactant hexamethylene-1,6-bis-(N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylammonium bromide) (C6) against the environmental strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PB_1. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined using the dilution method. The viability of the planktonic cells and biofilm was assessed using the plate count method. Enzymatic profile was determined using the API-ZYM system. Proteins were extracted from the biofilm and planktonic cells and analysed using SDS-PAGE. The MIC of the gemini surfactants was 70 times lower than that of its monomeric analogue. After 4 h of treatment at MIC (0.0145 mM for C6 and 1.013 mM for DTAB), the number of viable planktonic cells was reduce by less than 3 logarithm units. At the concentration ≥MIC, a reduction in the number of viable cells was observed in mature biofilms (p < 0.05). Treatment for 4 h with gemini surfactant at 20 MIC caused complete biofilm eradication. At sub-MIC, the concentration of some enzymes reduced and their protein profiles changed. The results of this study show that due to its superior antibacterial activity, gemini compound C6 can be applied as an effective microbiocide against P. aeruginosa in both planktonic and biofilm forms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Materials and Coatings 2018)
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