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Special Issue "Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hermann Stuppner

Institute of Pharmacy/Pharmacognosy, Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural products; pharmacognosy; phytochemistry; analytics; molecular modeling
Guest Editor
Prof. Alexios-Leandros Skaltsounis

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Health Sciences, Department of Pharmacognosy and Chemistry of Natural Products, Athens, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: “Green” chemistry and large-scale extraction of high added value natural products; Isolation of natural products leads; Identification and structure elucidation of natural products; Semi- and total- synthesis of natural products; Characterisation of natural extracts; Design and synthesis of new molecules with pharmacological interest; Structure-activity relationships

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the absence of overt disease, changes in nutrition and lifestyle are by far the most cost-efficient ways to promote healthy ageing at the population level. Ageing is a complex molecular process driven by diverse molecular pathways that are promoted by both environmental and genetic factors. Numerous studies show that natural compounds represent an amazing inventory of high diversity structural scaffolds that can offer promising candidates in the major healthcare challenge of increasing healthspan and delaying ageing. Especially plant derived compounds (either pure forms or extracts) are involved in several physiological processes and have been shown to possess significant beneficial (chemo-preventive/ delaying cellular senescence or in vivo ageing) effects on human health and to support healthy aging. Plants offer not only products of their primary metabolism, e.g., carbohydrates, proteins or lipids, but also a variety of biologically active secondary natural products (NPs) like polyphenols, essential oils, alkaloids, and many others which exhibit pleiotropic and, likely, therapeutic effects in humans. Today, it is assumed that the generation of NPs has been subjected to natural selection during evolution since the presence of particular secondary metabolite improves the capacity for survival and reproduction of the producing organism. Up to now, approximately 200,000 metabolites have been elucidated in plants and it is expected that the final number will exceed 500,000.

This Special Issue on “Natural Products and Age Related Diseases” will cover several aspects, such as:

  • Medicinal plants used as diet with anti aging effects
  • Plant collection, ethnopharmacology, benefit sharing
  • Pharmacological aspects of aging
  • Key modulators of ageing and age-associated related diseases
  • Mechanism(s) of natural products in prevention of age-related disease
  • Natural products affecting cellular aging signaling
  • Advanced analytical approaches and techniques (microfractionation, microprobe-NMR, LC-SPE-NMR, LC-HR-MSn) and dereplication strategies
  • In vitro and in vivo assays to identify bioactive extracts and NPs with health-span and longevity promoting effects
  • Pharmacokinetics of NPs
  • Gastrointestinal metabolisation of plant derived compounds
  • Aging—computational tools and medicinal chemistry concepts in anti-aging research
Prof. Dr. Hermann Stuppner
Prof. Dr. Leandros A. Skaltsounis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aging
  • natural products
  • pharmacology
  • phytochemistry
  • biological effects
  • pharmakinetics
  • plants

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Phytochemical Composition of the Decoctions of Greek Edible Greens (Chórta) and Evaluation of Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Properties
Molecules 2018, 23(7), 1541; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23071541
Received: 20 May 2018 / Revised: 19 June 2018 / Accepted: 21 June 2018 / Published: 26 June 2018
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Abstract
Wild or semi-wild edible greens (chórta) are an integral part of the traditional Greek Mediterranean diet due to their nutritional value, containing various phytonutrients beneficial to human health. Water-based decoctions of chórta are widely consumed in Greek alternative medicine as health promoting agents.
[...] Read more.
Wild or semi-wild edible greens (chórta) are an integral part of the traditional Greek Mediterranean diet due to their nutritional value, containing various phytonutrients beneficial to human health. Water-based decoctions of chórta are widely consumed in Greek alternative medicine as health promoting agents. This study examined the chemical profile of the decoctions of eight edible plants, Cichorium intybus, C. endivia, C. spinosum, Crepis sancta, Sonchus asper, Carthamus lanatus, Centaurea raphanina, and Amaranthus blitum, by UPLC-ESI-HRMS and HRMS/MS analysis, to determine possibly bioactive constituents. The profiles of the plants from the Asteraceae family are dominated by the presence of phenolic acids and flavonoid derivatives, whereas the A. blitum decoction is rich in triterpene saponins. Interestingly, the Centaurea raphanina decoction was found to be extremely rich in flavanones, particularly in the aglycone pinocembrin. Further phytochemical investigation and fractionation of this extract resulted in the isolation and identification of five compounds: phlorin (1), syringin (2), pinocembrin (3), pinocembroside (4), and pinocembrin-7-O-neohesperidoside (5). The extracts were also tested for their antioxidant and differential cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. C. raphanina was found to be differentially toxic against metastatic tumor cells. In conclusion, we found that Greek edible greens are a rich source of bioactive secondary metabolites and their consumption could contribute to the maintenance of overall health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Scutellarin Mitigates Aβ-Induced Neurotoxicity and Improves Behavior Impairments in AD Mice
Molecules 2018, 23(4), 869; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23040869
Received: 10 March 2018 / Revised: 2 April 2018 / Accepted: 6 April 2018 / Published: 10 April 2018
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Abstract
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is pathologically characterized by excessive accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) within extracellular spaces of the brain. Aggregation of Aβ has been shown to trigger oxidative stress, inflammation, and neurotoxicity resulting in cognitive dysfunction. In this study, we use models of cerebral
[...] Read more.
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is pathologically characterized by excessive accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) within extracellular spaces of the brain. Aggregation of Aβ has been shown to trigger oxidative stress, inflammation, and neurotoxicity resulting in cognitive dysfunction. In this study, we use models of cerebral Aβ amyloidosis to investigate anti-amyloidogenic effects of scutellarin in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that scutellarin, through binding to Aβ42, efficiently inhibits oligomerization as well as fibril formation and reduces Aβ oligomer-induced neuronal toxicity in cell line SH-SY5Y. After nine months of treatment in APP/PS1 double-transgenic mice, scutellarin significantly improves behavior, reduces soluble and insoluble Aβ levels in the brain and plasma, decreases Aβ plaque associated gliosis and levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, attenuates neuroinflammation, displays anti-amyloidogenic effects, and highlights the beneficial effects of intervention on development or progression of AD-like neuropathology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Antioxidant Activity of Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) Protein Fractions
Molecules 2018, 23(3), 707; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23030707
Received: 21 February 2018 / Revised: 11 March 2018 / Accepted: 18 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
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Abstract
Coconut cake is an abundant and good potential edible protein source. However, until now it has not been extensively used in the food industry. To promote its usage, the characterization, nutrition value and antioxidant activity of coconut cake protein fractions (albumin, globulin, prolamine,
[...] Read more.
Coconut cake is an abundant and good potential edible protein source. However, until now it has not been extensively used in the food industry. To promote its usage, the characterization, nutrition value and antioxidant activity of coconut cake protein fractions (albumin, globulin, prolamine, glutelin-1 and glutelin-2) were studied. Results revealed that all the albumin, globulin, glutelin-1 and glutelin-2 fractions showed a high nutrition value. The prolamine, glutelin-1 and glutelin-2 all exhibited good radical scavenging activity and reducing power, and the globulin and prolamine showed high ion chelating ability (89.14–80.38%). Moreover, all the fractions except glutelin-2 could effectively protect DNA against oxidative damage. Several peptides containing five to eight amino acids with antioxidant activity were also identified by LC-MS/MS from the globulin and glutelin-2 fractions. The results demonstrated that the coconut cake protein fractions have potential usages in functional foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Identification of the NADPH Oxidase 4 Inhibiting Principle of Lycopus europaeus
Molecules 2018, 23(3), 653; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23030653
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 14 March 2018
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Abstract
NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) has recently been implicated as driving force in cellular senescence. Thus, there is growing interest to develop Nox4 inhibitors, which might be valuable agents for cosmeceutical applications. Alpine plants represent a valuable source for the identification of novel bioactive
[...] Read more.
NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) has recently been implicated as driving force in cellular senescence. Thus, there is growing interest to develop Nox4 inhibitors, which might be valuable agents for cosmeceutical applications. Alpine plants represent a valuable source for the identification of novel bioactive natural products with anti-ageing effects, especially substances that protect plants against UV radiation, which is also known to contribute to the ageing of human skin. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify novel Nox4 inhibitors from alpine plants. Within an initial screening of extracts of alpine plants on their ability to inhibit Nox4 activity in HEK cells, the methanolic extract of the subaerial parts of Lycopus europaeus showed a strong inhibition of Nox4 (81% chemiluminescence quenching) and a simultaneously high cell viability (91% vitality). Rosmarinic acid was isolated and identified as the major compound in this bioactive extract. It showed a dose dependent inhibitory activity on Nox4 with an IC50 of 1 µM. Moreover, it also showed a significant inhibitory activity on Nox2 in the low micromolar range, whereas no inhibition of Nox5 was detected. Further investigations confirmed that the observed effects of rosmarinic acid on Nox2 and Nox4 are real inhibitory activities, and not due to ROS scavenging effects. Therefore, L. europaeus, which we demonstrated to be a good source of rosmarinic acid, has great potential for usage in cosmeceutical products with anti-ageing activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Lung Cancer Chemopreventive Activity of Patulin Isolated from Penicillium vulpinum
Molecules 2018, 23(3), 636; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23030636
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 12 March 2018
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Abstract
Lung cancer is the most lethal form of cancer in the world. Its development often involves an overactivation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, leading to increased cell proliferation, survival, mobility, and a decrease in apoptosis. Therefore, NF-κB inhibitors are actively
[...] Read more.
Lung cancer is the most lethal form of cancer in the world. Its development often involves an overactivation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, leading to increased cell proliferation, survival, mobility, and a decrease in apoptosis. Therefore, NF-κB inhibitors are actively sought after for both cancer chemoprevention and therapy, and fungi represent an interesting unexplored reservoir for such molecules. The aim of the present work was to find naturally occurring lung cancer chemopreventive compounds by investigating the metabolites of Penicillium vulpinum, a fungus that grows naturally on dung. Penicillium vulpinum was cultivated in Potato Dextrose Broth and extracted with ethyl acetate. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract was performed by measuring NF-κB activity using a HEK293 cell line transfected with an NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter gene. The mycotoxin patulin was identified as a nanomolar inhibitor of TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot analyses revealed that its mechanism of action involved an inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation and was independent from the NF-κB inhibitor α (IκBα) degradation process. Enhancing its interest in lung cancer chemoprevention, patulin also exhibited antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antimigration effects on human lung adenocarcinoma cells through inhibition of the Wnt pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Calycophyllum spruceanum (Benth.), the Amazonian “Tree of Youth” Prolongs Longevity and Enhances Stress Resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans
Molecules 2018, 23(3), 534; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23030534
Received: 23 January 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 22 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
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Abstract
The tree popularly known in Brazil as mulateiro or pau-mulato (Calycophyllum spruceanum (Benth.) K. Schum.) is deeply embedded in the herbal medicine of the Amazon region. Different preparations of the bark are claimed to have anti-aging, antioxidant, antimicrobial, emollient, wound healing, hemostatic,
[...] Read more.
The tree popularly known in Brazil as mulateiro or pau-mulato (Calycophyllum spruceanum (Benth.) K. Schum.) is deeply embedded in the herbal medicine of the Amazon region. Different preparations of the bark are claimed to have anti-aging, antioxidant, antimicrobial, emollient, wound healing, hemostatic, contraceptive, stimulant, and anti-diabetic properties. The current study aims to provide the first step towards a science-based evidence of the beneficial effects of C. spruceanum in the promotion of longevity and in the modulation of age-related markers. For this investigation, we used the model system Caenorhabditis elegans to evaluate in vivo antioxidant and anti-aging activity of a water extract from C. spruceanum. To chemically characterize the extract, HPLC MS (High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry)/MS analyses were performed. Five secondary metabolites were identified in the extract, namely gardenoside, 5-hydroxymorin, cyanidin, taxifolin, and 5-hydroxy-6-methoxycoumarin-7-glucoside. C. spruceanum extract was able to enhance stress resistance and to extend lifespan along with attenuation of aging-associated markers in C. elegans. The demonstrated bioactivities apparently depend on the DAF-16/FOXO pathway. The data might support the popular claims of mulateiro as the “tree of youth”, however more studies are needed to clarify its putative benefits to human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Triterpene Acids from Frankincense and Semi-Synthetic Derivatives That Inhibit 5-Lipoxygenase and Cathepsin G
Molecules 2018, 23(2), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23020506
Received: 2 February 2018 / Revised: 21 February 2018 / Accepted: 21 February 2018 / Published: 24 February 2018
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Abstract
Age-related diseases, such as osteoarthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, are often associated with chronic unresolved inflammation. Neutrophils play central roles in this process by releasing tissue-degenerative proteases, such as cathepsin G, as well as pro-inflammatory leukotrienes produced by the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO)
[...] Read more.
Age-related diseases, such as osteoarthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, are often associated with chronic unresolved inflammation. Neutrophils play central roles in this process by releasing tissue-degenerative proteases, such as cathepsin G, as well as pro-inflammatory leukotrienes produced by the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway. Boswellic acids (BAs) are pentacyclic triterpene acids contained in the gum resin of the anti-inflammatory remedy frankincense that target cathepsin G and 5-LO in neutrophils, and might thus represent suitable leads for intervention with age-associated diseases that have a chronic inflammatory component. Here, we investigated whether, in addition to BAs, other triterpene acids from frankincense interfere with 5-LO and cathepsin G. We provide a comprehensive analysis of 17 natural tetra- or pentacyclic triterpene acids for suppression of 5-LO product synthesis in human neutrophils. These triterpene acids were also investigated for their direct interference with 5-LO and cathepsin G in cell-free assays. Furthermore, our studies were expanded to 10 semi-synthetic BA derivatives. Our data reveal that besides BAs, several tetra- and pentacyclic triterpene acids are effective or even superior inhibitors of 5-LO product formation in human neutrophils, and in parallel, inhibit cathepsin G. Their beneficial target profile may qualify triterpene acids as anti-inflammatory natural products and pharmacological leads for intervention with diseases related to aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Dietary Total Prenylflavonoids from the Fruits of Psoralea corylifolia L. Prevents Age-Related Cognitive Deficits and Down-Regulates Alzheimer’s Markers in SAMP8 Mice
Molecules 2018, 23(1), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23010196
Received: 2 January 2018 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 18 January 2018
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Abstract
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a serious threat for the aging society. In this study, we examined the preventive effect of the total prenylflavonoids (TPFB) prepared from the dried fruits of Psoralea corylifolia L., using an age-related AD mouse model SAMP8. We found that
[...] Read more.
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a serious threat for the aging society. In this study, we examined the preventive effect of the total prenylflavonoids (TPFB) prepared from the dried fruits of Psoralea corylifolia L., using an age-related AD mouse model SAMP8. We found that long-term dietary TPFB at 50 mg/kg·day significantly improved cognitive performance of the SAMP8 mice in Morris water maze tests, similar to 150 mg/kg·day of resveratrol, a popular neuro-protective compound. Furthermore, TPFB treatment showed significant improvements in various AD markers in SAMP8 brains, which were restored to near control levels of the normal mice, SAMR1. TPFB significantly reduced the level of amyloid β-peptide 42 (Aβ42), inhibited hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, induced phosphorylation of Ser9 of the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), and decreased the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β. Finally, TPFB also markedly reduced the level of serum derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs), a biomarker of oxidative stress in vivo. These results showed that dietary TPFB could effectively prevent age-related cognitive deficits and AD-like neurobiochemical changes, and may have a potential role in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Steppogenin Isolated from Cudrania tricuspidata Shows Antineuroinflammatory Effects via NF-κB and MAPK Pathways in LPS-Stimulated BV2 and Primary Rat Microglial Cells
Molecules 2017, 22(12), 2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules22122130
Received: 18 October 2017 / Revised: 21 November 2017 / Accepted: 29 November 2017 / Published: 2 December 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5529 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Correction
Abstract
Excessive microglial stimulation has been recognized in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS), HIV-associated dementia (HAD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and stroke. When microglia are stimulated, they produce proinflammatory mediators and cytokines, including nitric oxide (NO)
[...] Read more.
Excessive microglial stimulation has been recognized in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS), HIV-associated dementia (HAD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and stroke. When microglia are stimulated, they produce proinflammatory mediators and cytokines, including nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) derived from cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-12 (IL-12), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). These inflammatory reactions are related to the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Therefore, the modulation of NF-κB and MAPK is vital to prevent microglial activation and confer resistance against neuronal injury. In this study, steppogenin (1) isolated from Cudrania tricuspidata suppressed the neuroinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Steppogenin (1) inhibited the production of proinflammatory mediators and cytokines in LPS-challenged BV2 and rat primary microglial cells. Moreover, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence revealed that the nuclear translocation of NF-κB was inhibited in LPS-induced BV2 and rat primary microglial cells. The LPS-stimulated activation of BV2 and rat primary microglial cells was inhibited by steppogenin (1) through the suppression of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK signaling. These results suggested that steppogenin (1) exerted antineuroinflammatory effects against acute neuroinflammation in BV2 and rat primary microglial cells by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling and the production of proinflammatory mediators and cytokines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Targeting Protein Quality Control Mechanisms by Natural Products to Promote Healthy Ageing
Molecules 2018, 23(5), 1219; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23051219
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 9 May 2018 / Accepted: 13 May 2018 / Published: 19 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2024 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Organismal ageing is associated with increased chance of morbidity or mortality and it is driven by diverse molecular pathways that are affected by both environmental and genetic factors. The progression of ageing correlates with the gradual accumulation of stressors and damaged biomolecules due
[...] Read more.
Organismal ageing is associated with increased chance of morbidity or mortality and it is driven by diverse molecular pathways that are affected by both environmental and genetic factors. The progression of ageing correlates with the gradual accumulation of stressors and damaged biomolecules due to the time-dependent decline of stress resistance and functional capacity, which eventually compromise cellular homeodynamics. As protein machines carry out the majority of cellular functions, proteome quality control is critical for cellular functionality and is carried out through the curating activity of the proteostasis network (PN). Key components of the PN are the two main degradation machineries, namely the ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways along with several stress-responsive pathways, such as that of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which mobilises cytoprotective genomic responses against oxidative and/or xenobiotic damage. Reportedly, genetic or dietary interventions that activate components of the PN delay ageing in evolutionarily diverse organisms. Natural products (extracts or pure compounds) represent an extraordinary inventory of highly diverse structural scaffolds that offer promising activities towards meeting the challenge of increasing healthspan and/or delaying ageing (e.g., spermidine, quercetin or sulforaphane). Herein, we review those natural compounds that have been found to activate proteostatic and/or anti-stress cellular responses and hence have the potential to delay cellular senescence and/or in vivo ageing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Open AccessReview Therapeutic Potential and Recent Advances of Curcumin in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases
Molecules 2018, 23(4), 835; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23040835
Received: 16 March 2018 / Revised: 29 March 2018 / Accepted: 30 March 2018 / Published: 5 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2179 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Curcumin, a low molecular weight, lipophilic, major yellow natural polyphenolic, and the most well-known plant-derived compound, is extracted from the rhizomes of the turmeric (Curcuma longa) plant. Curcumin has been demonstrated as an effective therapeutic agent in traditional medicine for the
[...] Read more.
Curcumin, a low molecular weight, lipophilic, major yellow natural polyphenolic, and the most well-known plant-derived compound, is extracted from the rhizomes of the turmeric (Curcuma longa) plant. Curcumin has been demonstrated as an effective therapeutic agent in traditional medicine for the treatment and prevention of different diseases. It has also shown a wide range of biological and pharmacological effects in drug delivery, and has actively been used for the treatment of aging-associated diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, ocular diseases, osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney diseases, chronic inflammation and infection. The functional application and therapeutic potential of curcumin in the treatment of aging-associated diseases is well documented in the literature. This review article focuses mainly on the potential role of plant-derived natural compounds such as curcumin, their mechanism of action and recent advances in the treatment of aging-associated diseases. Moreover, the review briefly recaps on the recent progress made in the preparation of nanocurcumins and their therapeutic potential in clinical research for the treatment of aging-associated diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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Other

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Open AccessFeature PaperConcept Paper Novel Natural Products for Healthy Ageing from the Mediterranean Diet and Food Plants of Other Global Sources—The MediHealth Project
Molecules 2018, 23(5), 1097; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23051097
Received: 10 April 2018 / Revised: 23 April 2018 / Accepted: 1 May 2018 / Published: 6 May 2018
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Abstract
There is a rapid increase in the percentage of elderly people in Europe. Consequently, the prevalence of age-related diseases will also significantly increase. Therefore, the main goal of MediHealth, an international research project, is to introduce a novel approach for the discovery of
[...] Read more.
There is a rapid increase in the percentage of elderly people in Europe. Consequently, the prevalence of age-related diseases will also significantly increase. Therefore, the main goal of MediHealth, an international research project, is to introduce a novel approach for the discovery of active agents of food plants from the Mediterranean diet and other global sources that promote healthy ageing. To achieve this goal, a series of plants from the Mediterranean diet and food plants from other origins are carefully selected and subjected to in silico, cell-based, in vivo (fly and mouse models), and metabolism analyses. Advanced analytical techniques complement the bio-evaluation process for the efficient isolation and identification of the bioactive plant constituents. Furthermore, pharmacological profiling of bioactive natural products, as well as the identification and synthesis of their metabolites, is carried out. Finally, optimization studies are performed in order to proceed to the development of innovative nutraceuticals, dietary supplements or herbal medicinal products. The project is based on an exchange of researchers between nine universities and four companies from European and non-European countries, exploiting the existing complementary multidisciplinary expertise. Herein, the unique and novel approach of this interdisciplinary project is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Derived Natural Products and Age Related Diseases)
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