molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Innovative Adsorbents for Pollutant Removal: An Overview of Current Research"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Macromolecular Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (13 January 2022) | Viewed by 5964

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Grégorio Crini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR 6249, UFR Sciences et Techniques, Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25000 Besançon, France
Interests: water pollution; environmental analysis; water purification technologies; wastewater engineering; adsorption processes; polysaccharides; cyclodextrins; bioassays
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Ana Rita Lado Ribeiro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering - Laboratory of Catalysis and Materials (LSRE-LCM), Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: occurrence and distribution of multi-class organic micropollutants in water/wastewater; analytical tools for determination of organic micropollutants; identification of by-products; advanced oxidation processes: membrane technologies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Corina Bradu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
PROTMED Research Centre, Department of Systems Ecology and Sustainability, University of Bucharest, Spl. Independentei 91-95, 050095 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: advanced oxidation processes; adsorption processes; ion-exchange; hydrodechlorination; emerging pollutants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Lorenzo Antonio Picos Corrales
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratorio de Ambiental, Facultad de Ingeniería Culiacán, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Ciudad Universitaria, Culiacán 80013, Sinaloa, Mexico
Interests: synthesis and characterization of polymers; controlled drug delivery; polymeric carriers; water remediation; flocculants and adsorbents; chitosan; stimuli-responsive polymers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Lee D. Wilson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, 110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C9, Canada
Interests: polymers; host–guest chemistry; hydration effects; adsorption phenomena; molecular recognition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, many innovative non-conventional adsorbents based on molecular or macromolecular architectures, of natural or synthetic origin, have been proposed to remove environmental pollutants from water and wastewater via liquid–solid adsorption processes.

These materials are intended to be chemically more efficient, economically viable, simple to use and regenerate, easy to set up on an industrial site, and more environmentally friendly, while trying to fit in with the principles of green chemistry and the circular economy.

The list of adsorbents is particularly vast, including, for example, nanocellulose, cellulose-based hydrogels, cyclodextrin polymers, lignocellulosic resources and organic wastes from agricultural, forestry and pulp industry wastes, lignin-based adsorbents, chitosan-based nanocomposites, calixarene-based polymers, super-chalcogens, molecularly imprinted polymers, modified zeolites, mesoporous silicas, modified pillared clays, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, magnetic layered double hydroxides, metal oxide composites, iron-based hybrid nanomaterials, iron-rich red mud, metal–organic frameworks, geopolymers (inorganic polymers), biochar composites, graphene-based composites, novel structured carbon-based materials, carbon nanotubes, carbonaceous waste from oil refineries, carbon-based aerogels from waste paper, 3D graphene-based adsorbents, carbon xerogels, synthetic hydrogels, ionic-liquid enhanced adsorbents, industrial sludge, adsorbents from stainless steel slag, or plant biomass.

The objective of this Special Issue on “Innovative Adsorbents for Pollutant Removal: An Overview of Current Research” is to review the state of the art and divulge the latest results obtained in the field of non-conventional adsorbents used to remove environmental pollutants such as metals, including rare earth elements, radionucleides and metalloids, fluorides, dyes, pesticides, antibiotics, anti-inflammatory, hormones, synthetic cosmetics ingredients, disinfectants, UV filters, alkylphenols and other surfactants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, plastic nanoparticles, and so on.

We invite colleagues to contribute with original research papers and critical reviews addressing recent progresses on all aspects of innovative adsorbents for removal of water pollutants.

Dr. Grégorio Crini
Dr. Ana Rita Lado Ribeiro
Dr. Corina Bradu
Dr. Lorenzo A. Picos Corrales
Prof. Dr. Lee D. Wilson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Adsorption
  • Agricultural wastes
  • Biomass
  • Biosorption
  • Cosmetics
  • Cyclodextrins polymers
  • Dyes
  • Emerging pollutants
  • Fluorides
  • Forestry residues
  • Hybrid nanomaterials
  • Ionic liquids
  • Metal–organic frameworks
  • Metalloids
  • Metals
  • Microencapsulation
  • Molecular recognition
  • Molecularly imprinted polymers
  • Nanofibers
  • Nanosponges
  • Nanotubes
  • Non-conventional adsorbents
  • Organic contaminants
  • Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances
  • Personal care products
  • Pesticides
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Polysaccharides
  • Radionuclides
  • Rare earth elements
  • Stimuli-responsive polymers
  • Supramolecular chemistry
  • Wastewater treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Temperature Responsive Polymer Conjugate Prepared by “Grafting from” Proteins toward the Adsorption and Removal of Uremic Toxin
Molecules 2022, 27(3), 1051; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27031051 - 03 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 815
Abstract
In this study, temperature-responsive polymer-protein conjugate was synthesized using a “grafting from” concept by introducing a chain transfer agent (CTA) into bovine serum albumin (BSA). The BSA-CTA was used as a starting point for poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) through reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer [...] Read more.
In this study, temperature-responsive polymer-protein conjugate was synthesized using a “grafting from” concept by introducing a chain transfer agent (CTA) into bovine serum albumin (BSA). The BSA-CTA was used as a starting point for poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) through reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The research investigations suggest that the thermally responsive behavior of PNIPAAm was controlled by the monomer ratio to CTA, as well as the amount of CTA introduced to BSA. The study further synthesized the human serum albumin (HSA)-PNIPAAm conjugate, taking the advantage that HSA can specifically adsorb indoxyl sulfate (IS) as a uremic toxin. The HSA-PNIPAAm conjugate could capture IS and decreased the concentration by about 40% by thermal precipitation. It was also revealed that the protein activity was not impaired by the conjugation with PNIPAAm. The proposed strategy is promising in not only removal of uremic toxins but also enrichment of biomarkers for early diagnostic applications. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Use of Chènevotte, a Valuable Co-Product of Industrial Hemp Fiber, as Adsorbent for Pollutant Removal. Part I: Chemical, Microscopic, Spectroscopic and Thermogravimetric Characterization of Raw and Modified Samples
Molecules 2021, 26(15), 4574; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26154574 - 28 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1035
Abstract
FINEAU (2021–2024) is a trans-disciplinary research project involving French, Serbian, Italian, Portuguese and Romanian colleagues, a French agricultural cooperative and two surface-treatment industries, intending to propose chènevotte, a co-product of the hemp industry, as an adsorbent for the removal of pollutants from polycontaminated [...] Read more.
FINEAU (2021–2024) is a trans-disciplinary research project involving French, Serbian, Italian, Portuguese and Romanian colleagues, a French agricultural cooperative and two surface-treatment industries, intending to propose chènevotte, a co-product of the hemp industry, as an adsorbent for the removal of pollutants from polycontaminated wastewater. The first objective of FINEAU was to prepare and characterize chènevotte-based materials. In this study, the impact of water washing and treatments (KOH, Na2CO3 and H3PO4) on the composition and structure of chènevotte (also called hemp shives) was evaluated using chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT), attenuated total reflectance–Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, solid state NMR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that all these techniques are complementary and useful to characterize the structure and morphology of the samples. Before any chemical treatment, the presence of impurities with a compact unfibrillated structure on the surfaces of chènevotte samples was found. Data indicated an increase in the crystallinity index and significant changes in the chemical composition of each sample after treatment as well as in surface morphology and roughness. The most significant changes were observed in alkaline-treated samples, especially those treated with KOH. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
An Overview of Modified Chitosan Adsorbents for the Removal of Precious Metals Species from Aqueous Media
Molecules 2022, 27(3), 978; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27030978 - 01 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 972
Abstract
This mini-review provides coverage of chitosan-based adsorbents and their modified forms as sustainable solid-phase extraction (SPE) materials for precious metal ions, such as gold species, and their complexes in aqueous media. Modified forms of chitosan-based adsorbents range from surface-functionalized systems to biomaterial composites [...] Read more.
This mini-review provides coverage of chitosan-based adsorbents and their modified forms as sustainable solid-phase extraction (SPE) materials for precious metal ions, such as gold species, and their complexes in aqueous media. Modified forms of chitosan-based adsorbents range from surface-functionalized systems to biomaterial composites that contain inorganic or other nanomaterial components. An overview of the SPE conditions such as pH, temperature, contact time, and adsorbent dosage was carried out to outline how these factors affect the efficiency of the sorption process, with an emphasis on gold species. This review provides insight into the structure-property relationships for chitinaceous adsorbents and their metal-ion removal mechanism in aqueous media. Cross-linked chitosan sorbents showed a maximum for Au(III) uptake capacity (600 mg/g), while S-containing cross-linked chitosan display favourable selectivity and uptake capacity with Au(III) species. Compared to industrial adsorbents such as activated carbon, modified chitosan sorbents display favourable uptake of Au(III) species, especially in aqueous media at low pH. In turn, this contribution is intended to catalyze further research directed at the rational design of tailored SPE materials that employ biopolymer scaffolds to yield improved uptake properties of precious metal species in aqueous systems. The controlled removal of gold and precious metal species from aqueous media is highly relevant to sustainable industrial processes and environmental remediation. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review
Recent Improvement Strategies on Metal-Organic Frameworks as Adsorbent, Catalyst, and Membrane for Wastewater Treatment
Molecules 2021, 26(17), 5261; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175261 - 30 Aug 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1638
Abstract
The accumulation of pollutants in water is dangerous for the environment and human lives. Some of them are considered as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that cannot be eliminated from wastewater effluent. Thus, many researchers have devoted their efforts to improving the existing technology [...] Read more.
The accumulation of pollutants in water is dangerous for the environment and human lives. Some of them are considered as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that cannot be eliminated from wastewater effluent. Thus, many researchers have devoted their efforts to improving the existing technology or providing an alternative strategy to solve this environmental problem. One of the attractive materials for this purpose are metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) due to their superior high surface area, high porosity, and the tunable features of their structures and function. This review provides an up-to-date and comprehensive description of MOFs and their crucial role as adsorbent, catalyst, and membrane in wastewater treatment. This study also highlighted several strategies to improve their capability to remove pollutants from water effluent. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop