Special Issue "Structure and Crystallochemistry of Clay Minerals"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystallography and Physical Chemistry of Minerals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ana I. Ruiz
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: structural characterization; clay minerals; clays for pollution control in waste effluents; clays as mineral barriers in the design of waste management
Dr. Jaime Cuevas Rodríguez
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: mineralogy and geochemistry of clay minerals focussed to their characterization in order to address the role of geochemistry of mineral barriers in the design of waste management and residual effluents controls

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Identifying the best applications of clay minerals requires a thorough knowledge of their structure and crystallochemical properties. Clay minerals’ structure consists of aluminosilicate layers (or sheets) in which the fundamental building blocks are composed of tetrahedral and octahedral units. These materials present an enormous structural versatility and capacity to evolve due to interlayer cations, stacking of the layers’ isomorphic substitutions, polymorphous transformations by octahedral cation migration, and other features. These properties influence their behavior in various natural or technical processes.

This Special Issue will focus on the accurate determination of the structural and crystallochemical characteristics of clay minerals, with the aim of better understanding and predict their properties.

Dr. Ana I. Ruiz
Guest Editors
Dr. Jaime Cuevas Rodríguez
Co-Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • clay minerals
  • mixed layers
  • octahedral sheet
  • tetrahedral sheet
  • coupled substitutions
  • redox processes
  • defects and surface properties
  • structural formulae
  • diffraction techniques
  • x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Thermal Evolution of Natural Layered Double Hydroxides: Insight from Quintinite, Hydrotalcite, Stichtite, and Iowaite as Reference Samples for CO3- and Cl-Members of the Hydrotalcite Supergroup
Minerals 2020, 10(11), 961; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10110961 - 28 Oct 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In Situ high-temperature powder X-ray diffraction experiments were undertaken for the coarse crystalline natural layered double hydroxides (LDHs) quintinite, hydrotalcite, stichtite, and iowaite in the temperature range 25–1000 °C, with thermal analyses of these minerals and their annealed forms carried out in parallel. [...] Read more.
In Situ high-temperature powder X-ray diffraction experiments were undertaken for the coarse crystalline natural layered double hydroxides (LDHs) quintinite, hydrotalcite, stichtite, and iowaite in the temperature range 25–1000 °C, with thermal analyses of these minerals and their annealed forms carried out in parallel. In the temperature range from 25 °C to 170–210 °C quintinite, hydrotalcite, and stichtite (carbonate members of the LDH family) demonstrated contraction of the basal d00n-value of 0.1–0.3 Å, followed by a sharp contraction of 1.0–1.1 Å at T > 170–210 °C. The high-temperature modified states were stable up to 380–420 °C, before decomposing to an amorphous phase. Iowaite (chloride member of the family) was stable up to 320 °C and transformed to an amorphous phase at higher temperature. Iowaite experiences continuous contraction of the d00n-value of up to 0.5 Å in the temperature range 25–200 °C, reaching a plateau at a temperature range of 200–320 °C. Assessing the reversibility of thermal transformation shows complete reconstruction of the crystal structure of the hydrotalcite and iowaite heated to 300 °C. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance analysis shows that some Al changes coordination from 6- to 4-fold, synchronously with quintinite transformation to the amorphous phase. All phases transform to periclase and a spinel-type compound upon further heating. Thermal analysis of samples annealed at 125 °C shows that carbonate members do not have a tendency to form dehydrated phases, whereas for iowaite, a dehydrated phase having 0.9 apfu lesser water content as in the initial sample has been obtained. Thermal evolution of LDHs is found to depend on the nature of the interaction of interlayer species and water molecules to H atoms of the metal-hydroxide layer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structure and Crystallochemistry of Clay Minerals)
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