Special Issue "The Role of Minerals in Cultural and Geological Heritage"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystallography and Physical Chemistry of Minerals & Nanominerals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. João Pedro Veiga
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science, CENIMAT/i3N, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, NOVA University of Lisbon, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: Cultural Heritage; Ceramics; Glasses; Mortars; Pigments; Mining Heritage; Mineralogy; Crystallography; Crystal chemistry; Nanomaterials; Nanotechnology; Synchrotron Radiation; X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Mathilda Larsson Coutinho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
HERCULES Laboratory, Institute for Advanced Studies and Research, Universidade de Évora, Largo Marquês de Marialva 8, 7000-809 Évora, Portugal
Interests: cultural heritage; conservation sciences; ceramic; glass, glazes; mineralogy; historical material research; biodeterioration; deterioration processes; conservation-restoration
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Elin Figueiredo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CENIMAT/i3N, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, NOVA University of Lisbon, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: cultural heritage; archaeometallurgy; mineralogy; geological heritage; ancient mining; bronze and tin; conservation sciences
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Minerals, essential raw materials for the development of societies, focuses on the special role of minerals in cultural heritage, either by their application or existence in tangible heritage such as monuments, buildings, works of art, historical artefacts and objects of cultural value, as well as in the natural heritage generated by the geological, mining and industrial structures that are the sources of these raw materials.

The definition of cultural heritage by the council of Europe as a resource inherited from the past which humanity identifies as a reflection and expression of their constantly evolving values, beliefs, knowledge and traditions, thus gains special significance and expression, considering the fundamental role of minerals in the comprehension of properties and behavior of this heritage.

This Special Issue intends to bridge heritage and mineral science, and we encourage all experts working in related areas to submit their contributions. Topics of special interest include but are not limited to glasses, ceramics, metals, stone/rocks and mortars, their properties, behavior, aging, and degradation; historical mining and mining heritage, geoarchaeology, geoheritage and industrial heritage related to mining; historical technological processes, archaeometry, dating and authenticity; characterization techniques, new materials and methodologies, conservation, best practices and case studies; minerals related to mining activity,  rock weathering, soils, valorization of cultural landscape, geo-tourism in historical mining sites and geological sites; monitoring and remote sensing, modelling and theoretical approaches, data management, risk assessment, soil contamination/remediation, acid mine drainage, ecological solutions, maintenance and sustainability; as well as climate impact and social impact.

We look forward for your submissions!

Prof. Dr. João Pedro Veiga
Dr. Mathilda L. Coutinho
Dr. Elin Figueiredo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • glasses, ceramics and metals in cultural heritage
  • stone/rocks and mortars in built heritage
  • minerals and mineralogical phases
  • minerals related to mining sites
  • geological sites
  • non-destructive methodologies
  • large scale facilities (synchrotron, neutron and ion beam)
  • authenticity and dating
  • effects of climate changes
  • modelling and theoretical approaches
  • remote sensing and risk management
  • maintenance and sustainability
  • social impact and cultural tourism

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Assessment and Promotion of Geotouristic and Geomining Routes as a Basis for Local Development: A Case Study
Minerals 2021, 11(4), 351; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11040351 - 28 Mar 2021
Viewed by 431
Abstract
Travel itineraries are fundamental in the development of tourism of a given area. Traditional thematic routes (e.g., architectural, archaeological) can be significantly improved and optimized by including geological and mining interest sites. The present study offers an analysis of the influence that inclusion [...] Read more.
Travel itineraries are fundamental in the development of tourism of a given area. Traditional thematic routes (e.g., architectural, archaeological) can be significantly improved and optimized by including geological and mining interest sites. The present study offers an analysis of the influence that inclusion of geosites or mining sites could have on the existing routes of the Zaruma-Portovelo region (Ecuador), together with a global assessment of these itineraries as the basis of fostering local development in communities of the region. The methodology consists of the following stages: (i) compilation of existing travel itineraries; (ii) analysis and assessment of those geosites and mining sites that are included in two geotouristic routes through the Spanish Inventory of Places of Geological Interest method (IELIG, acronym in Spanish), but have not been assessed previously; (iii) assessment of existing routes (two geotouristic routes and one geomining route) from a global perspective through the Geotouristic Route Assessment Matrix method (GtRAM, acronym in Spanish); and (iv) definition of strategies for the development and promotion of travel itineraries within the context of geotourism. According to the results of quantitative assessment, three new sites (both geosites and mining sites) were studied and their obtained score of interest was “High” (164/400). The existing routes achieved good results both from the geological-mining perspective “High” score of (189/400) and within a global context “Very High” score of (3.5/5). The quantitative assessment allowed us to propose improvement strategies to disseminate and use these itineraries to unfold sustainable development based on geotourism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Minerals in Cultural and Geological Heritage)
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Open AccessArticle
Mineral Inventory of the Algares 30-Level Adit, Aljustrel Mine, Iberian Pyrite Belt, Portugal
Minerals 2020, 10(10), 853; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10100853 - 27 Sep 2020
Viewed by 661
Abstract
Mining activity in Algares (Aljustrel Mine, Portuguese sector of the Iberian Pyrite Belt, IPB) stems prior to Roman times. As the orebody is vertical and relatively thin, mining was carried out mainly along underground adits (galleries). Nowadays, the deposit is considered exhausted and [...] Read more.
Mining activity in Algares (Aljustrel Mine, Portuguese sector of the Iberian Pyrite Belt, IPB) stems prior to Roman times. As the orebody is vertical and relatively thin, mining was carried out mainly along underground adits (galleries). Nowadays, the deposit is considered exhausted and the area is being rehabilitated for a different use. The Algares +30 level adit intersects two volcanic units of the IPB Volcano-Sedimentary Complex. The massive sulphide and related stockwork zone are hosted by the Mine Tuff volcanic unit and are exposed in the walls of the gallery, showing intense hydrothermal alteration. Along the mine adit, the geological sequence is affected by strong oxidation and supergene alteration, giving rise to the formation of secondary minerals through the oxidation of the sulphides. The most common minerals found were melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) and chalcanthite (CuSO4·5H2O), forming essentially massive or crystalline aggregates, ranging from greenish to bluish colours. Melanterite from the walls revealed to be Cu-rich by opposition to that from stalactites/stalagmites formed below the old ore storage silo revealing the low-copper-grade ores exploited underground. The mineralogy of the efflorescent salts was used to ascertain the processes involved in their formation, and moreover, the inventory of minerals is presented, as well as their principal characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Minerals in Cultural and Geological Heritage)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Lavrion Mines: A Unique Site of Geological and Mineralogical Heritage
Minerals 2021, 11(1), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11010076 - 14 Jan 2021
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Abstract
The Lavrion area corresponds to the western part of the Attic-Cycladic metamorphic belt, in the back-arc region of the active Hellenic subduction zone. Between the Eocene and the Miocene, metamorphic rocks (mainly marbles and schists) underwent several stages of metamorphism and deformation due [...] Read more.
The Lavrion area corresponds to the western part of the Attic-Cycladic metamorphic belt, in the back-arc region of the active Hellenic subduction zone. Between the Eocene and the Miocene, metamorphic rocks (mainly marbles and schists) underwent several stages of metamorphism and deformation due to collision and collapse of the Cycladic belt. Exhumation during the Miocene was accommodated by the movement of a large-scale detachment fault system, which also enhanced emplacement of magmatic rocks, leading to the formation of the famous Lavrion silver deposits. The area around the mines shows the stacking of nappes, with ore deposition mainly localized within the marbles, at marble-schist contacts, below, within, or above the detachment. The Lavrion deposit comprises five genetically-related but different styles of mineralization, a feature never observed in another ore deposit elsewhere, containing the highest number of different elements of any known mining district. The local geology, tectonic, and magmatic activity were fundamental factors in determining how and when the mineralization formed. Other key factors, such as the rise and the fall of sea level, which resulted from climate change over the last million years, were also of major importance for the subsequent surface oxidation at Lavrion that created an unmatched diversity of secondary minerals. As a result, the Lavrion deposit contains 638 minerals of which Lavrion is type-locality for 23 of them, which is nearly 12% of all known species. Apart from being famous for its silver exploitation, this mining district contains more minerals than any other district on Earth. The unique geological, mineralogical, and educational (mining, archaeological, and environmental) features suggest that it is highly suitable to be developed as a future UNESCO Global Geopark. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Minerals in Cultural and Geological Heritage)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Trace of Iron Mining in Poland

Wrona Paweł, Rózański Zenon, Pach Grzegorz, and Niewiadomski Adam
Silesian University of Technology, Poland

The article presents the history of the exploitation of iron ore deposits in Poland and its impact on the development of the surrounding areas. The types and locations of the deposits were characterized as well as the techniques used for their mining. The importance of obtaining iron ore in the development of regions has been described for the most important iron ore centres formed in today's Poland: Świętokrzyskie Mountains region, Lower Silesia, and Częstochowa - Zawiercie area. In the Świętokrzyskie Mountains region, mining dates back to the so-called Roman times, while in the Częstochowa - Zawiercie region, iron was mined between the 14th and 20th centuries.

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