Special Issue "High-Tech Critical Metals: Evaluation and Deposit Models"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Deposits".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Yasushi Watanabe

Graduate School of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Akita 010-8502, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: critical metals; deposit model; resource potential; unconventional resource source; rare earth elements; cobalt; nickel; graphite; lithium; galium; germanium; magnesite

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Our society is dramatically changing to improve daily life, with minimizing the impacts on environment, so that it is more comfortable and convenient. It is exemplified by the fact that many countries are aiming to rapidly replace gasoline and diesel vehicles with electric ones, and this causes new demands for minor metals/minerals, such as rare earths, cobalt, lithium, graphite, etc. However, resource potentials/reserves, geological deposit models, and the extraction technology of these metals and minerals have not been well investigated, and the mining sectors have to struggle to supply these materials. Although the distribution of such critical metals and minerals is highly heterogeneous around the world, and their production is commonly limited to a few places, enormous mineral potentials remain in green fields where they have not been well explored. In this Special Issue, we would like to invite papers that deal with geological models and case studies of critical metals/minerals ore deposits to provide insights for metallurgists, developers and material users.

Prof. Yasushi Watanabe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Deposit model
  • Resource potential
  • Unconventional source
  • Critical metals
  • Rare earth elements
  • Cobalt
  • Nickel
  • Graphite
  • Lithium
  • Galium
  • Magnesite

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Chemical Characteristics of Zircon from Khaldzan Burgedei Peralkaline Complex, Western Mongolia
Minerals 2019, 9(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9010010
Received: 5 October 2018 / Revised: 15 December 2018 / Accepted: 21 December 2018 / Published: 24 December 2018
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Abstract
The Khaldzan Burgedei peralkaline complex is one of the potential rare metal (Zr–Nb–REE) deposits in Mongolia. The complex consists mainly of quartz syenite and granite, and zircon is the most common accessory mineral in the rocks. Based on texture and mineral paragenesis, zircon [...] Read more.
The Khaldzan Burgedei peralkaline complex is one of the potential rare metal (Zr–Nb–REE) deposits in Mongolia. The complex consists mainly of quartz syenite and granite, and zircon is the most common accessory mineral in the rocks. Based on texture and mineral paragenesis, zircon is classified into three types. Type-I zircons in the quartz syenite and granite are generally isolated and euhedral to subhedral, 25–100 μm in size, enclosed by albite, K-feldspar, and quartz. Type-II zircons occur as subhedral to euhedral 20–150 μm grains, with quartz, and fluorite in the metasomatized zone in the quartz syenite as well as an upper part of the granite near the contact with the quartz syenite. These zircons contain porous core parts (Type-I) or remnants of corroded xenotime-(Y) and synchysite-(Ce). Type-III zircons are observed in the hydrothermally altered zone in quartz syenite and pegmatite. These zircons are anhedral, fine-grained, 10–30 μm in size, and occur in amphibole pseudomorphs which were replaced by quartz, fluorite, chlorite, and hematite. Laser Raman spectra show that Type-I and Type-II zircons contain high amounts of water. Among these, three types of zircons, Type-II zircons are most enriched in REE, Nb, and Th. The texture and composition of the three types of zircons indicate that Type-I, Type-II, and Type-III zircons are magmatic, metasomatic and late hydrothermal in origin, respectively, and they experienced remobilization and recrystallization during the transition from a magmatic to a hydrothermal system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Tech Critical Metals: Evaluation and Deposit Models)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Kriging Interpolation for Evaluating the Mineral Resources of Cobalt-Rich Crusts on Magellan Seamounts
Minerals 2018, 8(9), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8090374
Received: 9 July 2018 / Revised: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 29 August 2018
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Abstract
The evaluation of mineral resources on seamounts by geostatistics faces two key challenges. First, the conventional distance/orientation- and the simple distance-based variogram functions used are ineffective at expressing the spatial self-correlation and continuity of cobalt-rich crust thicknesses on seamounts. Second, the sampling stations [...] Read more.
The evaluation of mineral resources on seamounts by geostatistics faces two key challenges. First, the conventional distance/orientation- and the simple distance-based variogram functions used are ineffective at expressing the spatial self-correlation and continuity of cobalt-rich crust thicknesses on seamounts. Second, the sampling stations used for a single seamount are generally very sparsely distributed because of the high survey costs, which results in an insufficient number of information points for variogram fitting. Here, we present an alternative geostatistical method that uses distance/gradient- and distance/relative-depth-based variograms to process data collected from several neighboring seamounts, allowing the variogram fitting. The application example reported for the Magellan seamounts demonstrates the suitability of the method for evaluating the mineral resources of cobalt-rich crusts. The method could be effective also for the analysis of surface data obtained from mountain slopes on land (e.g., soil). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Tech Critical Metals: Evaluation and Deposit Models)
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