Special Issue "Clays and Micro-Organisms: From Nature to Industry"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Mineralogy and Biogeochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jinwook Kim

Department of Earth System Sciences, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: microbe-mineral interaction; extreme einvrionments; Fe-liberation, smectite-to-illite reaction; diagenesis; petrophysical properties

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Clays and clay materials are important components in natural environments, as well as in industrial applications. Clays and clay minerals are important components in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks, and they undergo biotic and abiotic reactions in natural environments, including extreme environments. These mineral reactions impact a number of geological and environmental processes, such as sediment diagenesis, colloid transport, the mobility and the ultimate fate of organic and inorganic contaminants, integrity of waste repositories, and stability of the ocean floor. Furthermore, the science and technologies of industrial clays, including exploration and clay resource development, particle engineering from macro to nano, chemical and physical modification of industrial application and sustainable resource development are currently being investigated. We invite contributions on, but not limited to, microscopic/spectroscopic/geochemistry studies of clay mineral reactions at both laboratory and field scales. We especially encourage papers on the development of novel methods and/or novel applications of existing techniques with an interdisciplinary perspective.

The first round of submission deadline was 15 January 2019.

Prof. Dr. Jinwook Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Clays
  • Biotic clay reaction
  • Abiotic clay reaction
  • Diagenesis
  • Microbial interaction
  • Extreme environments
  • Geological process
  • Environmental process
  • Industrial clay
  • Physical modification of clays

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Microbial Communities Associated with Ceramic Raw Materials as Potential Contributors for the Improvement of Ceramic Rheological Properties
Minerals 2019, 9(5), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9050316
Received: 29 March 2019 / Revised: 16 May 2019 / Accepted: 20 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
PDF Full-text (3731 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Technical ceramics are being widely employed in the electric power, medical and engineering industries because of their thermal and mechanical properties, as well as their high resistance qualities. The manufacture of technical ceramic components involves complex processes, including milling and stirring of raw [...] Read more.
Technical ceramics are being widely employed in the electric power, medical and engineering industries because of their thermal and mechanical properties, as well as their high resistance qualities. The manufacture of technical ceramic components involves complex processes, including milling and stirring of raw materials in aqueous solutions, spray drying and dry pressing. In general, the spray-dried powders exhibit an important degree of variability in their performance when subjected to dry-pressing, which affects the efficiency of the manufacturing process. Commercial additives, such as deflocculants, biocides, antifoam agents, binders, lubricants and plasticizers are thus applied to ceramic slips. Several bacterial and fungal species naturally occurring in ceramic raw materials, such as Sphingomonas, Aspergillus and Aureobasidium, are known to produce exopolysaccharides. These extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) may confer unique and potentially interesting properties on ceramic slips, including viscosity control, gelation, and flocculation. In this study, the microbial communities present in clay raw materials were identified by both culture methods and DNA-based analyses to select potential EPS producers based on the scientific literature for further assays based on the use of EPS for enhancing the performance of technical ceramics. Potential exopolysaccharide producers were identified in all samples, such as Sphingomonas sp., Pseudomonas xanthomarina, P. stutzeri, P. koreensis, Acinetobacter lwoffi, Bacillus altitudinis and Micrococcus luteus, among bacteria. Five fungi (Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, Acremonium persicinum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa) were also identified as potential EPS producers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clays and Micro-Organisms: From Nature to Industry)
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Open AccessArticle
Clay Mineralogical Characteristics of Sediments Deposited during the Late Quaternary in the Larsen Ice Shelf B Embayment, Antarctica
Minerals 2019, 9(3), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9030153
Received: 21 January 2019 / Revised: 21 February 2019 / Accepted: 27 February 2019 / Published: 3 March 2019
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Abstract
Variations in grain size, clay mineral composition, and stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) are closely linked to the sedimentary facies that reflect mineralogical and geochemical modification during the retreat and advance of the Larsen ice shelf. A whole round [...] Read more.
Variations in grain size, clay mineral composition, and stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) are closely linked to the sedimentary facies that reflect mineralogical and geochemical modification during the retreat and advance of the Larsen ice shelf. A whole round core of marine sediment (EAP13-GC17, 236 cm below the sea floor) was collected on the northwestern Larsen B embayment of the Antarctic Peninsula during a marine geological expedition (the ARA13 Cruise Expedition by the Korea Polar Research Institute, 2013). Four sedimentary facies (U1–U4) were clearly distinguishable: bioturbated sandy mud (open marine, U1), laminated sandy mud (sub–floating ice shelf, U2), sandy clay aggregates (deglacial, U3), and muddy diamictons (sub-glacial, U4), as well as interbedded silty. Clay minerals, including smectite, chlorite, illite, and kaolinite, were detected throughout the core. An increase in the clay mineral ratio of smectite/(illite + chlorite) was clearly observed in the open marine condition, which was strongly indicated by both a heavier isotopic composition of δ13C and δ15N (−24.4‰ and 4.3‰, respectively), and an abrupt increase in 10Be concentration (~30 times). An increase in the average values of the crystal packet thickness of illite (~1.5 times) in U1 also indicated sediments transported in open marine conditions. Based on the clay mineral composition in U1, the sediments are likely to have been transported from the Weddell Sea. The clay mineralogical assessments conducted in this region have significant implications for our understanding of paleodepositional environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clays and Micro-Organisms: From Nature to Industry)
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