Special Issue "Pulsed Laser Micromachining"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "D:Materials and Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. M. Cather Simpson
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics & School of Chemical Sciences, The Photon Factory, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Interests: pulsed laser micromachining; beam and pulse shaping; ultrafast spectroscopy; photonic device R&D; photonics in the primary industries

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Almost since its invention, the laser has been used to cut and process materials—everything from dielectrics and metals to polymers and biomaterials. Laser micromachining offers significant advantages over many mechanical machining methods, mostly in processing quality and allowing ever smaller, more precise features. The advent of ultrashort pulsed lasers, with pulse durations on or faster than the ~1 picosecond time frame for coupling between electrons and phonons, opened a new regime of laser micromachining and microprocessing. The fundamental physics of this ultrashort pulse laser ablation process is fascinating, and not yet fully understood. From a practical standpoint, these ultrashort pulses have been heralded for their ability to “cold cut” and reduce or eliminate the heat-affected zone around the ablation feature. The microprecision and feature quality can be extraordinarily good. Unfortunately, the limited energy carried by each ultrashort pulse means that micromachining with ultrashort pulses can be very slow—currently too slow for most industrial applications. This Special Issue will explore the current state-of-the-art in understanding and applying pulsed lasers to micromachine materials and to micro- and nanoprocess their surfaces. Contributions that explore fundamental mechanistic understandings for all pulse regimes as well as those that discuss applications will be welcomed. The topics to be covered include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Pulsed laser micromachining
  • Femtosecond laser micromachining
  • Picosecond laser micromachining
  • Nanosecond laser micromachining
  • CW laser micromachining
  • Mechanism of laser ablation
  • Laser ablation efficiency
  • Micromachining with pulse bursts
  • Micromachining with spatially-shaped beams
  • Laser micropatterning
  • Laser nanopatterning

Prof. M. Cather Simpson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Micromachining of High Quality PMN–31%PT Single Crystals for High-Frequency (>20 MHz) Ultrasonic Array Transducer Applications
Micromachines 2020, 11(5), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11050512 - 19 May 2020
Abstract
A decrease of piezoelectric properties in the fabrication of ultra-small Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)–x%PbTiO3 (PMN–x%PT) for high-frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasonic array transducers remains an urgent problem. Here, PMN–31%PT with micron-sized kerfs and high piezoelectric performance was micromachined using [...] Read more.
A decrease of piezoelectric properties in the fabrication of ultra-small Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)–x%PbTiO3 (PMN–x%PT) for high-frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasonic array transducers remains an urgent problem. Here, PMN–31%PT with micron-sized kerfs and high piezoelectric performance was micromachined using a 355 nm laser. We studied the kerf profile as a function of laser parameters, revealing that micron-sized kerfs with designated profiles and fewer micro-cracks can be obtained by optimizing the laser parameters. The domain morphology of micromachined PMN–31%PT was thoroughly analyzed to validate the superior piezoelectric performance maintained near the kerfs. A high piezoresponse of the samples after micromachining was also successfully demonstrated by determining the effective piezoelectric coefficient (d33*~1200 pm/V). Our results are promising for fabricating superior PMN–31%PT and other piezoelectric high-frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasonic array transducers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pulsed Laser Micromachining)
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