Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 2nd International Conference on Microfluidic Handling Systems"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Peter Koltay

1. Laboratory for MEMS Applications, IMTEK, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg, Germany
2. BioFluidix GmbH, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg, Germany
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Joost Lötters

1 Integrated Devices and Systems (IDS), MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
2 Bronkhorst High-Tech BV, Nijverheidsstraat 1A, 7261 AK Ruurlo, The Netherlands
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Interests: Design, modelling, fabrication and application of microfluidic handling systems, including MEMS thermal and Coriolis flow sensors and controllers, MEMS pressure sensors, MEMS control valves and micromachined flow analysis sytems such as multiparameter flow measurement systems and micro Wobbe index meters
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gerald A. Urban

Sensor Technology, IMTEK, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Georges Koehler Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microbiosensorarrays; lab-on-chip; electrophoresis on chip; thermal MEMS; nanostructured surfaces; biocompatible surfaces; biomedical in-vivo sensors; immunochips; RNA-analytics on chip

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue will publish selected papers from the 2nd International Conference on Microfluidic Handling Systems (http://www.mfhs2014.uni-freiburg.de/), 8–10 October 2014, Freiburg, Germany. Manuscripts submitted to the journal of Micromachines should be extended by at least 40% compared with the conference one.

Worldwide, accurate handling—i.e., analysis, dosage, measurement and control—of small and extremely small mass flow rates of both gases and liquids is becoming more and more important, driven by numerous applications. Examples of economically and societally relevant applications are, e.g., improvement of medical infusion pump systems, increasing the efficiency of processes that extract oil from oil wells (enhanced oil recovery), systems that measure the energy content (calorific value or Wobbe Index) of natural gas and biogas, monitoring of ground water pollution and the production of pharmaceuticals by means of flow chemistry.

Whether in analytical instrumentation, flow chemistry, energy, semiconductor industry, food and beverage or life sciences, microfluidic handling systems are facing 3 major trends: (1) accurate measurement and calibration facilities, (2) complete functional systems rather than individual components, e.g. flow analysis systems, and flow dosage systems, and (3) commercialisation of research. In the future, the impact of this field of research may become bigger, and large target markets may potentially arise, especially when spin-off companies start manufacturing and selling their products, systems or pilot plants.

The 2nd International Conference on Microfluidic Handling Systems (MFHS 2014) focuses mainly on the technology, components, devices and systems that enable the application in microfluidic systems. We invite submission of papers on systems and devices for accurate handling (e.g., dosing, measurement and control) of (extremely) small mass flow rates of both gases and liquids, and corresponding measurement and control principles:

  • Thermal, ultrasonic and Coriolis principles for flow measurement
  • The piezo-electric, electromagnetic and electrostatic principles for flow control
  • Electronic instrumentation
  • Application proposals
  • Innovative methods in calibration equipment and methodology
  • Micro- and nanomachining
  • Device characterization

The topics include but are not limited to:

  • Sensors: flow, pressure, viscosity, temperature, conductivity, heat capacity, density
  • Actuators: valves, pumps, mixers, droplet generators
  • Interfaces: electronic instrumentation, interconnections, assembly, technology
  • Fluidic control systems: mass flow controllers, precision mixing, dosing and dispensing, calibration
  • Applications: gas chromatographs, liquid chromatographs, medical analyses, micro reaction systems, bio-analytical systems

Dr. Peter Koltay
Dr. Joost Lötters
Prof. Dr. Gerald A. Urban
Conference Co-Chairs
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Cell Size Discrimination Based on the Measurement of the Equilibrium Velocity in Rectangular Microchannels
Micromachines 2015, 6(5), 634-647; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi6050634
Received: 31 December 2014 / Accepted: 19 May 2015 / Published: 22 May 2015
PDF Full-text (6344 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Flow cytometry is a well-established diagnostic tool for cell counting and characterization. It utilizes fluorescence and scattered excitation light simultaneously emitted from cells passing an excitation laser focus to discriminate various cell types and estimate cell size. Here, we apply the principle of
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Flow cytometry is a well-established diagnostic tool for cell counting and characterization. It utilizes fluorescence and scattered excitation light simultaneously emitted from cells passing an excitation laser focus to discriminate various cell types and estimate cell size. Here, we apply the principle of spatially modulated emission (SME) to fluorescently stained SUP-B15 cells as a model system for cancer cells and Marinococcus luteus as model for bacteria. We demonstrate that the experimental apparatus is able to detect these model cells and that the results are comparable to those obtained by a commercially available CASY® TT Counter. Furthermore, by examining the velocity distribution of the cells, we observe clear relationships between cell condition/size and cell velocity. Thus, the cell velocity provides information comparable to the scatter signal in conventional flow cytometry. These results indicate that the SME technique is a promising method for simultaneous cell counting and viability characterization. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Nano-Workbench: A Combined Hollow AFM Cantilever and Robotic Manipulator
Micromachines 2015, 6(5), 600-610; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi6050600
Received: 6 March 2015 / Revised: 4 May 2015 / Accepted: 7 May 2015 / Published: 13 May 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7169 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
To manipulate liquid matter at the nanometer scale, we have developed a robotic assembly equipped with a hollow atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever that can handle femtolitre volumes of liquid. The assembly consists of four independent robots, each sugar cube sized with four
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To manipulate liquid matter at the nanometer scale, we have developed a robotic assembly equipped with a hollow atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever that can handle femtolitre volumes of liquid. The assembly consists of four independent robots, each sugar cube sized with four degrees of freedom. All robots are placed on a single platform around the sample forming a nano-workbench (NWB). Each robot can travel the entire platform and has a minimum position resolution of 5 nm both in-plane and out-of-plane. The cantilever chip was glued to the robotic arm. Dispensing was done by the capillarity between the substrate and the cantilever tip, and was monitored visually through a microscope. To evaluate the performance of the NWB, we have performed three experiments: clamping of graphene with epoxy, mixing of femtolitre volume droplets to synthesize gold nanoparticles and accurately dispense electrolyte liquid for a nanobattery. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Low Flow Liquid Calibration Setup
Micromachines 2015, 6(4), 473-486; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi6040473
Received: 27 February 2015 / Revised: 16 April 2015 / Accepted: 17 April 2015 / Published: 22 April 2015
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Abstract
This article describes a primary calibration setup, and its uncertainty, for low flow liquid calibrations at Bronkhorst High-Tech. It will be used to calibrate reference flow meters from 1 to 200 g/h. By setting up an uncertainty budget for this setup, the calibration
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This article describes a primary calibration setup, and its uncertainty, for low flow liquid calibrations at Bronkhorst High-Tech. It will be used to calibrate reference flow meters from 1 to 200 g/h. By setting up an uncertainty budget for this setup, the calibration of the instruments can be compared to that of NMI’s (National Metrology Institutes). The uncertainty budget consists of mass, time and mass flow uncertainties/corrections that need to be taken in to account for determining the traceable mass flow. Tests results of different flow meters/actuators measured on the setup support the calculated uncertainty. By participating in an intercomparison with NMI’s the measurement and uncertainty of this setup is traceable to European NMI’s. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Multi Parameter Flow Meter for On-Line Measurement of Gas Mixture Composition
Micromachines 2015, 6(4), 452-461; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi6040452
Received: 2 March 2015 / Revised: 25 March 2015 / Accepted: 31 March 2015 / Published: 10 April 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2897 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper we describe the development of a system and model to analyze the composition of gas mixtures up to four components. The system consists of a Coriolis mass flow sensor, density, pressure and thermal flow sensor. With this system it is
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In this paper we describe the development of a system and model to analyze the composition of gas mixtures up to four components. The system consists of a Coriolis mass flow sensor, density, pressure and thermal flow sensor. With this system it is possible to measure the viscosity, density, heat capacity and flow rate of the medium. In a next step the composition can be analyzed if the constituents of the mixture are known. This makes the approach universally applicable to all gasses as long as the number of components does not exceed the number of measured properties and as long as the properties are measured with a sufficient accuracy. We present measurements with binary and ternary gas mixtures, on compositions that range over an order of magnitude in value for the physical properties. Two platforms for analyses are presented. The first platform consists of sensors realized with MEMS fabrication technology. This approach allows for a system with a high level of integration. With this system we demonstrate a proof of principle for the analyses of binary mixtures with an accuracy of 10%. In the second platform we utilize more mature steel sensor technology to demonstrate the potential of this approach. We show that with this technique, binary mixtures can be measured within 1% and ternary gas mixtures within 3%. Full article
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Open AccessArticle 3D Printed Unibody Lab-on-a-Chip: Features Survey and Check-Valves Integration
Micromachines 2015, 6(4), 437-451; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi6040437
Received: 6 February 2015 / Revised: 31 March 2015 / Accepted: 2 April 2015 / Published: 7 April 2015
Cited by 26 | PDF Full-text (5300 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The unibody lab-on-a-chip (ULOC) concept entails a fast and affordable micro-prototyping system built around a single monolithic 3D printed element (unibody). A consumer-grade stereo lithography (SL) 3D printer can configure ULOCs with different forms of sample delivery, transport, handling and readout, while minimizing
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The unibody lab-on-a-chip (ULOC) concept entails a fast and affordable micro-prototyping system built around a single monolithic 3D printed element (unibody). A consumer-grade stereo lithography (SL) 3D printer can configure ULOCs with different forms of sample delivery, transport, handling and readout, while minimizing material costs and fabrication time. ULOC centralizes all complex fabrication procedures and replaces the need for clean room resources, delivering prototypes for less than 1 US$, which can be printed in 10 min and ready for testing in less than 30 min. Recent examples of ULOC integration of transport, chemical sensing for optical readout and flow mixing capabilities are discussed, as well as the integration of the first check-valves for ULOC devices. ULOC valves are strictly unidirectional up to 100 psi, show an exponential forward flow behavior up to 70 psi and can be entirely fabricated with the ULOC approach. Full article
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Open AccessArticle A Disposable Dispensing Valve for Non-Contact Microliter Applications in a 96-Well Plate Format
Micromachines 2015, 6(4), 423-436; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi6040423
Received: 27 February 2015 / Revised: 30 March 2015 / Accepted: 30 March 2015 / Published: 3 April 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1684 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We present a miniaturized, disposable, normally-closed electromagnetic dispensing valve for the microliter range to process 96-well plates. The novel injection-molded valve is designed to fit into a 9 mm grid to realize an eight channel dispensing head, enabling the serial processing of well
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We present a miniaturized, disposable, normally-closed electromagnetic dispensing valve for the microliter range to process 96-well plates. The novel injection-molded valve is designed to fit into a 9 mm grid to realize an eight channel dispensing head, enabling the serial processing of well plates row-by-row. The presented dispensing valve design originates from a miniaturization study of a previously developed functional model. The outer diameter of the valve, including all actuating components, was reduced by 8 mm to an overall diameter of 8.5 mm without compromising the performance. Additionally, the actuation current of the valve could be reduced to 5 A. The valve is characterized for a volume range between 840 nL and 5.3 μL. The performance of the injection molded valve is competitive to commercially available dispensing valves, featuring the advantages of low fabrication costs, disposability, low mounting size, easy handling, and super silent actuation. Full article
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