Special Issue "Trends in Plasticity of Metals and Alloys"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mikhaïl A. Lebyodkin
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Microstructures and Materials Mechanics (LEM3), Université de Lorraine, CNRS, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, F-57000 Metz, France
Interests: self-organization phenomena in plasticity; plastic instabilities; metal alloys; relationships between mechanical and physical (magnetic, electronic) properties
Dr. Vincent Taupin
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Microstructures and Materials Mechanics (LEM3), Université de Lorraine, CNRS, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, F-57000 Metz, France
Interests: multiscale modeling of plasticity and interfaces in crystals; dislocations; disclinations; grain boundaries; size effects; strain hardening

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last few decades have seen a considerable progress in the development of high performance metals and alloys that have microstructures and plastic behaviors with a high level of complexity. Ultrafine-grain materials, high-entropy alloys, and metallic glasses have been the focus of research and are gaining a place in the industry. Concurrently, the collective, heterogeneous, and self-organized nature of plastic deformation, manifesting itself on mesoscopic scales, has been generally recognized. Such progress demanded the development of advanced multiscale modeling frameworks (Ab-Initio, molecular dynamics, discrete dislocation dynamics, strain gradient models, etc.), experimental characterization tools (in-situ TEM, DIC, nanoindentation, micropillar testing, etc.) and analyses of the observed and simulated complex spatiotemporal behaviors, which aim at establishing process–microstructure–property links and bridging gaps from the elementary atomic-scale mechanism, up to the laboratory sample dimension. Progress in the field of plasticity of metals and alloys keeps growing fast and new materials are constantly being developed, concurrently with the emergence of modern processing routes. In parallel, considerable advances are made in the characterization and modeling of microstructures, with an emphasis on setting up a synergy between theoretical and experimental methods. This Special Issue aims at synthetizing recent progress and trends in the area of plasticity of metals and alloys, with a focus on:

  • New approaches to old questions and traditional model materials, to get a deeper understanding of physical mechanisms;
  • New materials and processing routes (high entropy alloys, metallic glasses, severe plastic deformation, additive manufacturing, etc.);
  • Multiscale modeling (atomistic models, discrete dislocation dynamics, strain gradient models, homogenization models, etc.);
  • Experimental characterization methods (HR-DIC, 3D-EBSD, HR-TEM, ECCI, TKD, etc.).

Dr. Mikhaïl A. Lebyodkin
Dr. Vincent Taupin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metals
  • Alloys
  • Mechanisms of plasticity
  • Microstructure design
  • Novel metallic materials
  • Novel processes
  • Advanced characterization methods
  • Multi-scale experiment and modeling
  • Collective behavior of defects

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Scaling in the Local Strain-Rate Field during Jerky Flow in an Al-3%Mg Alloy
Metals 2020, 10(1), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10010134 - 16 Jan 2020
Abstract
Jerky flow in alloys, or the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect, presents an outstanding example of self-organization phenomena in plasticity. Recent acoustic emission investigations revealed that its microscopic dynamics is governed by scale invariance manifested as power-law statistics of intermittent events. As the macroscopic stress [...] Read more.
Jerky flow in alloys, or the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect, presents an outstanding example of self-organization phenomena in plasticity. Recent acoustic emission investigations revealed that its microscopic dynamics is governed by scale invariance manifested as power-law statistics of intermittent events. As the macroscopic stress serrations show both scale invariance and characteristic scales, the micro-macro transition is an intricate question requiring an assessment of intermediate behaviors. The first attempt of such an investigation is undertaken in the present paper by virtue of a one-dimensional (1D) local extensometry technique and statistical analysis of time series. The data obtained complete the missing link and bear evidence to a coexistence of characteristic large events and power laws for smaller events. The scale separation is interpreted in terms of the phenomena of self-organized criticality and synchronization in complex systems. Furthermore, it is found that both the stress serrations and local strain-rate bursts agree with the so-called fluctuation scaling related to general mathematical laws and unifying various specific mechanisms proposed to explain scale invariance in diverse systems. Prospects of further investigations including the duality manifested by a wavy spatial organization of the local bursts of plastic deformation are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Plasticity of Metals and Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle
Ductile Compressive Behavior of Biomedical Alloys
Metals 2020, 10(1), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10010060 - 29 Dec 2019
Abstract
The mechanical properties of ductile metals are generally assessed by means of tensile testing. Compression testing of metal alloys is usually only applied for brittle materials, or if the available specimen size is limited (e.g., in micro indentation). In the present study a [...] Read more.
The mechanical properties of ductile metals are generally assessed by means of tensile testing. Compression testing of metal alloys is usually only applied for brittle materials, or if the available specimen size is limited (e.g., in micro indentation). In the present study a previously developed test procedure for compressive testing was applied to determine the elastic properties and the yield curves of different biomedical alloys, such as 316L (two different batches), Ti-6Al-7Nb, and Co-28Cr-6Mo. The results were compared and validated against data from tensile testing. The converted flow curves for true stress vs. logarithmic strain of the compressive samples coincided well up to the yield strength of the tensile samples. The developed compression test method was shown to be reliable and valid, and it can be applied in cases where only small material batches are available, e.g., from additive manufacturing. Nevertheless, a certain yield asymmetry was observed with one of the tested 316L stainless steel alloys and the Co-28Cr-6Mo. Possible hypotheses and explanations for this yield asymmetry are given in the discussion section. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Plasticity of Metals and Alloys)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Understanding the Interdependence of Penetration Depth and Deformation on Nanoindentation of Nanoporous Silver
Metals 2019, 9(12), 1346; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9121346 - 14 Dec 2019
Abstract
A silver-based nanoporous material was produced by dealloying (selective chemical etching) of an Ag38.75Cu38.75Si22.5 crystalline alloy. Composed of connected ligaments, this material was imaged using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and focused ion-beam (FIB) scanning electron microscope tomography. [...] Read more.
A silver-based nanoporous material was produced by dealloying (selective chemical etching) of an Ag38.75Cu38.75Si22.5 crystalline alloy. Composed of connected ligaments, this material was imaged using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and focused ion-beam (FIB) scanning electron microscope tomography. Its mechanical behavior was evaluated using nanoindentation and found to be heterogeneous, with density variation over a length scale of a few tens of nanometers, similar to the indent size. This technique proved relevant to the investigation of a material’s mechanical strength, as well as to how its behavior related to the material’s microstructure. The hardness is recorded as a function of the indent depth and a phenomenological description based on strain gradient and densification kinetic was proposed to describe the resultant depth dependence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Plasticity of Metals and Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle
Modeling the Strain-Range Dependent Cyclic Hardening of SS304 and 08Ch18N10T Stainless Steel with a Memory Surface
Metals 2019, 9(8), 832; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9080832 - 26 Jul 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper deals with the development of a cyclic plasticity model suitable for predicting the strain range-dependent behavior of austenitic steels. The proposed cyclic plasticity model uses the virtual back-stress variable corresponding to a cyclically-stable material under strain control. This new internal variable [...] Read more.
This paper deals with the development of a cyclic plasticity model suitable for predicting the strain range-dependent behavior of austenitic steels. The proposed cyclic plasticity model uses the virtual back-stress variable corresponding to a cyclically-stable material under strain control. This new internal variable is defined by means of a memory surface introduced in the stress space. The linear isotropic hardening rule is also superposed. First, the proposed model was validated on experimental data published for the SS304 material (Kang et al., Constitutive modeling of strain range dependent cyclic hardening. Int J Plast 19 (2003) 1801–1819). Subsequently, the proposed cyclic plasticity model was applied to our own experimental data from uniaxial tests realized on 08Ch18N10T at room temperature. The new cyclic plasticity model can be calibrated by the relatively simple fitting procedure that is described in the paper. A comparison between the results of a numerical simulation and the results of real experiments demonstrates the robustness of the proposed approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Plasticity of Metals and Alloys)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Dynamic Steady State by Unlimited Unidirectional Plastic Deformation of Crystalline Materials Deforming by Dislocation Glide at Low to Moderate Temperatures
Metals 2020, 10(1), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10010066 - 01 Jan 2020
Abstract
This paper presents an outline of the quest for the mechanical steady state that an unlimited unidirectional plastic strain applied at low to moderate temperature is presumed to develop in single-phase crystalline materials deforming by dislocation glide, with particular emphasis on its athermal [...] Read more.
This paper presents an outline of the quest for the mechanical steady state that an unlimited unidirectional plastic strain applied at low to moderate temperature is presumed to develop in single-phase crystalline materials deforming by dislocation glide, with particular emphasis on its athermal strength limit. Fifty years ago, the study of crystalline plasticity was focused on the strain range covered by tensile tests, i.e., on true strains less than unity; the canonic stress–strain behavior was the succession of stages I, II, and III, the latter supposedly leading to a steady state defining a temperature and strain rate-dependent flow stress limit. The experimentally available strain range was increased up to Von Mises equivalent strains as high as 10 by the extensive use of torsion tests or by combinations of intermittent deformations by wire drawing or rolling with tensile tests during the 1970s. The assumed exhaustion of the strain-hardening rate was not verified; new deformation stages, IV and V, were proposed, and the predicted strength limit for deformed materials was nearly doubled. Since the advent of severe plastic deformation techniques in the 1980s, such a range was still significantly augmented. Strains of the order of several hundreds were routinely reached, but former conclusions relative to the limit of the flow stress were not substantially changed. However, very recently, the plastic strain range has allegedly been expanded to 105 true strain units by using torsion under high pressure (HPT), surprisingly for some common metals, without experimental confirmation of having reached any steady state. This overview has been motivated by the scientific and technological interest of such an open-ended story. A tentative explanation for the newly proposed ultra-severe hardening deformation stage is given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Plasticity of Metals and Alloys)
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