Special Issue "Mechanical Properties of Stainless Steel"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Metal Casting, Forming and Heat Treatment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 916

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Zbigniew Brytan
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Konarskiego, 18a, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
Interests: stainless steels; corrosion; powder metallurgy; surface engineering; welding; additive manufacturing of metal parts
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Grzegorz Golański
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Production Engineering and Materials Technology, Częstochowa University Of Technology, 42-201 Czestochowa, Poland
Interests: steel; heat treatment; mechanical properties; microstructure; precipitates; welded joints
Prof. Dr. Marek Sroka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Konarskiego, 18a, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
Interests: steel; alloys; mechanical properties; mechanical properties; precipitates; microstructure; welded joints, creep; heat treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The properly designed chemical composition of stainless steels determines its internal structure and provides various material properties of individual grades. Austenitic stainless steels are very ductile, can be easily formed into complex shapes during stamping, and can be hardened to a high strength under plastic deformation. Depending on their chemical composition, Cr–Ni, Cr–Ni–Mo, and Cr–Mn austenitic steels represent a broad group of materials with various mechanical and corrosion properties. Cr–Mn stainless steels with a high susceptibility to work hardening are gaining popularity. Ferritic stainless steels without nickel addition are cheaper than austenitic grades, and represent an economical alternative for many industrial applications. Good corrosion resistance, formability, and low cost are the main advantages of ferritic grades. Depending on the content of chromium, titanium, and molybdenum, popular ferritic grades can be easily welded and formed by deep drawing. On the other hand, duplex stainless steels combine the advantages of austenite and ferrite structures in one material. These steels combine the benefits of single-phase grades, which allow for high strength and corrosion resistance at the same time. In recent years, the so-called lean duplex steels, which, thanks to chemical composition optimisation, can be cheaper, while maintaining high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Stainless steels can also be hardened, making the structure martensitic, thus giving very hard and wear-resistant material. Many applications require both wear and corrosion resistance, and this is where martensitic grades are used. Their wide range of material properties makes stainless steels more widely used in virtually every area of life and industry. Moreover, there are increasing possibilities for the application of these materials, which result from intensive research work in the field, aimed at improving the operational properties of stainless steels.

This Special Issue will address the phenomena related to stainless steels' mechanical properties. This Issue's scope is extensive, providing the possibility to present developments and research in all aspects of this field, and includes various processes causing changes in the mechanical properties of stainless steels, such as heat treatment, surface treatment, thermomechanical treatment, and forming and joining methods. The influence of service conditions (heat, creep, thermal shock, fatigue, erosion, wear, corrosion, etc.) on the microstructural changes and mechanical properties' alteration will also be addressed.

Prof. Dr. Zbigniew Brytan
Prof. Dr. Grzegorz Golański
Prof. Dr. Marek Sroka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Stainless Steel
  • Plastic Deformation
  • Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation
  • Martensitic Transformation
  • Creep
  • Microstructure
  • Mechanical Properties
  • Precipitation
  • Corrosion Resistance
  • Welding of Stainless Steel

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Investigation on the Correlation between Inclusions and High Temperature Urea Corrosion Behavior in Ferritic Stainless Steel
Metals 2021, 11(11), 1823; https://doi.org/10.3390/met11111823 - 13 Nov 2021
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Abstract
The influence of inclusion size and number density on high-temperature urea corrosion (HTUC) behavior of ferritic stainless steels was investigated in a simulated working environment of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system in commercial vehicles. There is a positive correlation between the control level [...] Read more.
The influence of inclusion size and number density on high-temperature urea corrosion (HTUC) behavior of ferritic stainless steels was investigated in a simulated working environment of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system in commercial vehicles. There is a positive correlation between the control level of inclusions and the resistance of HTUC. By slightly increasing the content of Nb in ferritic stainless steels, the inclusions, especially TiN, were significantly refined, and thus displayed an improvement in HTUC resistance. The interface between inclusions and the matrix becomes a fast channel for chromium precipitation during high-temperature nitriding induced by the decomposition of urea. Chromium nitrides will precipitate around the inclusions and wrap the inclusions, which will decrease the chromium equivalent of the matrix and reduce the resistance of ferritic stainless steels to HTUC. In addition, the high-temperature oxidation accompanied with thermal fatigue also makes the inclusions more likely to become the crack nucleation source, which can accelerate the material thinning and reduce its service life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical Properties of Stainless Steel)
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