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Corrosion Resistance of Alloy and Coating Materials (Volume II)

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2024 | Viewed by 3830

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Konarskiego, 18a, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
Interests: stainless steels; corrosion
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The material property of corrosion resistance is one of the most important in practical applications and determines the lifetime of each product. For years, corrosion of engineering materials has been a big problem in industrial conditions, often causing significant economic losses and catastrophic damage to technical facilities. The material degradation can be minimized and component life extended by the use of suitable alloys and corrosion-resistant coatings produced by many surface engineering methods.

The occurrence of corrosion and its practical control is an area of study covering a wide range of scientific knowledge and requires an interdisciplinary approach to resolving corrosion problems. Hence, the purpose of this Special Issue is to explore the current status of the development and performance of all aspects of alloys, coatings, and surface modification methods aimed at improving the corrosion resistance of the material.

This Special Issue will address the problem of the corrosion of alloys and coating materials. The scope of this Issue is extensive, giving the possibility to present developments and research in all aspects of this field, and includes both metallic and non-metallic corrosion. Key research topics that relate to the Special Issue include but are not limited to the following: cause and rate of corrosion of alloys and coating materials and methods of investigation, quality and mechanisms of deterioration, corrosion protection, and testing to assess corrosion resistance. Subjects of interest will also include the corrosion behavior of metals and their alloys (e.g., aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and nickel alloys); PVD, CVD, and ALD coatings; and other materials, including nanomaterials.

I kindly invite you to submit your work to this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Zbigniew Brytan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • corrosion
  • corrosion-resistant alloys
  • light metals and alloys
  • ferrous and non-ferrous alloys
  • corrosion-resistant coatings and their characterization
  • surface modification of advanced alloys
  • electrochemical methods for corrosion testing
  • localized corrosion
  • high-temperature corrosion

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 4696 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Electron Beam-Melted (EBM) Ti–6Al–4V Alloy and Its Susceptibility to Hydrogen
by Noa Lulu-Bitton, Nissim U. Navi, Shlomo Haroush, Eyal Sabatani, Natalie Kostirya, Eitan Tiferet, Yaron I. Ganor, Ofer Omesi, Gennadi Agronov and Noam Eliaz
Materials 2024, 17(12), 2846; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17122846 - 11 Jun 2024
Viewed by 223
Abstract
The effects of the secondary processes of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) at 920 °C and Heat Treatment (HT) at 1000 °C of Electron Beam-Melted (EBM) Ti–6Al–4V alloy on the microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) after electrochemical hydrogen charging (EC) were investigated. Comprehensive characterization, [...] Read more.
The effects of the secondary processes of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) at 920 °C and Heat Treatment (HT) at 1000 °C of Electron Beam-Melted (EBM) Ti–6Al–4V alloy on the microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) after electrochemical hydrogen charging (EC) were investigated. Comprehensive characterization, including microstructural analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal desorption analysis, and mechanical testing, was conducted. After HIP, the β-phase morphology changed from discontinuous Widmanstätten to a more continuous structure, 10 times and ~1.5 times larger in length and width, respectively. Following HT, the β-phase morphology changed to a continuous “web-like” structure, ~4.5 times larger in width. Despite similar mechanical behavior in their non-hydrogenated state, the post-treated alloys exhibit increased susceptibility to HE due to enhanced hydrogen penetration into the bulk. It is shown that hydrogen content in the samples’ bulk is inversely dependent on surface hydride content. It is therefore concluded that the formed hydride surface layer is crucial for inhibiting further hydrogen penetration and adsorption into the bulk and thus for reducing HE susceptibility. The lack of a hydride surface layer in the samples subject to HIP and HT highlights the importance of choosing secondary treatment process parameters that will not increase the continuous β-phase morphology of EBM Ti–6Al–4V alloys in applications that involve electrochemical hydrogen environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Resistance of Alloy and Coating Materials (Volume II))
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15 pages, 13141 KiB  
Article
Microstructure and Property Evolution of Diamond/GaInSn Composites under Thermal Load and High Humidity
by Shijie Du, Hong Guo, Jie Zhang, Zhongnan Xie, Hui Yang, Nan Wu and Yulin Liu
Materials 2024, 17(5), 1152; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17051152 - 1 Mar 2024
Viewed by 582
Abstract
As a thermal interface material, diamond/GaInSn composites have wide-ranging application prospects in the thermal management of chips. However, studies on systematic reliability that can guide the practical application of diamond/GaInSn in the high-temperature, high-temperature impact, or high-humidity service environments that are faced by [...] Read more.
As a thermal interface material, diamond/GaInSn composites have wide-ranging application prospects in the thermal management of chips. However, studies on systematic reliability that can guide the practical application of diamond/GaInSn in the high-temperature, high-temperature impact, or high-humidity service environments that are faced by chips remain lacking. In this study, the performance evolution of diamond/GaInSn was studied under high-temperature storage (150 °C), high- and low-temperature cycling (−50 °C to 125 °C), and high temperature and high humidity (85 °C and 85% humidity). The experimental results reveal the failure mechanism of semi-solid composites during high temperature oxidation. It is revealed that core oxidation is the key to the degradation of liquid metal composites’ properties under high-temperature storage and high- and low-temperature cycling conditions. Under the conditions of high temperature and high humidity, the failure of Ga-based liquid metal and its composite materials is significant. Therefore, the material should avoid high-temperature and high-humidity environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Resistance of Alloy and Coating Materials (Volume II))
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14 pages, 3840 KiB  
Article
Effect of Current Density on the Corrosion Resistance and Photocatalytic Properties of Cu-Ni-Zn0.96Ni0.02Cu0.02O Nanocomposite Coatings
by Haifeng Tan, Wenchao Yang, Mingzhu Hao, Chao Wang, Jie Yang, Haixuan Sunyu, Yunhe Ling, Guihong Song and Chunlin He
Materials 2023, 16(14), 4925; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16144925 - 10 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1110
Abstract
2 at.% Cu + 2 at.% Ni were co-doped in ZnO nanoparticles by a simple hydrothermal method, and then the modified nanoparticles were compounded into Cu-Ni alloy coatings using an electroplating technique. The effects of the current density (15–45 mA/cm2) on [...] Read more.
2 at.% Cu + 2 at.% Ni were co-doped in ZnO nanoparticles by a simple hydrothermal method, and then the modified nanoparticles were compounded into Cu-Ni alloy coatings using an electroplating technique. The effects of the current density (15–45 mA/cm2) on the phase structure, surface morphology, thickness, microhardness, corrosion resistance, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings were investigated. The results show that the Cu-Ni-Zn0.96Ni0.02Cu0.02O nanocomposite coatings had the highest compactness and the best overall performance at a current density of 35 mA/cm2. At this point, the co-deposition rate reached its maximum, resulting in the deposition of more Zn0.96Ni0.02Cu0.02O nanoparticles in the coating. More nanoparticles were dispersed in the coating with a better particle strengthening effect, which resulted in a minimum crystallite size of 15.21 nm and a maximum microhardness of 558 HV. Moreover, the surface structure of the coatings became finer and denser. Therefore, the corrosion resistance was significantly improved with a corrosion current density of 2.21 × 10–3 mA/cm2, and the charge transfer resistance was up to 20.98 kΩ·cm2. The maximum decolorization rate of the rhodamine B solution was 24.08% under ultraviolet light irradiation for 5 h. The improvement in the comprehensive performance was mainly attributed to the greater concentration of Zn0.96Ni0.02Cu0.02O nanoparticles in the coating, which played the role of the particle-reinforced phase and reduced the microstructure defects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Resistance of Alloy and Coating Materials (Volume II))
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15 pages, 4188 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Properties of (Cu, Ni) Co-Doped ZnO Nanoparticle-Reinforced Cu-Ni Nanocomposite Coatings
by Haifeng Tan, Chunlin He, Jie Yang, Haixuan Sunyu, Yunhe Ling, Jinlin Zhang and Guihong Song
Materials 2023, 16(7), 2746; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16072746 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1144
Abstract
Here, 2% Cu + 2% Ni co-doped ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized using the hydrothermal method and were used as particle reinforcements of Cu-Ni nanocomposite coatings prepared by electroplating technology. The effects of the added (Cu, Ni) co-doped ZnO nanoparticles (2–8 g/L) on the [...] Read more.
Here, 2% Cu + 2% Ni co-doped ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized using the hydrothermal method and were used as particle reinforcements of Cu-Ni nanocomposite coatings prepared by electroplating technology. The effects of the added (Cu, Ni) co-doped ZnO nanoparticles (2–8 g/L) on the phase structure, surface morphology, thickness, microhardness, corrosion resistance, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings were investigated. The nanocomposite coatings have obvious diffraction peaks on the crystal planes of (111), (200), and (220), showing a wurtzite structure. The surface of the nanocomposite coatings is cauliflower-like, and becomes smoother and denser with the increase in the addition of nanoparticles. The grain size, thickness, microhardness, corrosion resistance, and photocatalytic properties of the nanocomposite coating reach a peak value when the added (Cu, Ni) co-doped ZnO nanoparticles are 6 g/L. At this concentration, the mean crystallite size of the coating reaches a minimum of 15.31 nm, and the deposition efficiency of the coating is the highest. The (Cu, Ni) co-doped ZnO nanoparticle reinforcement makes the microhardness reach up to 658 HV. The addition of nanoparticles significantly improves the corrosion resistance and photocatalytic properties of nanocomposite coatings. The minimum corrosion current density is 2.36 × 10−6 A/cm2, the maximum corrosion potential is −0.301 V, and the highest decolorization rate of Rhodamine B is 28.73% after UV irradiation for 5 h. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Resistance of Alloy and Coating Materials (Volume II))
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