Special Issue "Advances in the Management of Shoulder Pathologies"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1010-660X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor and Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery. Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Italy
Interests: Sports traumatology of; Arthroscopic surgery of shoulder, knee and ankle; Replacement surgery of shoulder, knee and hip
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Prof. Vincenzo Denaro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Full Professor and Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Via Álvaro Del Portillo, 200, 00128 Roma, Italy
Interests: Spine surgery (scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, spinal disc herniation, myelopathy); Hip, knee and shoulder replacement surgery; Foot surgery; Hand surgery
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Shoulder pathologies are one of the most common musculoskeletal problems. They encompass a broad range of different conditions, including dislocations, rotator cuff tears, and osteoarthritis. They produce pain and loss of function of the affected arm, being one of the major causes of reduced work activities, with decreased health-related quality of life and representing a high cost for national healths systems. In recent years, orthopedics has embraced innovations and new techniques with the aim to improve the standard of care and reduce associated costs.

Therefore, the purpose of this Special Issue is to highlight new advances in the field of shoulder disease, taking into account pathogenic factors, bio-engineering, new implants, and the use of new technologies.

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
Prof. Vincenzo Denaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Quality of life
  • Shoulder
  • Dislocations
  • Rotator cuff
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Work activities
  • Artrhroscopy
  • Replacement
  • Bioengineering
  • Tissue engineering

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Arthroscopic Latarjet for Recurrent Shoulder Instability
Medicina 2019, 55(9), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55090582 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
Background and Objectives: The all-arthroscopic Latarjet (aL) procedure was introduced to manage recurrent shoulder instability. Our study aimed to report the outcomes of aL procedures with the Rowe, University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), simple shoulder test (SST) scores, and range of motion (ROM) [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: The all-arthroscopic Latarjet (aL) procedure was introduced to manage recurrent shoulder instability. Our study aimed to report the outcomes of aL procedures with the Rowe, University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), simple shoulder test (SST) scores, and range of motion (ROM) in external rotation at a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Material and Methods: A total of 44 patients presenting recurrent shoulder instability were managed with aL procedure. Clinical outcomes were assessed at a mean follow-up of 29.6 ± 6.9 months. The postoperative active ROM was measured and compared with the contralateral shoulder. The Rowe, UCLA, and SST scores were administered preoperatively and postoperatively. Results: No patients experienced infections or neuro-vascular injuries. Seven (15%) patients required revision surgery. After surgery, the external rotation was statistically lower compared to the contralateral shoulder, but it improved; clinical outcomes also improved in a statistically significant fashion. Conclusions: The aL produced good results in the management of recurrent shoulder instability, but the complication rate was still high even in the hands of expert arthroscopist. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Management of Shoulder Pathologies)
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Open AccessArticle
Conservative Rehabilitation Provides Superior Clinical Results Compared to Early Aggressive Rehabilitation for Rotator Cuff Repair: A Retrospective Comparative Study
Medicina 2019, 55(8), 402; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55080402 - 24 Jul 2019
Abstract
Background and objectives: To compare the long term clinical outcomes, range of motion (ROM) and strength of two different postoperative rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR) for full-thickness rotator cuff (RC) tears. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing RCR were divided into [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: To compare the long term clinical outcomes, range of motion (ROM) and strength of two different postoperative rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR) for full-thickness rotator cuff (RC) tears. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing RCR were divided into two groups. In 51 patients (56 shoulders), rehabilitation was performed without passive external rotation, anterior elevation ROM, and active pendulum exercises in the first 2 weeks after surgery (Group A). In 49 patients (50 shoulders) aggressive rehabilitation was implemented, with early free passive external rotation, anterior elevation ROM, and active pendulum exercises were allowed from the day after surgery (Group A). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in clinical scores, muscle strength, passive forward flexion, passive and active internal/external rotation between the two groups. However, the mean active forward flexion was 167.3° ± 26° (range 90–180°) in group A and 156.5° ± 30.5° (range 90–180°) in group B (p = 0.04). Conclusions: A statistically significant difference between the 2 groups was found in active forward flexion ROM, which was better in patients of group A. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Management of Shoulder Pathologies)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Sleep Disturbance and Rotator Cuff Tears: A Systematic Review
Medicina 2019, 55(8), 453; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55080453 - 08 Aug 2019
Abstract
Background and Objectives: Sleep disorders are one of the most common complaints of patients with rotator cuff (RC) tears. However, potential correlations between the treatment of RC tears and the causal factors of sleep disorders are still under discussion. The aim of [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Sleep disorders are one of the most common complaints of patients with rotator cuff (RC) tears. However, potential correlations between the treatment of RC tears and the causal factors of sleep disorders are still under discussion. The aim of this review is to evaluate quality of sleep in patients before and after surgery for RC tears and to identify which factors affected patients’ sleep. Materials and Methods: A systematic review was conducted. To provide high quality of the review, the included studies were evaluated with the standardized tool “Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies” developed by the Effective Public Health Practice Project. Results: The search strategy yielded 78 articles. After duplicate removal and titles, abstracts and full-texts review, four studies were included in the systematic review. Concerning shoulder function, the most frequently reported scale was the Simple Shoulder Test (SST). Regarding sleep quality, the most frequently reported score was the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Conclusion: We found that the majority of patients with RC tears had a sleep disturbance, especially before surgery with a general improvement in sleep quality post-operatively. Moreover, sleep quality was correlated with pain and it also seems that factors as comorbidities, obligatory position during night time, preoperative and prolonged postoperative use of narcotics and psychiatric issues may play an important role in sleep quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Management of Shoulder Pathologies)
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Other

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Open AccessCase Report
Effect of Balance Taping Using Kinesiology Tape and Cross Taping on Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: A Case Report
Medicina 2019, 55(10), 648; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55100648 - 26 Sep 2019
Abstract
Background and objectives: Shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most common disorder among people with shoulder pain. The purpose of this case report was to investigate the effect of the combined application of balance taping using kinesiology tape and cross taping on a [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most common disorder among people with shoulder pain. The purpose of this case report was to investigate the effect of the combined application of balance taping using kinesiology tape and cross taping on a part-time worker with SIS. Case Report: Combined balance taping and cross taping was applied for 3 weeks (average, 16 hours per day) on a part-time worker with severe pain and a limited range of motion (ROM) in the shoulder who had visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores of 7 and 8 out of 10 for shoulder flexion and abduction, respectively, and pain and disability scores of the Shoulder Pain Disability Index (SPADI) of 37 out of 50 and 29 out of 80, respectively. After the combined application of balance taping and cross taping, the VAS pain scores for shoulder flexion and abduction decreased from 7 to 0 and from 8 to 0, respectively, and the ROM increased to a normal range. The SPADI pain score decreased from 37 to 2, and the disability score decreased from 29 to 1. Shoulder activity level also increased, and the patient was able to return to his part-time job. Conclusions: We suggest combined application of balance taping and cross taping as an effective treatment for part-time workers with SIS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Management of Shoulder Pathologies)
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